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Jay Rosenblatt

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Rosenblatt is a little-known independent filmmaker whose hurrahs from critics ordinarily would cast him as an up-and-comer with a chance to make it in Hollywood. "Profoundly disturbing and imaginative," The Times' Kevin Thomas observed in 1996. "A ritualistic gravity that gathers force, so that by the end you feel the oppressive weight of the 20th century and begin to realize that many of its deepest mysteries can never be solved," wrote the New York Times' Stephen Holden last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Rosenblatt is a little-known independent filmmaker whose hurrahs from critics ordinarily would cast him as an up-and-comer with a chance to make it in Hollywood. "Profoundly disturbing and imaginative," The Times' Kevin Thomas observed in 1996. "A ritualistic gravity that gathers force, so that by the end you feel the oppressive weight of the 20th century and begin to realize that many of its deepest mysteries can never be solved," wrote the New York Times' Stephen Holden last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1996
The American Cinematheque's Alternative Screen series continues Thursday at 7 and 9 p.m. at Raleigh Studios' Chaplin Theater, 5300 Melrose Ave., Hollywood, with "Women's Roles: Barbies, Cowgirls, Housewives and Schizophrenics." Jay Rosenblatt and Jennifer Frame's "Period Piece," a documentary on the often taboo subject of menstruation, and J Clements' "Means of Grace," a portrait of a woman's descent into madness, screen at 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A previously unknown piano concerto by Franz Liszt is due to have its premiere next season by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, after being discovered and pieced together over the last nine months by Jay Rosenblatt, a Chicago musicologist. Rosenblatt found the work (tentatively dated from 1839) last April in Budapest, Hungary, while gathering materials for a doctoral dissertation on Liszt.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | MARY ANN HOGAN
Nesting takes many forms, whether the person is preparing for birth, death or life's experiences in-between. * A San Diego writer of children's books has to straighten her desk, iron her shirts, water her plants and tweak the dead leaves off before she can write. Says Georgeanne Irvine, "It's a necessary part of my process." * An Oakland woman about to undergo abdominal surgery spent her last moments fussing over household details.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1990 | From Reuters
A piano concerto written by virtuoso-composer Franz Liszt and lost to the world for more than a century and half will be played for the first time in public Thursday. The one-movement, 15-minute work in E flat major titled "Opus Posthumous" will be performed by Canadian soloist Janina Fialkowska with the Chicago Symphony under the direction of Kenneth Jean. "A few people have heard me practice it and their reaction has been astonishingly excited. I love the piece," Fialkowska said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
It seems that Franz Liszt wrote three piano concertos, circa 1839. The two we know he later revised, performed and published, while their sibling was left forgotten in subsequently dispersed manuscripts--until musicologist Jay Rosenblatt discovered and assembled them last winter. The new/old work, now the Piano Concerto No. 3 in E-flat, was premiered in Chicago in May.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1994
Filmforum, the alternative cinema showcase, begins its fall programming tonight at 7:30 at the Hollywood Moguls, 1650 Schrader St. (formerly Hudson), with the 80-minute "Home Is Where the Heart Is (Not)," composed of six intense and surreal short films expressing the trauma of childhood. Most impressive is Jay Rosenblatt's "The Smell of Burning Ants," in which he reprocesses found footage in a way to reveal how boys are conditioned to be aggressive, even sadistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1998
All day: Hockey Hockey at the beach? What's this? Well, the NHL has set out to convince America that Canadians are right--hockey is the coolest game on Earth. NHL Breakout '98 includes street and in-line hockey tournaments in inflatable rinks and various games to test your shooting, goal-tending and stick-handling skills. Olympic gold medalist Cammi Granato will also be on hand for four instructional clinics as part of the accompanying Women's Hockey Expo.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the World Trade Center fell, Jay Rosenblatt and Caveh Zahedi felt as if their usual creative obsessions as independent filmmakers suddenly didn't amount to a hill of beans. Zahedi had been shooting "I Am a Sex Addict," the latest in his series of features that focus on funny but disquieting episodes from his life. "I was feeling pretty absurd trying to make that film, and we were heading for World War III," he recalled. "It didn't seem very relevant."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of an otherwise negligible program of shorts, Filmforum presents Britta Sjogren's astonishing 18-minute "A Small Domain," a beautifully articulated vignette, light of touch yet shocking in impact, tonight at 8 at Glaxa Studios (3707 Sunset Blvd.). Sjogren first captures the rhythms of the daily routines of a self-sufficient, elderly woman who lives alone in a pleasant house with a lovingly tended garden.
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