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Jay Presson Allen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jay Presson Allen, an adapter of novels for stage and screen who stood out in an era when few women worked in that field, has died. She was 84. Allen died Monday at her home in Manhattan after suffering a stroke, daughter Brooke Allen said. Allen's work is credited with bringing out the best in several actresses, including Vanessa Redgrave, Maggie Smith and Liza Minnelli.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jay Presson Allen, an adapter of novels for stage and screen who stood out in an era when few women worked in that field, has died. She was 84. Allen died Monday at her home in Manhattan after suffering a stroke, daughter Brooke Allen said. Allen's work is credited with bringing out the best in several actresses, including Vanessa Redgrave, Maggie Smith and Liza Minnelli.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
True Stories: It is not a lie: The play "Tru" will return to Los Angeles a month after it leaves. Robert Morse will repeat his Tony Award-winning role of Truman Capote at the Henry Fonda Theatre beginning April 9. The Jay Presson Allen show closes its current run at the theater on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1991
Jay Presson Allen may justifiably feel a sense of satisfaction at what writer Kari Granville calls a "perfect fit of substance to form" in Allen's writing of "Tru" (April 22), but she has overlooked a glaring error in logic. In the dialogue Allen writes "with great facility," Truman Capote says he's collected enough drugs to stage his own Jonestown massacre, which occurred in November, 1978. Since the action passes during Christmas week of 1975, how could even the witty Tru have known about it three years in advance?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1991
Jay Presson Allen may justifiably feel a sense of satisfaction at what writer Kari Granville calls a "perfect fit of substance to form" in Allen's writing of "Tru" (April 22), but she has overlooked a glaring error in logic. In the dialogue Allen writes "with great facility," Truman Capote says he's collected enough drugs to stage his own Jonestown massacre, which occurred in November, 1978. Since the action passes during Christmas week of 1975, how could even the witty Tru have known about it three years in advance?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
It's no accident that Jean Brodie counts Mussolini and Franco among her models. The aging schoolteacher is an eccentric woman with a gift for moving young minds, but she's also something of a classroom fascist, not above dominating and manipulating her female students in the name of art and knowledge. She's not bad, she's just obsessive--Machiavelli with flash cards, Napoleon with an eraser. In "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" by Jay Presson Allen (based on Muriel Sparks' novel)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
Kill the Thing! Cut his throat! Spill his blood! ... Spill and kill and cut the MONSTER! Now! Now! Now! --"Lord of the Flies,"Hollywood-style The little ones are American, not British, this time. They worry less about upholding some prep school code than missing out on "Alf" and breakfast tacos. But the awful savagery of the story is coming to life again, with most of its frightening implications about evil that lurks in the hearts of children.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | KARI GRANVILLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is spring in New York, the Park Avenue apartment is warm with the afternoon sun, and Jay Presson Allen is annoyed. She is nursing a cold--and a grudge. Her cold has been aggravated by fumes left by carpet cleaners, which forced her retreat to a neighbor's home. Her mood has been aggravated by a powerful critic's disfavor, which, she believes, prompted her retreat from Broadway. The apartment "smells like Kuwait," the critic "is a plague." She does annoyance very well.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1986 | This chart is compiled by David Pecchia
Beginning production this week: THE MORNING AFTER (Lorimar/American Filmworks). Shooting in L.A. Murder-mystery with a dash of romance involving a hard-drinking ex-actress who goes on the run after being framed in a murder rap. Her estranged husband and an ex-cop eventually become entangled as well. Producer Bruce Gilbert. Director Sidney Lumet. Screenwriters J. Hicks, Jay Presson Allen and David Rayfiel. Stars Jane Fonda, Jeff Bridges and Raul Julia. Distributed by 20th Century Fox.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lewis Allen, 81, producer of the Broadway hit "Annie" and winner of three Tony Awards, died Monday of pancreatic cancer in New York City, his wife, writer Jay Presson Allen, said. "Annie" opened in 1977 and ran for six years. Allen won a Tony for it and for two plays he produced: Herb Gardner's "I'm Not Rappaport" in 1986 and Terrence McNally's "Master Class" in 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | KARI GRANVILLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is spring in New York, the Park Avenue apartment is warm with the afternoon sun, and Jay Presson Allen is annoyed. She is nursing a cold--and a grudge. Her cold has been aggravated by fumes left by carpet cleaners, which forced her retreat to a neighbor's home. Her mood has been aggravated by a powerful critic's disfavor, which, she believes, prompted her retreat from Broadway. The apartment "smells like Kuwait," the critic "is a plague." She does annoyance very well.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
True Stories: It is not a lie: The play "Tru" will return to Los Angeles a month after it leaves. Robert Morse will repeat his Tony Award-winning role of Truman Capote at the Henry Fonda Theatre beginning April 9. The Jay Presson Allen show closes its current run at the theater on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
It's no accident that Jean Brodie counts Mussolini and Franco among her models. The aging schoolteacher is an eccentric woman with a gift for moving young minds, but she's also something of a classroom fascist, not above dominating and manipulating her female students in the name of art and knowledge. She's not bad, she's just obsessive--Machiavelli with flash cards, Napoleon with an eraser. In "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" by Jay Presson Allen (based on Muriel Sparks' novel)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
Kill the Thing! Cut his throat! Spill his blood! ... Spill and kill and cut the MONSTER! Now! Now! Now! --"Lord of the Flies,"Hollywood-style The little ones are American, not British, this time. They worry less about upholding some prep school code than missing out on "Alf" and breakfast tacos. But the awful savagery of the story is coming to life again, with most of its frightening implications about evil that lurks in the hearts of children.
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