Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJazz Guitarist
IN THE NEWS

Jazz Guitarist

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 7, 1990
Emily Remler, a highly acclaimed jazz guitarist, has died of a heart attack. Miss Remler, 32, died Thursday in Sydney, Australia. Graduated from the Berklee School of Music in Boston in 1976, Miss Remler won Times jazz critic Leonard Feather's "Golden Feather Award" in 1981 and in 1985 was named jazz guitarist of the year by Downbeat Annual International Critics Poll. She had recorded seven albums. Last year, Feather pronounced her performance at the Vine St.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Don Heckman
Jim Hall, a jazz guitarist, composer and arranger whose subtle, lyrical playing style was favored by such iconic jazz artists as Sonny Rollins, Bill Evans, Paul Desmond and Ella Fitzgerald, has died in New York. He was 83. Hall died in his sleep Tuesday at his apartment in Greenwich Village, according to his wife, Jane. Although he had been in poor health, Hall made music up to the end with the same creative enthusiasm that enlivened his seven-decade career. As recently as a month ago, he performed with his trio in a concert at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Allen Room, and he was planning a tour of Japan with Ron Carter in January.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2000
Joe Puma, 72, a jazz guitarist whose reflective style placed him in demand as both a soloist and an accompanist. Born in New York, Puma taught himself to play guitar as a teenager but spent the World War II years working as a draftsman and an airline mechanic. His first important jazz job came in 1949 when he performed in New York with the noted vibraphonist Joe Roland. Over the next decade, Puma played and recorded with Louis Bellson, Artie Shaw's Gramercy Five, Lee Konitz and Dick Hyman.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Chris Barton
SEPT. 13-15 Christian Scott After recent turns with the Cuban jazz trio 90 Miles and paying tribute to Miles Davis' "Tutu" with bassist Marcus Miller, trumpeter Scott had plenty of his own vision to get out of his system with his latest recording. "Christian aTunde Adjuah" takes its title from Scott's new full name and is a nod to his heritage with New Orleans' Mardi Gras Indians. Merging contemporary jazz with flourishes of hip-hop and indie rock, Scott is an artist with so much to say that he'll easily fill this three-night residency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2002
Remo Palmier, 78, a jazz guitarist who performed with Coleman Hawkins, Charlie Parker and Billie Holiday, died Saturday in New York City of complications from leukemia and lymphoma. Born in the Bronx, Palmier was self-trained and said that his primary influences were the guitarists Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian. But in later years he adopted the melodic and harmonic concepts of saxophonists Hawkins and Parker. In 1945, he began a 27-year period as guitarist for the "Arthur Godfrey Show."
NEWS
September 20, 1993
Steve Philip Jordan, 74, a jazz guitarist who played with Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw. Jordan played with Shaw in 1941-1942, the U.S. Navy band from 1942 to 1945, several other orchestras as the second half of the '40s began, and with Stan Kenton in 1948 and Boyd Raeburn in 1949. He went to work in the production department at NBC in the early 1950s and then played for Goodman from 1953 to 1956.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Collins, a jazz guitarist primarily known for his longtime association with Nat King Cole, has died. He was 83. Collins, who had been battling cancer, died Oct. 4 at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in West Los Angeles. A native of Montgomery, Ala., John Elbert Collins grew up in Chicago and briefly played clarinet before switching to guitar. Some of his earliest work was in a band led by his mother, pianist Georgia Gorham.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1989 | KELLY GILBERT, Baltimore Evening Sun
Larry Coryell, working jazz guitarist, relaxed for a moment at his hotel room here, then shifted into high gear. Phooey on historical conversation about himself and his accomplishments. He wanted to talk about his new quartet. "I just brought Cyrus Chestnut into the group yesterday," Coryell said.
NEWS
August 1, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laurindo Almeida, Brazilian-born classical and jazz guitarist whose performances and compositions earned five Grammy awards and an Academy Award, and whose work can be heard in more than 800 soundtracks, has died. He was 77. Almeida, who fused samba and jazz in the 1950s, making him the catalyst if not the creator of bossa nova, died Wednesday of cancer at Valley Presbyterian Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for Calendar.
