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BUSINESS
October 1, 1990 | ALAN CITRON
In a move to strengthen management of its theme parks and other recreation areas, MCA Inc. has named Jay S. Stein chairman and chief executive of its recreation services group. In conjunction, Ron Bension has been named president and chief operating officer of the group. Stein, 53, who formerly served as president of recreation services, said the company remains committed to opening Universal Studios theme parks in Europe and Japan.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
The chief executive of Cineplex Odeon Corp., which is co-financing a new Florida studio tour attraction with MCA Inc., on Thursday corroborated an MCA executive's story that Walt Disney Co. had offered to drop plans to build a Burbank entertainment complex if MCA would abandon its proposed theme park near Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla. The original accusation, made earlier this week by MCA Vice President Jay S. Stein, has been denied by top Disney officials.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Playwright and actor Bernard Baldan rolls his eyes at mention of the phrase "midlife crisis." He says his new play, "The Boise Club," which opens Thursday in a world premiere by the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach, is definitely not about that. "It's about change," he says above the clatter of dishes and the hum of breakfast conversations at a busy diner here. "Midlife crisis is just a label for almost anything that goes wrong with anybody over the age of 20. It's one of these catchall phrases."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1987 | GREG BRAXTON, Times Staff Writer
Burbank Mayor Michael R. Hastings on Friday denied an accusation that the city sabotaged a rival entertainment giant's efforts to bid on a 40-acre redevelopment site on which Walt Disney Co. now plans to build an elaborate entertainment and retail complex. Hastings said the rival company, MCA, is at fault for not aggressively seeking the project. "Contrary to the accusations, MCA was not locked out, and there was not a snow job," he said. MCA Vice President Jay S.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
MCA, which has long sought to build a Japanese theme park similar to its Universal Studios Tour, announced Thursday that it has found a partner in Nippon Steel Corp. of Japan to develop a "Universal Studios Japan." No site or construction schedule was divulged, but Nippon--the world's largest steel company--owns large parcels of land throughout Japan surrounding its 10 steel mills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1987 | GREG BRAXTON and KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writers
The Walt Disney Co. was given the go-ahead Tuesday to plan an elaborate theme park, shopping mall and "Hollywood Fantasy Hotel" for a 40-acre redevelopment site in downtown Burbank. Over the protests of a rival entertainment giant, the Burbank City Council voted unanimously to give Disney an option to buy the land for $1 million--which city officials admitted is a bargain price--to develop what would be called "The Disney-MGM Studio Backlot" at a cost of from $150 million to $300 million.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
A simmering quarrel between two giant entertainment companies boiled over Wednesday when a high-ranking MCA official accused Walt Disney Co. of using "blackmail tactics" to maintain its dominance in the Florida theme-park business. MCA's fury was touched off by a Disney proposal to build a $150-million to $300- million entertainment complex and tourist attraction in Burbank, just a few miles from MCA's own Universal Studios Tour attraction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1987 | GREG BRAXTON and KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writers
The Walt Disney Co. was given the go-ahead Tuesday to plan an elaborate theme park, shopping mall and "Hollywood Fantasy Hotel" for a 40-acre redevelopment site in downtown Burbank. Over the protests of a rival entertainment giant, the Burbank City Council voted unanimously to give Disney an option to buy the land for $1 million--which city officials acknowledged is a bargain price--to develop what would be called "The Disney-MGM Studio Backlot" at a cost of $150 million to $300 million.
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