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NEWS
August 28, 1995
Jay S. Garon, 71, New York literary agent who took on best-selling attorney-author John Grisham after 30 other agents refused. Born in Fall River, Mass., Garon attended UCLA and was a character actor in a few films, including "Dragon Seed" and "First Yank Into Tokyo." Moving to New York, he produced radio and television shows and a Broadway play, "Katake," before creating his literary agency in the 1950s.
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OPINION
July 21, 2010
One of the most shameful chapters in the war against terrorism was the complicity of George W. Bush's Justice Department in the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" — in plain language, torture — to extract information from suspected terrorists. Now the coauthor of two notorious 2002 memorandums issued by the department's Office of Legal Counsel has confirmed that interrogators transgressed even the minimal restrictions imposed by the memos. In an interview conducted by the House Judiciary Committee in May but released only last week, former Assistant Atty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council rescinded an honorary commendation Wednesday for retiring Detective Jay S. Paul after the panel was reminded of his role in a Los Angeles Police Department spying scandal more than a decade ago. The council nullified a unanimous vote taken Tuesday to present Paul with an honorary resolution, one of several routinely handed out to retiring city employees. After the vote, several members admitted that they did not realize whom they had honored.
HEALTH
November 26, 2001 | Linda Marsa
Side effects--or "adverse reactions"--from prescription medications kill more than 100,000 Americans--more than AIDS, alcohol, infectious diseases or auto accidents--and seriously injure 2 million others every year. Jay S. Cohen, a professor of medicine at UC San Diego, has written an eye-opening look at how drugs are developed in the United States, and a useful guide on how the average consumer can avoid becoming another statistic.
HEALTH
November 26, 2001 | Linda Marsa
Side effects--or "adverse reactions"--from prescription medications kill more than 100,000 Americans--more than AIDS, alcohol, infectious diseases or auto accidents--and seriously injure 2 million others every year. Jay S. Cohen, a professor of medicine at UC San Diego, has written an eye-opening look at how drugs are developed in the United States, and a useful guide on how the average consumer can avoid becoming another statistic.
OPINION
July 21, 2010
One of the most shameful chapters in the war against terrorism was the complicity of George W. Bush's Justice Department in the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" — in plain language, torture — to extract information from suspected terrorists. Now the coauthor of two notorious 2002 memorandums issued by the department's Office of Legal Counsel has confirmed that interrogators transgressed even the minimal restrictions imposed by the memos. In an interview conducted by the House Judiciary Committee in May but released only last week, former Assistant Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a decade ago, he was the central figure in a spying scandal that shook the Los Angeles Police Department. But on Tuesday the City Council voted to honor Detective Jay S. Paul, who is leaving the department and moving out of the state, with a routine but effusive retirement tribute that made no mention of the undoing of the infamous Public Disorder Intelligence Division. Instead, the proposal to honor Paul on Jan. 22 (his official retirement date) sticks to citing happier moments in the detective's 27-year career with the LAPD.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court on Tuesday unanimously overturned a Norwalk man's first-degree murder convictions for killing his estranged wife and an off-duty Los Angeles sheriff's deputy, ruling that detectives failed to properly advise him of his legal rights before he confessed. Reuben Kenneth Lujan was sentenced to life without parole for killing his estranged wife, Monica, 26, and her friend, Deputy Gilbert Madrigal, 45, by smashing their heads with a concrete block.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
The former Justice Department official who co-wrote the so-called torture memos testified that the department did not sanction some of the harsh methods the CIA used against detainees during the George W. Bush administration, including the repeated waterboarding of two suspected terrorists. Jay S. Bybee, former head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, said in testimony released Thursday by the House Judiciary Committee that the CIA went further in its tough tactics than he had outlined as permissible in a widely criticized legal memoranda.
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
American Red Cross blood processing centers repeatedly have failed federal inspections over the last 15 years and continue to have problems that present a "potential for harm" to patients, federal officials say. "The Red Cross [blood operation] is not in compliance with the current laws and regulations," said Dr. Jay S. Epstein of the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA said increasingly tough actions have failed to correct the problems.
NEWS
August 28, 1995
Jay S. Garon, 71, New York literary agent who took on best-selling attorney-author John Grisham after 30 other agents refused. Born in Fall River, Mass., Garon attended UCLA and was a character actor in a few films, including "Dragon Seed" and "First Yank Into Tokyo." Moving to New York, he produced radio and television shows and a Broadway play, "Katake," before creating his literary agency in the 1950s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council rescinded an honorary commendation Wednesday for retiring Detective Jay S. Paul after the panel was reminded of his role in a Los Angeles Police Department spying scandal more than a decade ago. The council nullified a unanimous vote taken Tuesday to present Paul with an honorary resolution, one of several routinely handed out to retiring city employees. After the vote, several members admitted that they did not realize whom they had honored.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a decade ago, he was the central figure in a spying scandal that shook the Los Angeles Police Department. But on Tuesday the City Council voted to honor Detective Jay S. Paul, who is leaving the department and moving out of the state, with a routine but effusive retirement tribute that made no mention of the undoing of the infamous Public Disorder Intelligence Division. Instead, the proposal to honor Paul on Jan. 22 (his official retirement date) sticks to citing happier moments in the detective's 27-year career with the LAPD.
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