Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJay Nixon
IN THE NEWS

Jay Nixon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Depending on how the votes fall, the U.S. Senate race in Missouri could either confirm a former “purple” state as definitely red, or bring yet another costly loss for Republicans held back from a Senate majority by underperforming far-right conservatives. During the Republican candidates' run toward the right in the primaries, Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill, an idiosyncratic moderate, positioned herself to face the evangelical U.S. Rep. Todd Akin - whose “legitimate rape” comments later severed much outside Republican support as he refused calls to step down from the race.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Jo Ann Emerson (R-Mo.), freshly reelected to her ninth term in Congress, announced Monday that she would resign in February and become the president and chief executive of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Assn., the top donor to her campaigns during her congressional career. Emerson, who was elected to her late husband Bill Emerson's seat in a 1996 special election and was the first woman to represent Missouri in the House, handily won reelection earlier this year over Democratic rival Jack Rushin with nearly 72% of the vote.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
July 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Budget trouble extends far beyond California. Here's a rundown of other strapped states: Arizona -- Republican Gov. Jan Brewer kept state government running but rejected funding levels for K-12 schools and said she was calling a special session next week to increase school funding. Connecticut -- Gov. M. Jodi Rell vetoed the Democrats' proposal and was meeting privately with legislative leaders about a new two-year tax-and-spending plan.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Depending on how the votes fall, the U.S. Senate race in Missouri could either confirm a former “purple” state as definitely red, or bring yet another costly loss for Republicans held back from a Senate majority by underperforming far-right conservatives. During the Republican candidates' run toward the right in the primaries, Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill, an idiosyncratic moderate, positioned herself to face the evangelical U.S. Rep. Todd Akin - whose “legitimate rape” comments later severed much outside Republican support as he refused calls to step down from the race.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Rick Perry can shake off Tuesday's tough Republican debate by watching the Texas Rangers open up the 2011 World Series on Wednesday night. And if all goes according to plan, he'll have a six-pack of Budweiser to celebrate a championship in about a week. Governors and mayors often make friendly wagers on major sporting events. The second straight World Series appearance from the Texas Rangers means the Texas governor is again taking part in that ritual. If the Rangers beat the St. Louis Cardinals, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, has to send Perry quite a spread: toasted ravioli, gourmet prosciutto salami and other meats, frozen custard, and, yes, a six-pack of Bud. If the Cardinals triumph, Perry has to send Nixon some barbecue from the famous Salt Lick in Driftwood, Texas, along with some Dr Pepper.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of tornado survivors lined Joplin's main thoroughfares Sunday in anticipation of President Obama's tour of the storm-ravaged city, holding American flags and banners declaring the city would come back from its devastation. Obama flew over the worst-hit area of the city, viewing it from above, before landing in Joplin just after 12:20 p.m. CDT. "This town is beat, but we're not broke," said Catherine Maples, who wore a T-shirt scrawled with the words, "A country town can survive.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The death toll from the tornado that crushed Joplin has risen to 117, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon said on Tuesday, making it the deadliest such event in the U.S. since 1953. Speaking on the morning television shows, Nixon said the toll had risen overnight, but he stressed that rescue efforts will continue throughout the day. He was optimistic, especially since the stormy weather had cleared. "We have suffered a devastating loss," Joplin City Manager Mark Rohr told reporters at a televised news conference.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Jo Ann Emerson (R-Mo.), freshly reelected to her ninth term in Congress, announced Monday that she would resign in February and become the president and chief executive of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Assn., the top donor to her campaigns during her congressional career. Emerson, who was elected to her late husband Bill Emerson's seat in a 1996 special election and was the first woman to represent Missouri in the House, handily won reelection earlier this year over Democratic rival Jack Rushin with nearly 72% of the vote.
NATIONAL
February 29, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Bill Ruthhart
Tornadoes ripped across the Midwest and into the South on Wednesday, leveling homes and businesses, killing at least a dozen people and injuring more than 100 in Illinois, Missouri and Tennessee. Forecasters warned that another major storm with tornado potential was due Friday in the Lower Mississippi River Valley. The southern Illinois town of Harrisburg bore the brunt of the fatalities, with six, from a storm packing winds of up to 166 mph, officials said. Three other people died in Missouri in the early morning, and another three in Tennessee in the evening.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Missouri officials announced Thursday that more than 200 residents of Joplin remain unaccounted for in the wake of the massive tornado that swept through the city. Mark Lindquist, however, is not among them. For agonizing hours in the wake of Sunday's storm, Lindquist's sister, Linda Lindquist-Baldwin, and other family members combed the area around the group home for the disabled where the 51-year-old Joplin resident had been working when the twister struck. Most of the people in the building had been found dead.
