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Jay Kim

NEWS
March 11, 1998 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One day after being sentenced for campaign finance violations, Rep. Jay Kim (R-Diamond Bar) flew to Washington on Tuesday, determined to resume his congressional duties even as some local Republicans were writing his political obituary. "I have great faith in the voters, and I don't believe that voters are going to reelect someone who has spit in the face of the democratic system of government," said Los Angeles Republican consultant Harvey Englander.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An Orange County prosecutor who served in the Reagan administration will join Assemblyman Gary Miller in challenging embattled Rep. Jay Kim in June's open primary. Beginning Monday, about 17,000 households in Kim's 41st Congressional District will be mailed an introduction to Peter W. Pierce, a deputy district attorney since 1993. Pierce is asking voters to return a resolution urging Kim to resign before he is sentenced Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1997
The guilty plea Monday by Rep. Jay C. Kim (R-Diamond Bar) to misdemeanors stemming from his 1992 campaign was regrettable evidence of the effect that the astronomical cost of running for public office can have on congressional candidates. Kim and his wife, June, face up to six months in prison when they are sentenced in October for concealing illegal campaign contributions. Even if he escapes jail time and even though he is not required by law to step down, Kim nevertheless should resign.
OPINION
August 10, 1997
Rep. Jay Kim's (R-Diamond Bar) recent admission that he violated campaign finance laws (Aug. 1) underscores the continuing investigations occurring in Washington of other countries trying to influence our election system. Prosecutors wanted to pursue felony counts against the congressman but Washington, especially in the current climate, chose to offer misdemeanors instead. This is consistent with Kim's entire congressional life and the manner in which he was elected; he's been let off. Consider that during the 1992 election (and since)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1996 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pleading guilty to campaign finance fraud, the American subsidiary of South Korean conglomerate Haitai International paid a $400,000 fine Monday for illegally laundering a $2,800 contribution to the election campaign of Rep. Jay C. Kim (R-Diamond Bar). In a plea agreement with the government, the company also admitted that three top officers tried to obstruct an FBI investigation into the illicit donations.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hyundai controller Paul Koh was found not guilty Thursday of conspiring to illegally contribute corporate money to the 1992 election campaign of Rep. Jay C. Kim (R-Diamond Bar). Immediately after he was acquitted of charges that could have put him in federal prison for 10 years, Koh let out a loud moan of relief and hugged his attorneys, Jerome Roth and Bart Williams. His wife, Angie, was removed sobbing from the downtown courtroom at the request of U.S. Court Judge Richard A. Paez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1996 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paul Koh, the Hyundai Motor America controller charged with hiding illegal campaign contributions to Rep. Jay Kim (R-Diamond Bar), was simply following the actions started in 1992 by his superiors, including then company President J.O. Chung, Koh's attorney said Wednesday. "The government wants you to believe Paul Koh was the driving force behind a sinister plot," attorney Bart Williams said in his opening statement to the jury at Koh's federal trial in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1996
The trial of Hyundai Motor America controller Paul Koh, charged with hiding illegal corporate campaign contributions to Rep. Jay Kim (R-Diamond Bar), began Tuesday with the selection of a jury in Los Angeles federal court. Koh, 44, is accused of laundering $4,500 from Fountain Valley-based Hyundai into Kim's election campaign. If convicted, Koh could face up to 10 years in federal prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samsung America Inc. pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to making $10,000 in illegal corporate contributions to Rep. Jay C. Kim's election campaign and paid a $150,000 fine. That raised to $1 million the amount of fines the government has collected in its prosecution of corporations that illegally funneled money into the Diamond Bar Republican's 1992 race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1996 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a widening probe of campaign fraud by South Korea-based companies, a federal grand jury Wednesday indicted Samsung America on a charge of illegally funneling contributions to California Rep. Jay C. Kim. A month ago, two other Korea-headquartered companies, Hyundai Motor America and Korean Air Lines, pleaded guilty to similar charges and paid fines totaling $850,000, the largest ever levied for campaign finance fraud. Assistant U.S. Atty. Stephen A.
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