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Jay Levy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1993 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A suspended lawyer who operated a Westside business and financial management firm has been charged with bilking his clients, including actress Olivia Hussey, out of $1.24 million. Jay Lawrence Levy, 51, was arrested in Venice earlier this week and was held on $445,000 bail. His estranged wife and former office manager, Rochelle Perrie Levy, surrendered to police Wednesday and was held on $200,000 bail.
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NEWS
August 8, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
There is no cure for AIDS, no good treatment to control its symptoms for long periods and no vaccine to prevent it, for one major reason: HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus that causes the disease, is a sloppy housekeeper when it comes to tending its genetic endowment. Every time HIV replicates, it makes mistakes, at least one error per generation of the virus. Within a few generations, it can begin to take on subtly different characteristics.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a farmer had a dog, And Bingo was his name-o! Country music's legendary Merle Haggard singing "Bingo" on a children's record is about as incongruous as Bob Dylan's rendition of "This Old Man" on last year's pop all-star album "For the Children," from Walt Disney Records. Sing it Haggard does--smooth and sweet--on Disney's latest all-star effort, "Country Music for Kids," this one a for-profit venture, unlike "For the Children," which benefited the Pediatric AIDS Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1993 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A suspended lawyer who operated a Westside business and financial management firm has been charged with bilking his clients, including actress Olivia Hussey, out of $1.24 million. Jay Lawrence Levy, 51, was arrested in Venice earlier this week and was held on $445,000 bail. His estranged wife and former office manager, Rochelle Perrie Levy, surrendered to police Wednesday and was held on $200,000 bail.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
There is no cure for AIDS, no good treatment to control its symptoms for long periods and no vaccine to prevent it, for one major reason: HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus that causes the disease, is a sloppy housekeeper when it comes to tending its genetic endowment. Every time HIV replicates, it makes mistakes, at least one error per generation of the virus. Within a few generations, it can begin to take on subtly different characteristics.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | JOAN LIBMAN
Dr. Jay Goldstein of Anaheim Hills has spent the last five years researching and treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating disease characterized by incapacitating exhaustion and a range of other perplexing symptoms. Explaining his theory of an unknown retrovirus invading the immune system, inducing cells to produce a chemical transmitter affecting the entire body, Goldstein pauses. "You know," the family practitioner says, "some very respected physicians will tell you I am crazy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1990
A blood test may soon be available that will help identify people who suffer from the baffling ailment known as chronic fatigue syndrome. The disorder, which may affect more than three million Americans, is characterized by debilitating fatigue, often accompanied by flu-like symptoms that substantially reduce a person's ability to function normally and may persist for years. Despite numerous studies, researchers have been unable to find out what causes CFS.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A new blood test will aid in diagnosing chronic fatigue syndrome, an influenza-like illness nicknamed "yuppie flu." Dr. Jay Levy, announcing the test's development at a medical conference on the illness in Charlotte, N. C., predicted that it will become the "disease of the '90s." He said: "It takes about decade before the public wakes up and realizes that this is not going to go away."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1987
A yearlong investigation of computer fraud involving 31 law-enforcement agencies led Department of Motor Vehicles investigators to a Sherman Oaks debt-collection firm, where they removed business records Wednesday, a DMV investigator said. Gary Naylor, supervising investigator for the DMV's Arleta office, said telephone records show that "hundreds" of calls were made to various city, county and state law-enforcement agencies from the California Financial Credit Co.
NEWS
January 27, 1985
A new study has found that fewer homosexual men in San Francisco have been exposed to the virus associated with AIDS than was previously believed. Dr. Robert Anderson of San Francisco's Children's Hospital reported that tests of blood samples from 200 homosexual men showed 39% of the men had antibodies for the virus, indicating that they had probably been exposed to AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a farmer had a dog, And Bingo was his name-o! Country music's legendary Merle Haggard singing "Bingo" on a children's record is about as incongruous as Bob Dylan's rendition of "This Old Man" on last year's pop all-star album "For the Children," from Walt Disney Records. Sing it Haggard does--smooth and sweet--on Disney's latest all-star effort, "Country Music for Kids," this one a for-profit venture, unlike "For the Children," which benefited the Pediatric AIDS Foundation.
NEWS
April 3, 1986
Members of the Cheviot Hills Homeowners Assn. will present petitions at a public hearing Tuesday to protest a resident's request to conduct business at his home in an R-1 zoned residential neighborhood. Jay L. Levy will present his application for a zoning variance at a public hearing at 10 a.m. in West Los Angeles City Hall, 1645 Corinth Ave. He is seeking permission to use his home at 10321 Cresta Drive as an office for his business and financial management firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1986 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
An experimental vaccine based on the polio vaccine has protected monkeys from a deadly AIDS-like virus for more than a year, scientists at the University of California, Davis, report. "It worked even better than we thought it would," said Dr. Preston Marx, a virologist at the California Primate Research Center and head of a 13-member research team. He said the year-old study compared six vaccinated monkeys with six others not given such protection.
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