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Jayne Hitchcock

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NEWS
February 10, 1997 | JACK MINGO
While not common, harassment is a fact of life on the Internet. Rarely, however, does it spill over into offline life. Most of it consists of "flame wars," the bombardment of a user with hostile, abusive language in public postings or via private e-mail. More elaborate tricks such as "mail bombing" (arranging a flood of junk mail that will crash a user's computer) happen very rarely and are considered extremely unethical by most "netizens."
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NEWS
February 10, 1997 | JACK MINGO
While not common, harassment is a fact of life on the Internet. Rarely, however, does it spill over into offline life. Most of it consists of "flame wars," the bombardment of a user with hostile, abusive language in public postings or via private e-mail. More elaborate tricks such as "mail bombing" (arranging a flood of junk mail that will crash a user's computer) happen very rarely and are considered extremely unethical by most "netizens."
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NEWS
February 10, 1997 | JACK MINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The harassment started on Dec. 20. Jayne Hitchcock and husband Chris were hosting a holiday dinner for friends when they began receiving mysterious phone calls. Some were hang-ups, but others were odd--"Loverboy" calling collect from somewhere or a student from Germany wanting, he said in halting English, to discuss his sexual fantasies. "It became terrifying," recalls Jayne Hitchcock, an author of six nonfiction and kids' books who lives in Crofton, Md. "We had no idea what was going on."
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | JACK MINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The harassment started on Dec. 20. Jayne Hitchcock and husband Chris were hosting a holiday dinner for friends when they began receiving mysterious phone calls. Some were hang-ups, but others were odd--"Loverboy" calling collect from somewhere or a student from Germany wanting, he said in halting English, to discuss his sexual fantasies. "It became terrifying," recalls Jayne Hitchcock, an author of six nonfiction and kids' books who lives in Crofton, Md. "We had no idea what was going on."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997
The nightmarish harassment of author Jayne Hitchcock, detailed in The Times on Monday, demonstrates that there are things to remember while foraging the Internet. Among them: trust your instincts. Stay clear of any web site, person, group or alleged business that gives even the slightest hint of something awry. This case involves Net "newsgroups" that allow users to read messages and post electronic replies.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2008 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- All is not lovey-dovey in the high-stakes online dating industry. The contentious issue of the moment -- pitting one of the three biggest companies, True .com, against its major rivals -- is whether online dating services can enhance their clients' safety by conducting criminal background screenings of would-be daters. Last month, New Jersey became the first state to enact a law requiring the sites to disclose whether they perform background checks. True.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | JOHN HENDREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jayne Hitchcock never imagined she would become the poster child for the movement to ban online harassment. Then she logged onto the Internet to warn other writers about a New York literary agency she thought was conning her by asking for $225 to review her book. As The Times reported in February, she was soon "mail bombed" with more than 200 electronic mail missives.
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