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Jay Price

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NEWS
March 18, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND
Mayor Jay Price remains hospitalized in fair condition after a stroke he suffered last mo we Relatives said that Price, 78, the oldest member of the City Council and the rglongest-standing elected official in Los Angeles County, is improving. "His vital signs are all good and his blood pressure going into surgery was near perfect," said his son, John. "At the present time, things are fairly positive. It will take some time for him to be weaned off the medications.
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NEWS
March 21, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND
Mayor Jay Price remains hospitalized in fair condition after suffering a stroke last weekend. Relatives said that Price, 78, the oldest member of the City Council and the longest-standing elected official in Los Angeles County, is improving. "His vital signs are all good and his blood pressure going into surgery was near perfect," said his son, John. "At the present time, things are fairly positive. It will take some time for him to be weaned off the medications.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2010 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The new boss kept his office spartan and impersonal, the walls stripped of photos, the desk conveying no hint of his life beyond the red-brick walls of City Hall. It was 1993, a bleak, recession-bit year, and Robert Rizzo arrived in Bell trailing the vague whiff of scandal. His last city administrator job, in the high desert city of Hesperia, had ended badly, with accusations that he'd steered city improvement funds toward salaries. But the Bell officials who hired him did not dig deeply into his past.
NEWS
February 20, 1986
An ordinance to increase council salaries was adopted 3-1 by the City Council Monday. The salaries were raised from $294 to $323 per month. Councilman Ray Johnson voted against the measure and Councilman Jay Price abstained. The increase will go into effect 30 days from Monday.
NEWS
April 15, 1993
Residents who want to apply for the vacant city clerk's job should submit a letter of interest and a resume to City Hall, 6330 Pine Ave., through April 22. The clerk's job, a part-time position that pays $6,900 a year, became vacant on April 5 when George Mirabal was appointed to the City Council following the death of Mayor Jay Price. Candidates must live in Bell, City Administrator John Bramble said. The council will interview applicants April 26 at City Hall.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND
Residents who want to apply for the vacant city clerk's job should submit a letter of interest and a resume to City Hall, 6330 Pine Ave., by April 22. The position became vacant April 5 when George Mirabal was appointed to the City Council to replace the late Mayor Jay Price. Candidates must live in Bell, but there are no other requirements, City Administrator John Bramble said. The council will interview candidates for the part-time $6,900-a-year post April 26 at City Hall.
SPORTS
May 10, 2003 | Steve Henson
Steve Lavin plans to discuss with Purdue Coach Gene Keady returning to the Boilermakers as an assistant. Lavin, the UCLA coach the last seven seasons and a Purdue graduate assistant from 1988 to '91, might want assurances he would become head coach when Keady, 66, retires in two or three years. "Because of my special feelings for Coach Keady, Purdue and greater Lafayette, this is one of the few places I would consider being an assistant coach," Lavin said.
NEWS
April 30, 1987
Veteran Councilman Jay Price was elected mayor of Bell Monday night, and George Mirabal was elected mayor pro tem. It is the sixth time Price has held the ceremonial office in his 29 years on the council. Price replaces outgoing Mayor George Cole. Price, 72, was elected to the first of his eight terms on the council in 1958. He was employed by the federal government for 40 years, 37 of them with the IRS.
NEWS
May 13, 1993
The City Council has selected Trish Casjens, a 28-year Bell resident, as city clerk. Casjens, a legal secretary, was selected from 11 applicants to replace George Mirabal, who was appointed to the council last month following the death of Mayor Jay B. Price. Casjens, who was sworn in Monday, will serve the remainder of Mirabal's term, which expires in 1996. She will be paid $575 a month to serve as the council secretary, compile and post City Council agendas and oversee city elections.
NEWS
October 13, 1985
The City Council has withdrawn an earlier approval that could have led to the development of a hazardous waste incinerator. In a 4-0 vote, with one member absent, the council, sitting as the Community Redevelopment Agency, rescinded a September decision to allow a private consulting firm, Mark Briggs and Associates, to study the possibility of building the waste plant as a way to generate additional city revenue, officials said.
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