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Jay Moloney

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NEWS
November 17, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He was one of Hollywood's hottest young agents, an ambitious Armani-clad local kid who started out as an intern from USC sorting mail and practically overnight represented such top talent as Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Mike Nichols, David Letterman and Dustin Hoffman. On Tuesday morning, Jay Moloney was found hanged from a shower head at his rented Mulholland Drive home, two days after celebrating his 35th birthday at a small dinner party with friends.
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OPINION
November 21, 1999
Hollywood agent Jay Moloney is good-looking, earns big bucks, has supportive friends and lives in swell digs, yet he chooses to throw it all away with cocaine and then kills himself, and The Times considers this a front-page tragedy (Nov. 17)? I don't have 1/10th of the opportunities Moloney has had, so perhaps I should blow my brains out. But I don't have caring friends who would find my body, and you wouldn't consider it newsworthy! Your compassion is misplaced. DOLORES LONG Van Nuys
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BUSINESS
November 19, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER
What part, if any, did Hollywood's social excess and heady, all-consuming business play in the apparent suicide of a former star agent who appeared to have it all--money, power, status and youth? It's a lingering question following the death of former wunderkind Jay Moloney, who was found hanged Tuesday morning in the shower of his Mulholland Drive house, just two days after his 35th birthday.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER
What part, if any, did Hollywood's social excess and heady, all-consuming business play in the apparent suicide of a former star agent who appeared to have it all--money, power, status and youth? It's a lingering question following the death of former wunderkind Jay Moloney, who was found hanged Tuesday morning in the shower of his Mulholland Drive house, just two days after his 35th birthday.
OPINION
November 21, 1999
Hollywood agent Jay Moloney is good-looking, earns big bucks, has supportive friends and lives in swell digs, yet he chooses to throw it all away with cocaine and then kills himself, and The Times considers this a front-page tragedy (Nov. 17)? I don't have 1/10th of the opportunities Moloney has had, so perhaps I should blow my brains out. But I don't have caring friends who would find my body, and you wouldn't consider it newsworthy! Your compassion is misplaced. DOLORES LONG Van Nuys
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1988 | Pat H. Broeske
How many studio executives does it take to screw in a light bulb? Well, OK, we don't know the answer to that one. But we do know that no fewer than 21 execs, agents, publicists and other assorted retainers were advised the other day when a couple of "Rain Man" publicity photos of Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise were mailed to media types. See, we came across this one-paragraph United Artists letter, concerning some b&w shots of the two stars.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2007 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
CBS Corp. Chief Executive Leslie Moonves has hired a top creative executive to oversee his fledgling movie division, which aims to make four to six films a year with budgets of as much as $50 million apiece. Amy Baer, who had been a senior production executive at Sony's Columbia Pictures for the last nine years, will oversee the development, production, acquisition, marketing and distribution of the movies in her new role as president and CEO of the CBS unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | COLMAN ANDREWS
Spy magazine's pseudonymous Hollywood correspondent, Celia Brady, reports in the publication's April issue that Jay Moloney, assistant to show-biz super-agent Mike Ovitz (head of the Creative Artists Agency) "is a volunteer Spago employee." How so? "When the restaurant is unsure just how rude or fawning to be toward some patron whom they do not immediately recognize," Brady explains, "Moloney regularly gets a call and gives the CAA thumbs-up or thumbs-down on prospective diners."
BUSINESS
August 23, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're called the Young Turks, and they are a tight-knit fraternity of five hyper-ambitious thirtysomething agents who are about to inherit the mantle of Creative Artists Agency, Hollywood's largest talent agency. The imminent changing of the guard at CAA will mark a dramatic coming of age for the aggressive quintet--Jay Moloney, Richard Lovett, David (Doc) O'Connor, Kevin Huvane and Bryan Lourd--who have been handpicked and groomed over the years by their mentors, Michael S.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Dana Giacchetto, the boyish New York City money manager renowned for his ability to ingratiate himself with such young stars as Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon and Ben Affleck and Hollywood power broker Michael Ovitz, was charged Monday with three criminal counts for allegedly stealing at least $6 million of his clients' funds.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He was one of Hollywood's hottest young agents, an ambitious Armani-clad local kid who started out as an intern from USC sorting mail and practically overnight represented such top talent as Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Mike Nichols, David Letterman and Dustin Hoffman. On Tuesday morning, Jay Moloney was found hanged from a shower head at his rented Mulholland Drive home, two days after celebrating his 35th birthday at a small dinner party with friends.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER
When Richard Lovett took over the top job at Creative Artists Agency in 1995, the widespread reaction was "he's no Ovitz." As it turns out, that's been the good news for Hollywood. Today, the agency that dominated the industry for more than a decade under the visionary but imperious rule of Michael Ovitz is in the hands of a man more comfortable working a room than orchestrating a corporate mega-merger.
NEWS
June 7, 2002 | GINA PICCALO AND LOUISE ROUG
It was almost impossible to navigate through the elbow-to-elbow crowd clutching drinks and tapas in the small, low-ceilinged cantina on the Raleigh Studio back lot in Hollywood. Guests leaned against the red bricks and stucco of the Spanish-style walkways, balancing plates on their arms while they talked about the film they had just viewed--"ivansxtc." Most were incredulous that it had been made for so little--only $136,000. Others were struck by the intensity of the plot.
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