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Jazz Butcher

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1986 | STEVE HOCHMAN
"Don't forget they only make pop records out of plastic," the chap who calls himself the Jazz Butcher sang Thursday at the Roxy. The message: no point in taking this too seriously. Yet the Butcher and his three-member group Sikkorskis From Hell demonstrated enough wit to make their music more than just the stuff of good times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listening to the Jazz Butcher's two most recent albums, it's clear that the 34-year-old Englishman has done his time on the emotional chopping block. In fact, parts of "Cult of the Basement," from 1990, and most of the aptly named new release, "Condition Blue," are so downcast that one can imagine some particularly softhearted rock fan going up to the Butcher after a show and inviting the poor chap home for a nice, comforting bowl of chicken soup. Better make that a nice bowl of vegetable soup.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1988 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Pat Fish, leader of the English quartet the Jazz Butcher, seems to be afflicted with the kind of edgy intelligence that leaves him feeling vaguely embarrassed to find himself in show business. The favored solution to this quandary is the ever-popular ironic stance, and yes, at the Roxy on Thursday Fish and company came across with so much droll sarcasm that one imagines they probably lace their shoes with irony.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1990 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
Any way you slice it, the Jazz Butcher plays vivid, gregarious pop that owes little to the musical genre spotlighted in its name, other than a few token saxophone wails. The unfortunate moniker is probably partially responsible for keeping the British band from more widespread popularity. College radio enthusiasts of the sort who might otherwise be drawn to the group's music generally consider jazz anathema and keep their distance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
If names told the whole story, the Jazz Butcher could be a pretty tremendous group. Suggesting as it does the savaging of a rich and varied art form, the title well might lead one to expect some pretty impressive rubble to be left in this band's wake. Alas, in a world where governments can't even get accurate labeling from the food industry, it may be some time before we get around to truth-in-advertising legislation for rock acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"BLOODY NONSENSE." The Jazz Butcher. Big Time. On the tongue-in-cheek evidence presented here, this arty London quartet has highly ambivalent feelings about being in the music business, and it reconciles that conflict by making pure pop for wiseacres--it's sort of a joke band, but not quite.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listening to the Jazz Butcher's two most recent albums, it's clear that the 34-year-old Englishman has done his time on the emotional chopping block. In fact, parts of "Cult of the Basement," from 1990, and most of the aptly named new release, "Condition Blue," are so downcast that one can imagine some particularly softhearted rock fan going up to the Butcher after a show and inviting the poor chap home for a nice, comforting bowl of chicken soup. Better make that a nice bowl of vegetable soup.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1987
It saddens me to see Richard Meltzer wishing for what's past and not opening himself up to the great, uncorrupted bands that are making music today ("Meltzer: Rock Is Dead," by Kristine McKenna, April 26). Bands like the Smiths, R.E.M., U2 and Simple Minds have large followings, yet have not changed their ideals and integrity to suit the mass market. These, including such lesser-known (but equally brilliant) acts as the Cocteau Twins, James, Woodentops, the Jazz Butcher and Husker Du, are the Dylans, Beatles and Rolling Stones of the '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
1. "Kiko," Los Lobos (Slash) 2. "Mi Vida Loca," Chris Gaffney (Hightone) 3. "Flown This Acid World," Peter Himmelman (Epic) 4. "Harvest Moon," Neil Young (Reprise) 5. "Magic & Loss," Lou Reed (Sire) 6. "Burning Questions," Graham Parker (Capitol) 7. "Condition Blue," The Jazz Butcher (Sky) 8. "Every Time You Say Goodbye," Alison Krauss & Union Station (Rounder) 9. "Fuzzy Little Piece of the World," Pontiac Brothers (Frontier) 10. "Arkansas Traveler," Michelle Shocked (Mercury)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Tickets go on sale Sunday for Sting's, right, Oct. 26-27 shows at the Universal Amphitheatre. . . . The same hall has also added two additional Mana shows, Sept. 24-25. Tickets are already on sale. . . . Tickets will be available Saturday for two Backstreet Boys concerts--Oct. 14 at the Arrowhead Pond and Oct. 19 at the Great Western Forum. . . . Also due at the Forum is Lenny Kravitz, who will be joined by Smash Mouth and Buckcherry on Oct. 8. Tickets go on sale Sunday. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
If names told the whole story, the Jazz Butcher could be a pretty tremendous group. Suggesting as it does the savaging of a rich and varied art form, the title well might lead one to expect some pretty impressive rubble to be left in this band's wake. Alas, in a world where governments can't even get accurate labeling from the food industry, it may be some time before we get around to truth-in-advertising legislation for rock acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1987
It saddens me to see Richard Meltzer wishing for what's past and not opening himself up to the great, uncorrupted bands that are making music today ("Meltzer: Rock Is Dead," by Kristine McKenna, April 26). Bands like the Smiths, R.E.M., U2 and Simple Minds have large followings, yet have not changed their ideals and integrity to suit the mass market. These, including such lesser-known (but equally brilliant) acts as the Cocteau Twins, James, Woodentops, the Jazz Butcher and Husker Du, are the Dylans, Beatles and Rolling Stones of the '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1986 | STEVE HOCHMAN
"Don't forget they only make pop records out of plastic," the chap who calls himself the Jazz Butcher sang Thursday at the Roxy. The message: no point in taking this too seriously. Yet the Butcher and his three-member group Sikkorskis From Hell demonstrated enough wit to make their music more than just the stuff of good times.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"BLOODY NONSENSE." The Jazz Butcher. Big Time. On the tongue-in-cheek evidence presented here, this arty London quartet has highly ambivalent feelings about being in the music business, and it reconciles that conflict by making pure pop for wiseacres--it's sort of a joke band, but not quite.
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