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Jay Novacek

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SPORTS
January 30, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only real Dallas Cowboy owns a brick cabin in this town, seven miles from the nearest paved road, three hours from the nearest big city. There is a stuffed wild pig standing on the floor, a lasso hanging next to the fireplace and the Oregon Trail beyond the back porch. Bodies are supposedly buried every mile underneath that trail, which speaks to the real Dallas Cowboy of familiar tears of perseverance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg
I remember the day I turned on TV and immediately began trembling with excitement and fear. Excitement because I was watching "Sportsman's Quest," one of many wildlife series on ESPN2. Fear, because of the danger. My pulse was thumping, my heart beating like a tom-tom, for on the screen, vulnerable and exposed in southern Africa, was Jay Novacek. Sportsman in peril. Novacek had known pain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001 | JOE RUFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three-time Super Bowl champion tight end Jay Novacek likes to hunt antelope, deer and goats more than catching footballs. "I guarantee my heart will beat more pulling the trigger on an animal than catching a touchdown pass at the Super Bowl," the former Dallas Cowboy said. Novacek has turned his love for the hunt into a business, putting up an 8-foot-high steel-wire fence around 1,800 acres of steep hills and rugged canyons near his hometown of Gothenburg in central Nebraska.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001 | JOE RUFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three-time Super Bowl champion tight end Jay Novacek likes to hunt antelope, deer and goats more than catching footballs. "I guarantee my heart will beat more pulling the trigger on an animal than catching a touchdown pass at the Super Bowl," the former Dallas Cowboy said. Novacek has turned his love for the hunt into a business, putting up an 8-foot-high steel-wire fence around 1,800 acres of steep hills and rugged canyons near his hometown of Gothenburg in central Nebraska.
SPORTS
January 29, 1996 | T.J. SIMERS
Dallas tight end Jay Novacek had five catches for 50 yards, including a three-yard touchdown pass, but Steeler defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau was unimpressed. "We had some stuff in for Novacek," he said. "They were kind of lucky on a couple of patterns they hit with him. We weren't in that coverage much, but they happened to catch us that time. I didn't think he beat us in any way."
SPORTS
October 3, 1988 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Jay Novacek has the body of a decathlete (he was one), the demeanor of a corn farmer (he is one) and the title, for this week anyway, as the Phoenix Cardinals' leading receiver. Let that kind of wash over the old cranium. On a team that features the rather spectacular talents of J.T. Smith, who led the National Football League in receptions last season (91), and two-time Pro Bowler Roy Green, Jay Novacek is the No. 1 guy.
SPORTS
January 4, 1997 | Associated Press
The Dallas Cowboys put tight end Jay Novacek on the injured reserve list Friday, meaning he will not be eligible to play in the postseason. Novacek sat out the season because of a degenerative disk problem in his back. He had been trying to get ready for the playoffs but experienced some pain trying to run on level ground and the Cowboys decided his season was over.
SPORTS
December 24, 1995 | Associated Press
Dallas Cowboy tight end Jay Novacek was to undergo arthroscopic surgery on his right knee Saturday night to repair a partial tear of his medial meniscus. Novacek originally injured the knee in the fourth quarter of the game two weeks ago at Philadelphia. He aggravated the injury in practice Friday. An MRI exam detected the tear Saturday morning. Novacek will not travel to Tempe, Ariz., for Monday night's game between the Cowboys and the Arizona Cardinals.
SPORTS
December 18, 1996
There's a chance tight end Jay Novacek, who hasn't played in the regular season because of a bad back, will be available to the Dallas Cowboys for the playoffs. "He told some of our assistant coaches that his back has felt the best it has felt in a long time and is optimistic that he may play in the playoffs," Coach Barry Switzer said Tuesday in Irving, Texas. "That would be a tremendous lift for our team. I'll just wait for Jay to come to me and tell me when he's ready."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg
I remember the day I turned on TV and immediately began trembling with excitement and fear. Excitement because I was watching "Sportsman's Quest," one of many wildlife series on ESPN2. Fear, because of the danger. My pulse was thumping, my heart beating like a tom-tom, for on the screen, vulnerable and exposed in southern Africa, was Jay Novacek. Sportsman in peril. Novacek had known pain.
SPORTS
January 4, 1997 | Associated Press
The Dallas Cowboys put tight end Jay Novacek on the injured reserve list Friday, meaning he will not be eligible to play in the postseason. Novacek sat out the season because of a degenerative disk problem in his back. He had been trying to get ready for the playoffs but experienced some pain trying to run on level ground and the Cowboys decided his season was over.
SPORTS
December 18, 1996
There's a chance tight end Jay Novacek, who hasn't played in the regular season because of a bad back, will be available to the Dallas Cowboys for the playoffs. "He told some of our assistant coaches that his back has felt the best it has felt in a long time and is optimistic that he may play in the playoffs," Coach Barry Switzer said Tuesday in Irving, Texas. "That would be a tremendous lift for our team. I'll just wait for Jay to come to me and tell me when he's ready."
SPORTS
January 29, 1996 | T.J. SIMERS
Dallas tight end Jay Novacek had five catches for 50 yards, including a three-yard touchdown pass, but Steeler defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau was unimpressed. "We had some stuff in for Novacek," he said. "They were kind of lucky on a couple of patterns they hit with him. We weren't in that coverage much, but they happened to catch us that time. I didn't think he beat us in any way."
SPORTS
December 24, 1995 | Associated Press
Dallas Cowboy tight end Jay Novacek was to undergo arthroscopic surgery on his right knee Saturday night to repair a partial tear of his medial meniscus. Novacek originally injured the knee in the fourth quarter of the game two weeks ago at Philadelphia. He aggravated the injury in practice Friday. An MRI exam detected the tear Saturday morning. Novacek will not travel to Tempe, Ariz., for Monday night's game between the Cowboys and the Arizona Cardinals.
SPORTS
January 30, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only real Dallas Cowboy owns a brick cabin in this town, seven miles from the nearest paved road, three hours from the nearest big city. There is a stuffed wild pig standing on the floor, a lasso hanging next to the fireplace and the Oregon Trail beyond the back porch. Bodies are supposedly buried every mile underneath that trail, which speaks to the real Dallas Cowboy of familiar tears of perseverance.
SPORTS
October 3, 1988 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Jay Novacek has the body of a decathlete (he was one), the demeanor of a corn farmer (he is one) and the title, for this week anyway, as the Phoenix Cardinals' leading receiver. Let that kind of wash over the old cranium. On a team that features the rather spectacular talents of J.T. Smith, who led the National Football League in receptions last season (91), and two-time Pro Bowler Roy Green, Jay Novacek is the No. 1 guy.
SPORTS
August 31, 1992 | Associated Press
David Klingler, the Cincinnati Bengals' top draft pick, ended his holdout and signed a four-year contract that was expected to pay the quarterback $1.75 million per year. Klingler, who played at the University of Houston, was the sixth overall pick in the NFL draft. In other signings, Phoenix running back Johnny Johnson, Cleveland running back Eric Metcalf and Dallas tight end Jay Novacek ended their holdouts.
SPORTS
August 28, 1996 | Associated Press
The Carolina Panthers released outside linebacker Darion Conner, a starter last season, and swapped punters by waiving Kevin Feighery and signing Rohn Stark, who had been cut by Pittsburgh. . . . Tyji Armstrong, a four-year veteran tight end cut by Tampa Bay, has agreed to terms with the Dallas Cowboys to fill the final spot on their roster. The Cowboys have only one healthy tight end, Derek Ware.
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