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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2000
I just read Don Heckman's excellent 1999 jazz year in review article ("Was the Glass Half Full or Half Empty? Both, Actually," Dec. 26) I have to respectfully disagree that it "took some effort to find a high school or college jazz program" 20 years ago. Jazz and music education programs were thriving in the '70s, particularly in Southern California. High school jazz ensembles from John Rinaldo in Eagle Rock, Roger Rickson in Corona, Galen Vogel in Huntington Beach, Reseda, Corona Del Mar and elsewhere played at jazz festivals and competitions throughout the state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2013 | By Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Paul Tanner, a trombonist with the Glenn Miller Orchestra who became a prominent jazz educator at UCLA and created an unusual electronic musical instrument heard on the Beach Boys' classic 1966 hit "Good Vibrations," has died. He was 95. Tanner died of pneumonia Tuesday at an assisted-living facility near his home in Carlsbad, Calif., said his wife, Jan. Tanner was a member of the Miller Orchestra, one of the best-known swing bands of the 1930s and '40s, for most of the orchestra's existence of less than a decade.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1989 | DIRK SUTRO
This month's National Assn. of Jazz Educators convention may give San Diego its biggest single shot of jazz in 1989. Big-time talent will take to the stage at Town & Country's Atlas Ballroom on three nights, but the nitty-gritty will be the more than 2,000 jazz educators, musicians and aficionados expected Jan. 12-15 for clinics, new product displays and the chance to mingle with influential jazz figures.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
Wedged in between appearances at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival backing Odd Future's Frank Ocean, the Canadian piano trio BadBadNotGood comes to the Mint on Tuesday with a small storm of controversy in its wake after a rather mouthy turn in a Toronto magazine recently . Scoffing at, among other things, jazz education, tradition and Robert Glasper (who in the group's view doesn't go far enough in mixing hip-hop and...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1995 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The big-band sound of a muscular brass section kicking butt echoed through the central lobby of the Anaheim Hilton on Thursday afternoon. Crisp, powerful blowing that instantly made one wonder: Basie? Herman? Kenton? But wait a minute. A closer look raised another question. Could those hot and heavy sounds really be blasting out of the horns of that baby-faced crew, those high school, or maybe college, kids on center stage? They could, and they were.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Electric guitarist Jesse van Ruller and acoustic bassist Darryl Hall won top honors in their respective categories this week at the ninth annual Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition held at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. Each received first-place prizes of $10,000 in cash and scholarships. Van Ruller of the Netherlands and Hall from New Jersey each won out over a group of nine musicians that had been narrowed to three finalists for Monday's final event.
MAGAZINE
February 7, 1999 | DANNY FEINGOLD, Danny Feingold is a frequent contributor to the Times
It's hard to imagine a young John Coltrane toting his horn to the Happiest Place on Earth for four days of woodshedding. But times have changed, as Shelly Berg can attest. "I'm 43, and I'm the last guy who learned to play the way I did," pianist Berg tells a crowd of teachers and aspiring musicians during a workshop at the Disneyland Hotel, site of last month's International Assn. of Jazz Educators conference. "They closed the door after me."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1992
It is interesting that the tone of Marsalis' remarks about post-bop jazz seems strangely reminiscent of the derogatory remarks made by traditionalists about be-bop when it first appeared on the scene several decades ago. For all his knowledge and musicianship, Marsalis seems to have forgotten that jazz is a dynamic art form that, at its best, involves creative risk and in which change is thus inherent, something that Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Eric...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
The latest and certainly one of the best in the transcriptions of McPartland's "Piano Jazz" radio series, this entertaining hour finds trumpeter Terry in estimable form as soloist, vocalist and raconteur. Reminiscing about his days with Duke Ellington, his invention of the hilarious "Mumbles" vocal styles and his work in jazz education, he fields questions from his ever-charming interviewer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
Wedged in between appearances at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival backing Odd Future's Frank Ocean, the Canadian piano trio BadBadNotGood comes to the Mint on Tuesday with a small storm of controversy in its wake after a rather mouthy turn in a Toronto magazine recently . Scoffing at, among other things, jazz education, tradition and Robert Glasper (who in the group's view doesn't go far enough in mixing hip-hop and...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | By Geoffrey Himes
