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Jay S Bybee

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NEWS
November 17, 2009
Torture suit: An Oct. 28 article in Section A about the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals voting to rehear en banc the extraordinary-rendition case of Mohamed vs. Jeppesen DataPlan Inc. said that the published order "was unusual in its naming of judges who didn't take part in the vote, including Jay S. Bybee, the former Bush administration lawyer who wrote so-called torture memos." In fact, though judges recuse themselves in only a small fraction of such votes, they are always identified, said David Madden, assistant circuit executive.
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OPINION
November 16, 2010
The laughable notion that waterboarding and other "enhanced interrogation techniques" don't constitute torture is belied by the fact that the CIA in 2005 destroyed dozens of videotapes recording the interrogation of two suspected terrorists. Now a special federal prosecutor has declined to pursue criminal charges in connection with the tapes' destruction. John Durham, the prosecutor, may still decide to charge CIA officials with lying, and he also is probing whether the interrogations themselves violated Justice Department guidelines.
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OPINION
February 23, 2010
Arespected career Justice Department official has concluded that two George W. Bush administration lawyers who wrote memos authorizing the physical and psychological abuse of suspected terrorists didn't commit misconduct that would justify disbarring or disciplining them. But Associate Deputy Atty. Gen. David Margolis' report is far from a vindication for John C. Yoo and Jay S. Bybee's shamefully narrow interpretations of laws against torture and extravagant views about presidential power.
OPINION
July 21, 2010
One of the most shameful chapters in the war against terrorism was the complicity of George W. Bush's Justice Department in the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" — in plain language, torture — to extract information from suspected terrorists. Now the coauthor of two notorious 2002 memorandums issued by the department's Office of Legal Counsel has confirmed that interrogators transgressed even the minimal restrictions imposed by the memos. In an interview conducted by the House Judiciary Committee in May but released only last week, former Assistant Atty.
OPINION
November 16, 2010
The laughable notion that waterboarding and other "enhanced interrogation techniques" don't constitute torture is belied by the fact that the CIA in 2005 destroyed dozens of videotapes recording the interrogation of two suspected terrorists. Now a special federal prosecutor has declined to pursue criminal charges in connection with the tapes' destruction. John Durham, the prosecutor, may still decide to charge CIA officials with lying, and he also is probing whether the interrogations themselves violated Justice Department guidelines.
OPINION
July 2, 2009
In their notorious August 2002 "torture memo," Justice Department officials Jay S. Bybee and John C. Yoo defined torture narrowly as pain associated with "organ failure, impairment of bodily function, or even death." It was a strained and selective reading of the law, and it was rescinded in 2004 by Jack Goldsmith, Bybee's successor as head of the Office of Legal Counsel. But can Yoo, now a professor at UC Berkeley, be held responsible for the actions of others who relied on his legal reasoning?
NATIONAL
February 20, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano
An internal Justice Department report released Friday has concluded that although two former Bush administration lawyers used "poor judgment" in issuing legal memos authorizing waterboarding and other harsh interrogation tactics on terrorism suspects, they did not commit any professional misconduct. The report by the department's Office of Professional Responsibility noted that the lawyers did not purposely give bad legal advice to CIA interrogators and others dealing with suspects captured after the Sept.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2009 | Josh Meyer and Julian E. Barnes
Justice Department investigators have concluded that three Bush administration lawyers who wrote controversial interrogation memos should not face criminal charges, but that conduct by two of them was problematic enough to merit possible state disbarment or other disciplinary action, according to two sources familiar with a draft report.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
The former Justice Department official who co-wrote the so-called torture memos testified that the department did not sanction some of the harsh methods the CIA used against detainees during the George W. Bush administration, including the repeated waterboarding of two suspected terrorists. Jay S. Bybee, former head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, said in testimony released Thursday by the House Judiciary Committee that the CIA went further in its tough tactics than he had outlined as permissible in a widely criticized legal memoranda.
OPINION
July 21, 2010
One of the most shameful chapters in the war against terrorism was the complicity of George W. Bush's Justice Department in the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" — in plain language, torture — to extract information from suspected terrorists. Now the coauthor of two notorious 2002 memorandums issued by the department's Office of Legal Counsel has confirmed that interrogators transgressed even the minimal restrictions imposed by the memos. In an interview conducted by the House Judiciary Committee in May but released only last week, former Assistant Atty.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
The former Justice Department official who co-wrote the so-called torture memos testified that the department did not sanction some of the harsh methods the CIA used against detainees during the George W. Bush administration, including the repeated waterboarding of two suspected terrorists. Jay S. Bybee, former head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, said in testimony released Thursday by the House Judiciary Committee that the CIA went further in its tough tactics than he had outlined as permissible in a widely criticized legal memoranda.
OPINION
February 23, 2010
Arespected career Justice Department official has concluded that two George W. Bush administration lawyers who wrote memos authorizing the physical and psychological abuse of suspected terrorists didn't commit misconduct that would justify disbarring or disciplining them. But Associate Deputy Atty. Gen. David Margolis' report is far from a vindication for John C. Yoo and Jay S. Bybee's shamefully narrow interpretations of laws against torture and extravagant views about presidential power.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano
An internal Justice Department report released Friday has concluded that although two former Bush administration lawyers used "poor judgment" in issuing legal memos authorizing waterboarding and other harsh interrogation tactics on terrorism suspects, they did not commit any professional misconduct. The report by the department's Office of Professional Responsibility noted that the lawyers did not purposely give bad legal advice to CIA interrogators and others dealing with suspects captured after the Sept.
NEWS
November 17, 2009
Torture suit: An Oct. 28 article in Section A about the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals voting to rehear en banc the extraordinary-rendition case of Mohamed vs. Jeppesen DataPlan Inc. said that the published order "was unusual in its naming of judges who didn't take part in the vote, including Jay S. Bybee, the former Bush administration lawyer who wrote so-called torture memos." In fact, though judges recuse themselves in only a small fraction of such votes, they are always identified, said David Madden, assistant circuit executive.
OPINION
July 2, 2009
In their notorious August 2002 "torture memo," Justice Department officials Jay S. Bybee and John C. Yoo defined torture narrowly as pain associated with "organ failure, impairment of bodily function, or even death." It was a strained and selective reading of the law, and it was rescinded in 2004 by Jack Goldsmith, Bybee's successor as head of the Office of Legal Counsel. But can Yoo, now a professor at UC Berkeley, be held responsible for the actions of others who relied on his legal reasoning?
NATIONAL
May 6, 2009 | Josh Meyer and Julian E. Barnes
Justice Department investigators have concluded that three Bush administration lawyers who wrote controversial interrogation memos should not face criminal charges, but that conduct by two of them was problematic enough to merit possible state disbarment or other disciplinary action, according to two sources familiar with a draft report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court on Tuesday unanimously overturned a Norwalk man's first-degree murder convictions for killing his estranged wife and an off-duty Los Angeles sheriff's deputy, ruling that detectives failed to properly advise him of his legal rights before he confessed. Reuben Kenneth Lujan was sentenced to life without parole for killing his estranged wife, Monica, 26, and her friend, Deputy Gilbert Madrigal, 45, by smashing their heads with a concrete block.
OPINION
January 13, 2003
There are at least two explanations -- one even more cynical than the other -- for President Bush's renomination last week of Judge Charles W. Pickering, a man the Senate rightly rejected last year for a seat on the federal appeals court. Perhaps Bush really didn't mean it last month when he denounced as "offensive ... and wrong" Mississippi Sen. Trent Lott's nostalgic musings about the segregated South.
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