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Jaywalking

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OPINION
December 18, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A crackdown on jaywalking has stirred up a fierce debate over when you can and cannot cross the street in Los Angeles. A Downtown News story last week reported that Los Angeles police officers have been ticketing jaywalkers in the city's historic core and the financial district. Penalties range from a hefty $190 to an even heftier $250. "We're heavily enforcing pedestrian violations because they're impeding traffic and causing too many accidents and deaths," Lt. Lydia Leos told the newspaper.
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NATIONAL
January 29, 2014 | By Tina Susman
Mayor Bill De Blasio had been in office just one day when it happened: A 53-year-old man was hit and killed by a van while crossing a Queens street in the early evening. Eight days later, it happened again, this time on Manhattan's Upper West Side. In a 24-hour period, vehicles hit three people in two separate incidents in that neighborhood. Two of the pedestrians died, including a 9-year-old boy walking with his father. So far this year, at least 12 people have died after being hit by taxis, tour buses, delivery vans, trucks, personal vehicles and even an ambulance on New York streets, prompting city officials to launch a war on what many consider a way of life here: aggressive driving and jaywalking.  "It's an epidemic we're facing," said De Blasio , whose Vision Zero plan aims to eliminate traffic fatalities within 10 years.  That's easier said than done in a city of more than 8 million people, where cars, bicycles, roller bladers and pedestrians battle for space on crowded streets and sidewalks, and where locals impatiently weave around visitors who stand at curbs waiting for the red hand signal to turn green.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1988
Greenfeld's column so reminded me of an incident which occurred to me one afternoon more than four years ago. It was the unbearably hot Olympic summer of 1984 and I was a large seven months pregnant with my first child. I was returning to my car, which I had parked in the middle of a very long block of La Brea Avenue to go to an art supply store directly across the street. Rather than waddle all the way to the corner in the humid heat, I committed the sin of jaywalking. After carefully ascertaining that there was no traffic in either direction, I crossed and was opening the car door when an enormous motorcycle policeman roared up, his face hidden behind mirror glasses and a helmet.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has inadvertently stepped into - or should we say, driven into - L.A.'s jaywalking ticket controversy. On Tuesday, the mayor was being driven to City Hall when his official car, a black SUV, struck a pedestrian on Second Street near Spring Street. The woman in her 60s was taken to the hospital as a precaution. The mayor was on the phone at the time and apparently didn't see the accident. The collision comes a few weeks after the Downtown News first reported on a jaywalking crackdown in the city's Historic Core and the Financial District, in which Los Angeles police officers are ticketing walkers who step into the street during the “countdown.” What many walkers (including me)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1988
I had to laugh, with sadness, when I read the letter from Sara Arditti. It seems a big bad motorcycle cop "had nothing better to do" than cite her for jaywalking, even though she was seven months pregnant. Sara, I am an L.A. motor cop, and a few years ago, between writing tickets to pregnant women and men with white canes with red tips, I received a traffic accident call on La Brea. When I arrived, I was met by the paramedics, who informed me that a pedestrian, a pregnant woman, had been hit trying to cross La Brea, mid-block.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1985 | MATT DAMSKER
Once Horton Plaza opens in August, nobody's going to pay much attention to all those decorative pavers being installed on the nearby streets and crosswalks. But right now this street-improvement effort has emerged as the Great Downtown Obstacle to Pedestrian and Vehicular Ease--or, more bureaucratically, the GDOPVE.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2014 | By Tina Susman
Mayor Bill De Blasio had been in office just one day when it happened: A 53-year-old man was hit and killed by a van while crossing a Queens street in the early evening. Eight days later, it happened again, this time on Manhattan's Upper West Side. In a 24-hour period, vehicles hit three people in two separate incidents in that neighborhood. Two of the pedestrians died, including a 9-year-old boy walking with his father. So far this year, at least 12 people have died after being hit by taxis, tour buses, delivery vans, trucks, personal vehicles and even an ambulance on New York streets, prompting city officials to launch a war on what many consider a way of life here: aggressive driving and jaywalking.  "It's an epidemic we're facing," said De Blasio , whose Vision Zero plan aims to eliminate traffic fatalities within 10 years.  That's easier said than done in a city of more than 8 million people, where cars, bicycles, roller bladers and pedestrians battle for space on crowded streets and sidewalks, and where locals impatiently weave around visitors who stand at curbs waiting for the red hand signal to turn green.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | ROBERT A. JONES
After 20 years in this city, I have finally been made the butt of L.A.'s small joke on the unwary and uninitiated. Crossing an otherwise deserted street on an otherwise fine and sunny day about a week ago, I heard a siren wail somewhere behind me. Without looking, I knew my fate. I had been busted for jaywalking. So there I stood on the sidewalk, making a fig leaf with my hands, while a cop the size of a rodeo bull brought me to justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
A Ventura man has filed a brutality complaint with the city's Police Department, alleging he was beaten by an officer after being stopped for jaywalking. Duane Stanford, 42, was walking across Telephone Road near Jasper Avenue about 8 p.m. May 5 when he was confronted by Officer Jeff Brooks, according to Earnest Bell, Stanford's attorney. Concerned because Brooks had a baton, Stanford attempted to flee but was chased down and beaten with the baton, Bell said.
