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Jay Tarses

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | PETER MARKS, NEWSDAY
Standing on a stage strewn with cables and sawdust, 3,000 miles from the city of his tortured dreams, Jay Tarses is a kid again. He can hardly believe how untroubled, how completely at ease he is in this tiny theater above 42nd Street, how much he loves everything about it: the actors, the director, the $750 set. Even, God forgive him, the management. "It's rapture. It's heaven.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, Jay Tarses--disenchanted by what he deemed shoddy treatment of his latest TV series--threatened to chuck it all. He'd written an off-Broadway play, "Man in His Underwear," and joked about buying into a baseball team and retiring to Idaho.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Jay Tarses, creator of the brooding but critically acclaimed "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd," on Brandon Tartikoff and his top-rated network after "Molly" once again failed to make NBC's fall schedule: "They have 'No. 1' parties over there. They put on their devil outfits and dance around a bonfire and throw people with college educations into a pit or something."
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, Ted Johnson is a frequent contributor to TV Times
"Black Tie Affair" draws elements from any of several dozen audience-grabbing thrillers the networks churn out routinely these days as movies of the week: lots of sex, tension and, of course, a murder plot. But this show is also a comedy. The series, which made its bow last Saturday, is the brainchild of Jay Tarses, the producer-writer behind the critically acclaimed "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd" and "Buffalo Bill."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
From Smoldering to Inflamed: Jay Tarses, creator of a comedy series that debuts on NBC May 29, lashed out at the network Tuesday for deciding this week to change the title from "Smoldering Lust" to "A Black Tie Affair." "NBC has not only violated my creative rights but has driven a stake into the heart of this show," Tarses said, complaining that the new title "has nothing to do with the series." The series stars Kate Capshaw as a married woman who lusts for a detective.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Creative differences between producer and star, not ABC's lack of artistic sensitivity, led to the demise of ABC's first-season dramedy "The 'Slap' Maxwell Story," said ABC Entertainment President Brandon Stoddard on Thursday. At an informal press conference, Stoddard responded to published complaints by " 'Slap' Maxwell" producer Jay Tarses about the show's being dropped off the fall schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Times Television Critic
Emmythoughts II. . . . Sunday's Emmycast on Fox Broadcasting honored something interesting in modern TV--the overlapping of comedy and drama. No wonder the Emmy-giving Television Academy of Arts & Sciences was confronted by a truth-in-labeling problem. Michael J. Fox received an Emmy as best actor in a comedy series for NBC's "Family Ties," for example, largely for an episode about his reflections on the death of a friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, Jay Tarses--disenchanted by what he deemed shoddy treatment of his latest TV series--threatened to chuck it all. He'd written an off-Broadway play, "Man in His Underwear," and joked about buying into a baseball team and retiring to Idaho.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1991 | NEIL KOCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Koch is former West Coast editor of Channels magazine
"In the late 1940s I collaborated on a short-lived (four performances), long-forgotten revue for the Los Angeles stage called 'My L.A.' " So begins playwright-screenwriter-television writer Larry Gelbart's program notes for his Tony-winning "City of Angels," now midway through its four-month run at the Shubert and still running on Broadway where it's been for the last two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1987 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Jay Tarses used to write jokes for a living. Now he makes people squirm when they watch TV. "I like to make them do something ," says Tarses, creator of the unorthodox television comedies "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd" and "The 'Slap' Maxwell Story." "Making people squirm is better than letting them sit there doing nothing--like oatmeal."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
From Smoldering to Inflamed: Jay Tarses, creator of a comedy series that debuts on NBC May 29, lashed out at the network Tuesday for deciding this week to change the title from "Smoldering Lust" to "A Black Tie Affair." "NBC has not only violated my creative rights but has driven a stake into the heart of this show," Tarses said, complaining that the new title "has nothing to do with the series." The series stars Kate Capshaw as a married woman who lusts for a detective.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | PETER MARKS, NEWSDAY
Standing on a stage strewn with cables and sawdust, 3,000 miles from the city of his tortured dreams, Jay Tarses is a kid again. He can hardly believe how untroubled, how completely at ease he is in this tiny theater above 42nd Street, how much he loves everything about it: the actors, the director, the $750 set. Even, God forgive him, the management. "It's rapture. It's heaven.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1991 | NEIL KOCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Koch is former West Coast editor of Channels magazine
"In the late 1940s I collaborated on a short-lived (four performances), long-forgotten revue for the Los Angeles stage called 'My L.A.' " So begins playwright-screenwriter-television writer Larry Gelbart's program notes for his Tony-winning "City of Angels," now midway through its four-month run at the Shubert and still running on Broadway where it's been for the last two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1991
Thanks for the great article (" 'Military Expert' Has a Gap in His Credentials" by Mark I. Pinsky, April 1) about the alleged military expert Andy Lightbody. It appears Lightbody did a Milli Vanilli emulation on the media as well as the public. I was wondering where all those "expert military analysts" suddenly came from. Perhaps the peace activists are correct when they claim the media was given inaccurate and misleading facts during the Gulf crisis.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Creative differences between producer and star, not ABC's lack of artistic sensitivity, led to the demise of ABC's first-season dramedy "The 'Slap' Maxwell Story," said ABC Entertainment President Brandon Stoddard on Thursday. At an informal press conference, Stoddard responded to published complaints by " 'Slap' Maxwell" producer Jay Tarses about the show's being dropped off the fall schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Jay Tarses, creator of the brooding but critically acclaimed "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd," on Brandon Tartikoff and his top-rated network after "Molly" once again failed to make NBC's fall schedule: "They have 'No. 1' parties over there. They put on their devil outfits and dance around a bonfire and throw people with college educations into a pit or something."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The TV season's boldest development in prime time has been the emergence of such series as "Frank's Place" on CBS and "The 'Slap' Maxwell Story" on ABC, gorgeously written and executed half-hours that blur the line between drama and comedy. In every episode, there's at least a little bit of magic. And as a bonus, no laugh track. Other shows have larger audiences. But these are "Hey-did-you-see" series: "Hey, did you see 'Frank's Place' last night?"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1991
Thanks for the great article (" 'Military Expert' Has a Gap in His Credentials" by Mark I. Pinsky, April 1) about the alleged military expert Andy Lightbody. It appears Lightbody did a Milli Vanilli emulation on the media as well as the public. I was wondering where all those "expert military analysts" suddenly came from. Perhaps the peace activists are correct when they claim the media was given inaccurate and misleading facts during the Gulf crisis.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The TV season's boldest development in prime time has been the emergence of such series as "Frank's Place" on CBS and "The 'Slap' Maxwell Story" on ABC, gorgeously written and executed half-hours that blur the line between drama and comedy. In every episode, there's at least a little bit of magic. And as a bonus, no laugh track. Other shows have larger audiences. But these are "Hey-did-you-see" series: "Hey, did you see 'Frank's Place' last night?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1987 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Jay Tarses used to write jokes for a living. Now he makes people squirm when they watch TV. "I like to make them do something ," says Tarses, creator of the unorthodox television comedies "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd" and "The 'Slap' Maxwell Story." "Making people squirm is better than letting them sit there doing nothing--like oatmeal."
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