Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJay Ward
IN THE NEWS

Jay Ward

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
October 15, 1989
Jay Ward understood that cartoons were not meant to be monopolized by children. The good ones, which Ward was a master at creating, worked at two levels: one direct and another wonderfully satiric. Ward, who died last week at age 69 at his home in West Hollywood, created a rich collection of animated fun that is an automatic reference point for millions of baby boomers who grew up when television still seemed a sort of magical living room box.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Tuna, a Chiweenie with an overbite and more than 700,000 followers on Instagram, was there. So were Lassie, Rin Tin Tin, Beethoven, Marley, Toto and several other dogs of renown. The canine A-list had gathered in Hollywood in February to celebrate one of their own. Yes, they had also come because their trainers were tossing bits of hot dog onto the red carpet, but really, the main attraction was Mr. Peabody, the hyper-intelligent, time-traveling beagle from the 1960s cartoon shorts "Peabody's Improbable History," who was getting his paw prints enshrined at the TCL Chinese Theatre.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Ward, who sired a collection of characters dominated by a squirrel named Rocky and a simple-minded moose he called Bullwinkle, and then put them in a TV series that featured primitive animation and sophisticated dialogue, died Thursday. The creator of Boris Badenov, Natasha Fatale, Dudley Do-Right, Snidely Whiplash and, of course, Bullwinkle and Rocky was 69 and died at his home in the West Hollywood area.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Decades before Dos Equis introduced the most interesting man in the world via a beer commercial, that title might have belonged to a dog - a debonair, bow tie-wearing, Harvard-educated cartoon beagle named Mr. Peabody. The star of "Peabody's Improbable History," a series of six-minute animated segments that appeared alongside producer Jay Ward's "Rocky and Bullwinkle" cartoons starting in 1959, Mr. Peabody spoke eight languages, worked on government science projects and bore the moniker "The Woof of Wall Street" for his knack with stocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1991 | RANDY LEWIS
The one disappointment for me in tonight's PBS special "Of Moose and Men: The Rocky and Bullwinkle Story" is that the producers weren't able to include any archival interview footage of the show's creator, Jay Ward. Such material might have made the mysterious Ward a little more real to the legions of us baby-boomers who grew up with the moose and squirrel. So it's disappointing. But surprising? Not at all. Ward, who died in 1989, was notoriously reclusive.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2008 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
Jay Ward was my first auteur. Even as a little fellow, I understood that his cartoons were different from other cartoons, even from the ones -- like "Underdog" and "King Leonardo" -- that were made to resemble them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1988 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
There was this squirrel. He had a boyish voice and wore an old-time aviator cap with goggles. He had a tall friend, this moose, who had the voice of a galoot. Together they escaped extraordinary mishaps en route to making the world safe for democracy, usually by thwarting the sinister plans of a couple of Slavic schemers, a squat fellow named Boris and a slinky woman named Natasha. The heroes were Rocky and Bullwinkle. No one who has seen them seems able to forget them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Dudley Do-Right" isn't the only popular Jay Ward creation coming to movie theaters today. Accompanying the Universal live-action comedy (starring Brendan Fraser as the dashing Royal Canadian mounted do-gooder) is a new animated short rescued from the files of "Fractured Fairy Tales." Which means "The Phox, the Box & the Lox" isn't altogether new.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tiffany Ward sees herself as caretaker of her father's legacy and a stickler for detail. "It's my responsibility to see that the ideals of the family are carried on," said Ward, executive producer of "The Rocky & Bullwinkle Movie." "That the look and feel remain true to the spirit of my father's original characters is absolutely essential," Ward said. For instance, the animated/live action movie features June Foray--the original voice of Rocky.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | ROBERT MARSH