OPINION
June 8, 2008
Re "9-year-old boy killed," June 5 Hit-and-run is a crime, and rightfully so, especially when injury or death results. That said, jaywalking is illegal for a reason. The laws help to protect pedestrians by giving them guidelines for dealing safely with the potential lethal weapons driving down our roads. I was taught to look both ways and cross only in crosswalks when the signal allowed. Today, many people use the streets as pedestrian walkways. They assume vehicles will see them and stop.
OPINION
December 22, 2013
Re "Over the line on jaywalking," Editorial, Dec. 18 Now that jaywalking ticketing has moved west of skid row, there's suddenly an outcry. This is not a new issue to homeless advocates, since jaywalking ticketing became the centerpiece of the Safer City Initiative in 2006. At that time the city put extra officers in skid row to hand out about 1,000 tickets a month to homeless and low-income residents who could never afford to pay the fines. The recipients of these tickets risk losing housing and government benefits when they go to warrant.
OPINION
December 18, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A crackdown on jaywalking has stirred up a fierce debate over when you can and cannot cross the street in Los Angeles. A Downtown News story last week reported that Los Angeles police officers have been ticketing jaywalkers in the city's historic core and the financial district. Penalties range from a hefty $190 to an even heftier $250. "We're heavily enforcing pedestrian violations because they're impeding traffic and causing too many accidents and deaths," Lt. Lydia Leos told the newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | Sandy Banks
I expected to hear from pedestrians, criticizing careless drivers and sharing tales of near-tragedies after my column last week. I had written about a mother's tribute to her teenage son, whose death while crossing a busy street launched her on a mission to battle distracted driving. But most of the readers I heard from took a different tack: Drivers aren't the only or even primary problem. Pedestrians are responsible for their own safety - and I'd missed a chance to educate them about the stupid things they do. "Many, if not most, of the pedestrians and bicyclists that get hit (and often die)
NEWS
October 19, 2012
It's among every parent's worst nightmares: You turn your back for just a second, and suddenly your child is in the middle of the street. According to a new study, those worries are not unfounded: Jaywalking and darting into the street are the most common reasons children are struck by vehicles, according to a study released at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans. More than 5,000 Americans of all ages are struck and killed by cars every year, and many more accidents lead to significant head injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum
In a sting aimed at curbing accidents along the Blue Line, police and sheriff's deputies staked out a two-mile stretch of the line's tracks in downtown Los Angeles on Wednesday and ticketed nearly 300 jaywalkers and drivers they caught using cellphones and making illegal left turns. Transportation officials said the crackdown was the latest effort in a push to improve safety along the Blue Line, the city's oldest and most popular light rail line but also its most dangerous. Ninety-nine people have died in accidents and suicides involving the line in the nearly 20 years since the service from Los Angeles to Long Beach began.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2009 | Scott Collins
Jay Leno is still tinkering with the format behind his new 10 p.m. talk show that premieres next month. But viewers should get ready for one change: There'll probably be less Jay than on "The Tonight Show." Leno told reporters at a news conference in Burbank Wednesday that "The Jay Leno Show" will still start with a monologue tied to the day's news, and he'll still have familiar segments like Jaywalking and weird headlines. But, in lieu of the interviews that occupy most of "Tonight" and other late shows, Leno will spend a lot of time highlighting taped pieces by younger comics such as D.L. Hughley, Liz Feldman and Mikey Day. "I hope we can make some stars in this," Leno said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2009 | Eric Bailey and Patrick McGreevy
Errant motorists beware: Puppy hit-and-run could soon be a crime. Pushing animal rights in a new direction, a state lawmaker has proposed slapping California motorists with a fine and possible jail time if they flee after hitting a jaywalking dog, cat or any other pet or farm animal. The measure by Mike Eng (D-Monterey Park) would require that drivers attempt to provide aid to an injured critter and notify the owner or animal-control authorities.
OPINION
June 8, 2008
Re "9-year-old boy killed," June 5 Hit-and-run is a crime, and rightfully so, especially when injury or death results. That said, jaywalking is illegal for a reason. The laws help to protect pedestrians by giving them guidelines for dealing safely with the potential lethal weapons driving down our roads. I was taught to look both ways and cross only in crosswalks when the signal allowed. Today, many people use the streets as pedestrian walkways. They assume vehicles will see them and stop.
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