As we all know, the current recession has more than legs. It's got teeth, and it has taken a darn big bite out of the entertainment budgets of both nightclubs and nightclub-goers. In the midst of all this, the splendid jazz guitarist Ron Eschete thrives. These days, Eschete's dance card is almost full. He's appearing on a regular basis with Gene Harris, the internationally popular pianist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Unless you're a regular subscriber to Modern Drummer magazine, the name Matt Chamberlain may not ring immediately familiar to you. If you're a jazz or rock fan, however, you would be amazed how many times you've heard Chamberlain's work in recent years. Approaching the rarefied, first-call status of fellow session luminaries such as Jim Keltner, Chamberlain's recent credits practically read like an as-yet unbooked Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony. Chamberlain recently appeared on Bruce Springsteen's album "Wrecking Ball," and previous credits include Tori Amos, Sarah McLachlan, Elvis Costello, Peter Gabriel, Sugarland and Kanye West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2010 | By Keith Thursby
Herb Ellis, a jazz guitarist perhaps best known for his work with the influential Oscar Peterson Trio, has died. He was 88. Ellis, who had Alzheimer's disease, died Sunday morning at his home in Los Angeles, said his son, Mitch. During his long and varied career, Ellis played with Jimmy Dorsey and Ella Fitzgerald. He also worked as a studio musician and played in the bands of several television shows, including Steve Allen's and Merv Griffin's. "There have been changes in jazz and new styles come along.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
One of the world's leading proponents of the music of Gypsy jazz innovator Django Reinhardt, who would have celebrated his 100th birthday Saturday, guitarist John Jorgenson offered illuminating anecdotes and back stories about Reinhardt's life and songs when he performed last weekend before an intimate crowd of about 100 people packed into what's normally a guitar showroom at Culver City's Boulevard Music store. But it wasn't the historical tales, nor the informed musical elucidation from Jorgenson that transfixed three children, all under 10, who looked on with delight from the front row during the performance by Jorgenson's hot-jazz quintet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Joe Beck, a jazz guitarist who collaborated with artists such as Frank Sinatra, Miles Davis and James Brown, died July 22 at a Connecticut hospice after battling lung cancer. He was 62. Beck was a prolific studio and session performer, arranger and producer with an identifiable harmonic and rhythmic sound. He was honored five times by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences as a "Most Valuable Player." Beck got his start as a teenager in the 1960s playing in a jazz trio in New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Ronald Muldrow, a guitarist who had been a fixture on the Los Angeles jazz scene for more than three decades, has died. He was 57. Muldrow was found dead Jan. 31 in his Los Angeles home, said his son, Stephen Muldrow. The cause of death is being determined. As an emerging jazz guitarist in the early 1970s, Muldrow connected with soul-jazz saxophonist Eddie Harris and was best known for his work with him, according to the website All About Jazz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2006 | From the Washington Post
Bill DeArango, an innovative jazz guitarist of the 1940s, died Dec. 26 at a nursing home in East Cleveland, Ohio. He had Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. He was 85. Few guitarists were part of the revolutionary bebop movement led by saxophonist Charlie Parker and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie until DeArango joined the New York jazz scene in 1944.
NEWS
June 6, 1992
Trefoni (Tony) Rizzi, jazz guitarist who performed with Stan Kenton and other well-known bands and popularized the work of pioneer guitarist Charlie Christian, has died. He was 69. Rizzi died Tuesday of a severe head injury suffered during a fall at his Huntington Beach home, his wife, Laurel, said Friday. She said he underwent emergency brain surgery at Hoag Memorial Medical Center in Newport Beach, but that he never regained consciousness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Ronald Muldrow, a guitarist who had been a fixture on the Los Angeles jazz scene for more than three decades, has died. He was 57. Muldrow was found dead Jan. 31 in his Los Angeles home, said his son, Stephen Muldrow. The cause of death is being determined. As an emerging jazz guitarist in the early 1970s, Muldrow connected with soul-jazz saxophonist Eddie Harris and was best known for his work with him, according to the website All About Jazz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Billy Bauer, a jazz guitarist who played with Woody Herman's First Herd band in the 1940s and later with bands led by Tommy Dorsey, Benny Goodman and Jack Teagarden, has died. He was 89. Bauer, who lived in Albertson, N.Y., died June 17 of complications from pneumonia, said his daughter, Pamela. The Bronx-born Bauer, who first played banjo and then switched to guitar, was most closely associated with pianist Lennie Tristano, playing in his ensembles beginning in the 1940s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Barney Kessel, the innovative and influential jazz guitarist known for his lyrical voice and harmonic improvisation, has died. He was 80. A pioneer of the electric guitar, Kessel died Thursday night in San Diego, where he had lived since 1989. The cause of death was a malignant brain tumor. He had been in poor health since 1992, when he had a stroke that curtailed his nearly six-decade musical career.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|