Violinist Jenny Scheinman is eagerly anticipating this weekend's Winter Jazzfest in Manhattan -- not only because she'll be introducing her new duo with pianist Jason Moran but also because she'll have a chance to catch up with friends that she rarely gets to see. "Often I avoid the mayhem of festivals," said Scheinman, an up-and-coming talent who in the past has collaborated with musicians such as Bill Frisell and John Zorn, speaking by phone...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Bob Florence, a pianist, arranger, composer and bandleader who won a Grammy and two Emmy awards in a career reaching back to the late '50s, died Thursday at Barlow Respiratory Hospital in Los Angeles after a lengthy bout with pneumonia. He was 75. Although his schedule of activities was cut back a few months ago because of his illness, he had remained active, leading his Bob Florence Limited Edition big band in October and writing composing commissions from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, the International Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arnie Lawrence, 66, a saxophonist and influential jazz educator in New York and Israel, died of cancer April 22 in Jerusalem. A native of Brooklyn, Lawrence started playing the saxophone professionally at 12. In the early 1960s, he moved to Los Angeles, where he played with Chico Hamilton's big band. But he spent much of the 1960s in New York, where he was a member of Johnny Carson's "Tonight Show" band.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Every year around this time, 8,000 or so folks with a special interest in jazz get together for a unique celebration of the music. This year, the International Assn. for Jazz Education convened at the Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center from Wednesday through Saturday. The offerings covered every imaginable area, including academic papers and performances by world-class artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2002 | DON HECKMAN
Jazz drummer Art Blakey's bands were often referred to by musicians--affectionately--as "the University of Art" and "the School of Swing." Steaming caldrons of on-the-job training, they served as musical incubators for a range of talent stretching from Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard and Jackie McLean to Keith Jarrett, Branford Marsalis and Terence Blanchard. Blakey was primarily active from the mid-'50s to the late '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
OK, I know that New Year's resolutions are supposed to have been locked in on the first of the year. (I am also well aware that many of them already have been, shall we say, set aside.) But it occurred to me that there were a few resolutions which--if they weren't set aside--could generate some productive results for jazz and for the jazz community. So, even though no one has asked me, here are some of my off-the-cuff recommendations: * Diana Krall and Tommy LiPuma.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Every year around this time, 8,000 or so folks with a special interest in jazz get together for a unique celebration of the music. This year, the International Assn. for Jazz Education convened at the Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center from Wednesday through Saturday. The offerings covered every imaginable area, including academic papers and performances by world-class artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
OK, I know that New Year's resolutions are supposed to have been locked in on the first of the year. (I am also well aware that many of them already have been, shall we say, set aside.) But it occurred to me that there were a few resolutions which--if they weren't set aside--could generate some productive results for jazz and for the jazz community. So, even though no one has asked me, here are some of my off-the-cuff recommendations: * Diana Krall and Tommy LiPuma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2001
Edwin Finckel, 83, composer, jazz pianist and musical educator, died Monday in Madison, N.J. Born in Washington, D.C., Finckel gravitated toward jazz at an early age, learning piano by listening to solos by Teddy Wilson and Art Tatum. He also studied composing as a child and, by the 1940s, was working as a staff arranger for the bands of Boyd Raeburn, Les Brown and Gene Krupa.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2000
I just read Don Heckman's excellent 1999 jazz year in review article ("Was the Glass Half Full or Half Empty? Both, Actually," Dec. 26) I have to respectfully disagree that it "took some effort to find a high school or college jazz program" 20 years ago. Jazz and music education programs were thriving in the '70s, particularly in Southern California. High school jazz ensembles from John Rinaldo in Eagle Rock, Roger Rickson in Corona, Galen Vogel in Huntington Beach, Reseda, Corona Del Mar and elsewhere played at jazz festivals and competitions throughout the state.
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