Watch me pull a Bullwinkle outta my hat . . . . Or outta my VCR, at least. Yes, back from the past are Rocket J. Squirrel, Bullwinkle J. Moose, Boris, Natasha, even Dudley Do-Right and his trusty horse. And the most joyous news of all--they are every bit as funny as you remember them. Buena Vista Home Video recently released six tapes, each a treasure trove of classics from the Jay Ward studios, each under the name of a classic painting or artist (well, almost). You'll find Vol.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2008 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
Jay Ward was my first auteur. Even as a little fellow, I understood that his cartoons were different from other cartoons, even from the ones -- like "Underdog" and "King Leonardo" -- that were made to resemble them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
When we last saw the intrepid Rocket J. Squirrel and Bullwinkle the talking moose, the two most famous residents of Frostbite Falls, they had faded into a pinkish-purple hue and were in dire need of restoration. Enter Tiffany Ward, the daughter of "Rocky and Bullwinkle" creator Jay Ward, who spent the last six years restoring her father's beloved cartoon series. As they might've said on the show: Hokey smokes!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Dudley Do-Right" isn't the only popular Jay Ward creation coming to movie theaters today. Accompanying the Universal live-action comedy (starring Brendan Fraser as the dashing Royal Canadian mounted do-gooder) is a new animated short rescued from the files of "Fractured Fairy Tales." Which means "The Phox, the Box & the Lox" isn't altogether new.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Placard-carrying hecklers were aswarm on Chapman University's quad as a distinguished, silver-haired man stepped to the podium. They booed and hissed as the university president motioned to his companion on the dais. "We present this honorary degree to . . . Bullwinkle the Moose." "Good morning, children!" the familiar galumphing voice rang out. The protesters waved signs that read "Noose the Moose" and "A Wolf in Moose Clothing," all the while showing their displeasure at "Mooster Know-It-All."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tiffany Ward sees herself as caretaker of her father's legacy and a stickler for detail. "It's my responsibility to see that the ideals of the family are carried on," said Ward, executive producer of "The Rocky & Bullwinkle Movie." "That the look and feel remain true to the spirit of my father's original characters is absolutely essential," Ward said. For instance, the animated/live action movie features June Foray--the original voice of Rocky.
SPORTS
October 11, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bo Jackson slammed the bat into his left hand, spun around, and jumped into the air Sunday, screaming obscenities into the night. It was the pitch of a lifetime, the pitch that not only could have made Jackson filthy rich in further endorsements, but put the Chicago White Sox a step closer to their first World Series appearance since 1959. This time, there was no dramatic homer. Only another forgettable strikeout.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1991 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"Of Moose and Men: The Rocky and Bullwinkle Story," which airs at 8:45 tonight on KCET Channel 28, pays gleeful tribute to the most beloved and imaginative cartoon show of the baby-boom era. Director Marino Amoruso and producer Benjamin Magliano (who also co-wrote the special) have assembled a collage of clips from various adventures and interviews with writers Allan Burns and Chris Hayward, director Bill Hurtz, voice actors June Foray and William Conrad, and publicist Howard Brandy.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bullwinkle J. Moose and Rocket J. Squirrel are taking their act to Universal City. MCA Inc., parent of Universal Studios, has acquired worldwide merchandising and theme park rights to the slightly bent Bullwinkle cartoon crowd in a long-term deal with the heirs of creator Jay Ward. MCA expects to have Bullwinkle merchandise in stores by Christmas.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bullwinkle J. Moose and Rocket J. Squirrel are taking their act to Universal City. MCA Inc., parent of Universal Studios, has acquired worldwide merchandising and theme park rights to the slightly bent Bullwinkle cartoon crowd in a long-term deal with the heirs of creator Jay Ward. MCA expects to have Bullwinkle merchandise in stores by Christmas.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | ROBERT MARSH
Watch me pull a Bullwinkle outta my hat . . . . Or outta my VCR, at least. Yes, back from the past are Rocket J. Squirrel, Bullwinkle J. Moose, Boris, Natasha, even Dudley Do-Right and his trusty horse. And the most joyous news of all--they are every bit as funny as you remember them. Buena Vista Home Video recently released six tapes, each a treasure trove of classics from the Jay Ward studios, each under the name of a classic painting or artist (well, almost). You'll find Vol.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|