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Jay L Johnson

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June 5, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton has decided to nominate Adm. Jay L. Johnson to become chief of naval operations, replacing the late Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda, who committed suicide May 16, senior administration officials said Tuesday. Johnson, who will be 50 today, has been serving as vice chief--the Navy's No. 2 slot--since March. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and a decorated aviator, he is regarded as an intelligent, if uncharismatic, leader with a good reputation as an administrator.
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NEWS
June 6, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When local graduates of the Navy's elite Top Gun combat fighter school landed back at their home base near Norfolk, Va., one Saturday evening in 1982, they were startled to see a lone gray Navy pickup racing onto the Tarmac to meet them. Fearing an emergency, they braced for the worst. Instead, out popped a grinning, impeccably dressed young officer with a truck full of cold drinks, ready to toast their success. It was their squadron commander, then-Cmdr. Jay L. Johnson, welcoming his men home.
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NEWS
June 6, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When local graduates of the Navy's elite Top Gun combat fighter school landed back at their home base near Norfolk, Va., one Saturday evening in 1982, they were startled to see a lone gray Navy pickup racing onto the Tarmac to meet them. Fearing an emergency, they braced for the worst. Instead, out popped a grinning, impeccably dressed young officer with a truck full of cold drinks, ready to toast their success. It was their squadron commander, then-Cmdr. Jay L. Johnson, welcoming his men home.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton has decided to nominate Adm. Jay L. Johnson to become chief of naval operations, replacing the late Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda, who committed suicide May 16, senior administration officials said Tuesday. Johnson, who will be 50 today, has been serving as vice chief--the Navy's No. 2 slot--since March. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and a decorated aviator, he is regarded as an intelligent, if uncharismatic, leader with a good reputation as an administrator.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen made a strong plea to Congress on Wednesday for authority to close more military bases, but some service chiefs sent a less enthusiastic signal. "As the smallest service with the fewest number of bases, I know of no installation that I would recommend be closed in the Marine Corps," Gen. James L. Jones, the Marine Corps commandant, told the Senate Armed Services Committee. Adm. Jay L.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | JOHN MINTZ, WASHINGTON POST
President Clinton spent a tearful hour and a half Saturday consoling the widow of Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda and their four children in the family's home at the Washington Navy Yard. The visit ended with Clinton and the family holding hands in prayer for Boorda, the Navy's top officer, who shot himself outside the house on Thursday. "It was a very personal and emotional visit," said White House spokesman Brian Cullen. "As overwhelming as it was for the family, they were grateful he was there."
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The site looks like a movie lot for disaster films, but the training received by the Marines here is the stuff of recent international headlines, not a screenwriter's imagination. Deep in the brushy, rattlesnake-infested hills of this sprawling base, Marines who will deploy soon for six months in the Western Pacific and the Middle East are training for what has become a Marine Corps specialty: rescuing American civilians and other noncombatants from strife-torn Third World hot spots.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Navy F-14 fighter jet crashed and exploded in Virginia on Wednesday, heightening concern about the safety of the aging aircraft that has crashed four times in the last three months. Although Navy officials have said that the crash rate of the F-14 is not significantly worse than other carrier-based combat aircraft, safety experts are growing increasingly worried that the accidents could hamper the Navy's ability to perform its missions.
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | From The Times Washington Bureau
PRESIDENTIAL PARTY: The first family is planning to celebrate President Clinton's 50th birthday next week with all the subtlety and understatement of the 1993 inaugural. The extravaganza, to be produced by Jeff Margolis--whose credits include the Academy Awards program and the Miss America pageant--will be held at Radio City Music Hall in New York on Aug. 18. Hillary Rodham Clinton is in charge of planning the bash.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they await word from Washington that could send them to war, can-do Yankee confidence and a television-reinforced sense of disconnection share the cockpit with young Americans patrolling the skies over tormented Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Navy and Marine Corps officials, pressed by Congress about the spate of recent crashes involving the F-14 Tomcat and AV-8B Harrier jet fighter planes, said Tuesday they have decided not to order major upgrades of those aircraft partly because of budget limitations.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the attack submarine Oklahoma City, sailors share bathrooms with 32 other men, sleep atop torpedoes and attend Sunday services in a space that also functions as the officers' dining room, reading room and surgical theater. Spending months at a time inside a 360-foot vessel with 145 men, a nuclear reactor and dozens of torpedoes and cruise missiles is like living inside a Swiss watch, crew members say. And in the view of some submariners and their superiors, it's no place for a woman.
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