NATIONAL
February 29, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Bill Ruthhart
Tornadoes ripped across the Midwest and into the South on Wednesday, leveling homes and businesses, killing at least a dozen people and injuring more than 100 in Illinois, Missouri and Tennessee. Forecasters warned that another major storm with tornado potential was due Friday in the Lower Mississippi River Valley. The southern Illinois town of Harrisburg bore the brunt of the fatalities, with six, from a storm packing winds of up to 166 mph, officials said. Three other people died in Missouri in the early morning, and another three in Tennessee in the evening.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Rick Perry can shake off Tuesday's tough Republican debate by watching the Texas Rangers open up the 2011 World Series on Wednesday night. And if all goes according to plan, he'll have a six-pack of Budweiser to celebrate a championship in about a week. Governors and mayors often make friendly wagers on major sporting events. The second straight World Series appearance from the Texas Rangers means the Texas governor is again taking part in that ritual. If the Rangers beat the St. Louis Cardinals, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, has to send Perry quite a spread: toasted ravioli, gourmet prosciutto salami and other meats, frozen custard, and, yes, a six-pack of Bud. If the Cardinals triumph, Perry has to send Nixon some barbecue from the famous Salt Lick in Driftwood, Texas, along with some Dr Pepper.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of tornado survivors lined Joplin's main thoroughfares Sunday in anticipation of President Obama's tour of the storm-ravaged city, holding American flags and banners declaring the city would come back from its devastation. Obama flew over the worst-hit area of the city, viewing it from above, before landing in Joplin just after 12:20 p.m. CDT. "This town is beat, but we're not broke," said Catherine Maples, who wore a T-shirt scrawled with the words, "A country town can survive.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Missouri officials announced Thursday that more than 200 residents of Joplin remain unaccounted for in the wake of the massive tornado that swept through the city. Mark Lindquist, however, is not among them. For agonizing hours in the wake of Sunday's storm, Lindquist's sister, Linda Lindquist-Baldwin, and other family members combed the area around the group home for the disabled where the 51-year-old Joplin resident had been working when the twister struck. Most of the people in the building had been found dead.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The death toll from the tornado that crushed Joplin has risen to 117, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon said on Tuesday, making it the deadliest such event in the U.S. since 1953. Speaking on the morning television shows, Nixon said the toll had risen overnight, but he stressed that rescue efforts will continue throughout the day. He was optimistic, especially since the stormy weather had cleared. "We have suffered a devastating loss," Joplin City Manager Mark Rohr told reporters at a televised news conference.
NATIONAL
May 23, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The city of Joplin was changed from a typical small Missouri city into a zone of frenzied effort after Sunday's tornado as rescuers raced bad weather and coped with a shortage of supplies. At least 116 people were killed in the tornado, and the toll is expected to rise. Joplin City Manager Mark Rohr announced the latest death toll at a Monday afternoon news conference, according to the Associated Press. Rohr said seven people had been rescued. By midmorning Monday, about 20 hours after the tornado tore a six-mile wound in the heart of the city, residents searched through the rubble in what reminded many of a war zone.
NATIONAL
May 23, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The city of Joplin was changed from a typical small Missouri city into a zone of frenzied effort after Sunday's tornado as rescuers raced bad weather and coped with a shortage of supplies. At least 116 people were killed in the tornado, and the toll is expected to rise. Joplin City Manager Mark Rohr announced the latest death toll at a Monday afternoon news conference, according to the Associated Press. Rohr said seven people had been rescued. By midmorning Monday, about 20 hours after the tornado tore a six-mile wound in the heart of the city, residents searched through the rubble in what reminded many of a war zone.
NATIONAL
May 23, 2011 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A powerful tornado slammed into Joplin, Mo., on Sunday, killing at least 89 people as it ripped the top off a hospital, sheared parts of the roof off a high school and turned homes and major retail stores into heaps of rubble. City Manager Mark Rohr announced the death toll before dawn Monday outside the wreckage of the hospital, confirming the fears that officials had expressed earlier. The twister cut a nearly six-mile path through the middle of the southwestern Missouri town of 50,000 on a day that a series of turbulent storms swept through the Midwest.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|