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TRAVEL
December 20, 1998 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uncommon Journeys is offering a cruise along the Pacific Coast from San Francisco to Vancouver to the Inside Passage of Alaska, starting April 28 for 16 days. Guests begin their holiday in San Francisco boarding the Norwegian Wind. They will spend the night docked at Fisherman's Wharf, which will allow passengers time in San Francisco. The ship will make a port visit to Astoria, Ore., before continuing on to Seattle and Prince Rupert in British Columbia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2014 | By Chris Barton
There are few surer bets in the concert industry than an anniversary celebration. Seen across the musical spectrum, including recent tours commemorating Miles Davis' "Kind of Blue" as well as this year's star-studded televised salute to the Beatles, such tributes reliably serve two constituencies in showing young listeners the value of history while allowing longtime fans to savor a bit of nostalgia. At a crowded Walt Disney Concert Hall on Saturday night, the Los Angeles Philharmonic offered a doubleheader of such tributes with "60+60," a concert featuring two ensembles that honored the 60th anniversaries of the Newport Jazz Festival and the landmark live recording "Jazz at Massey Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Ray Armando steps on stage Saturday at Chadney's in Burbank, he arrives steeped in jazz history. Armando was just 8 years old and living in Harlem when he started taking conga drum lessons from one of the acknowledged masters of the instrument, Cuban drummer Mongo Santamaria. "He lived across the street from me, and I used to see him all the time," said Armando, 56, a native New Yorker who now lives in Glendale. "When I asked him if he'd teach me, he asked me, 'Can you play a conga beat?'
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013
Maybe it's a byproduct of bandleader Gerald Wilson having spent much of his career as an educator, but seeing Wilson perform is a little like having an audience with jazz history itself. Now 94, Wilson has been a fixture on the L.A. scene since arriving with the Jimmie Lunceford Band in 1940, and his sense of melody and swing remained undiminished as evidenced by his Grammy-nominated 2011 album "Legacy. " Catalina Jazz Club, 6725 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles. 7:30 p.m. Sun. http://www.catalinajazzclub.com
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1995 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer.
James Carter, described by Rolling Stone as "the most exciting young saxophonist to arrive on the scene in the past 25 years," has never played a saxophone he didn't like. And he's got several rooms full of gleaming instruments to prove it. Carter's New York apartment is bursting at the seams with at least one example of nearly every variation of the versatile instrument devised by Belgian Adolphe Sax in the mid-19th Century--from the tiny sopranino to the elephantine bass.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013
Maybe it's a byproduct of bandleader Gerald Wilson having spent much of his career as an educator, but seeing Wilson perform is a little like having an audience with jazz history itself. Now 94, Wilson has been a fixture on the L.A. scene since arriving with the Jimmie Lunceford Band in 1940, and his sense of melody and swing remained undiminished as evidenced by his Grammy-nominated 2011 album "Legacy. " Catalina Jazz Club, 6725 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles. 7:30 p.m. Sun. http://www.catalinajazzclub.com
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
* * 1/2 "West Coast Jazz: Modern Jazz in California, 1945 to 1960," Ted Gioia, Oxford ($24.95). The style of this informative though somewhat dry and academically written volume is to set a scene, say Los Angeles' Central Avenue during the mid-'40s, and then explore that milieu by interweaving bios of key figures with factual data.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1999
In "L.A.'s Lost Street of Dreams" (Aug. 29), Kamau Daaood makes some very keen observations about Los Angeles' often overlooked role in the development of jazz. From the 1930s through the 1950s, when important local artists like Gerald Wilson, Big Jay McNeely and Gerald Wiggins were making real contributions to the golden age of jazz, the nation's, and the world's, attention was focused across town on the golden age of Hollywood. Partially, as a result, the great accomplishments on Central Avenue have all but been forgotten.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
The rare double bill at Catalina's, which continues through Sunday, works well, mainly because of the striking contrasts between the two groups, alto saxophonist Christopher Hollyday's quartet and guitarist Mark Whitfield's trio. Hollyday, who began his recording career seven years ago at age 14, has evidently made a thorough study of jazz history, going through a Charlie Parker phase before establishing a more direct link with Jackie McLean.
SPORTS
December 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
The best start in Jazz history got even better Sunday night as Karl Malone had 30 points and 13 rebounds and Utah defeated the SuperSonics for the second time this season, 96-90, at Seattle. Utah's bench outscored Seattle's, 44-22, as Antoine Carr had 13 points, Chris Morris 12 and rookie Shandon Anderson 11. Shawn Kemp had 29 points and 13 rebounds and Gary Payton had 18 points for the SuperSonics. Utah controlled play throughout, leading by as many as 14 points in the first half.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2012 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
Though a bustling, glossy downtown L.A. coffee shop is hardly a purely academic environment, there's something about sitting down with 93-year-old bandleader, composer and 2012 Grammy nominee Gerald Wilson that feels like crashing a history class. Maybe it's a byproduct of Wilson having spent much of his career as an educator, leading a popular jazz history class at three local universities since the 1970s, including UCLA, where Wilson remembers the fire department forcing him to clear the aisles for a class that had ballooned to more than 500 students.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2010 | By Andrew Gilbert, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In jazz, this is the era of the drummer. On a scene largely defined by the proliferation of creatively ambitious trap set experts, every year seems to bring a new crop of gifted rhythmic explorers. While steeped in jazz history, many of these musicians rove freely across stylistic frontiers, drawing from gospel, funk, folk, Balkan, Cuban and other deep musical wells. Over the next month, three drummer/bandleaders who've forged highly personal group sounds from myriad musical sources perform in the Los Angeles area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2010 | By Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Buddy Collette, a Grammy-nominated jazz saxophonist, flautist, bandleader and educator who played important roles in Los Angeles jazz as a musician and an advocate for the rights of African American musicians, has died. He was 89. Collette died Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles after suffering shortness of breath a day earlier, according to his daughter Cheryl Collette-White. Collette's virtuosic skills on saxophones, flute and clarinet allowed him to move easily from studio work in films, television and recording to small jazz groups and big bands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Hicks, 65, a jazz pianist whose versatility and range made him a preeminent sideman for a wide array of top performers, died Tuesday at St. Vincent's Hospital in New York City after a bout of internal bleeding. The son of a minister, Hicks was born in Atlanta and began playing piano at age 6. He played for the church choir as a teenager and later studied music at Lincoln University in Missouri and the Berklee College of Music in Boston.
NEWS
June 9, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Ask a group of fans to locate the heart of the American jazz scene and the most likely response will be: "New York, man. Where else?" A few might mention the roots rhythms of New Orleans, the urban jazz-blues of Chicago or the down-home swing of Kansas City, but very few will place Los Angeles at the top of the list. "Where's the history?" some might ask.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2003 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
"Like Jazz," the suave, supper-club outing of a show that opened Wednesday at the Mark Taper Forum, deliberately raises the question: What is jazz like? There's no easy way of answering that, of course, though any number of top-drawer writers and critics, from Langston Hughes and Julio Cortazar to Frank O'Hara and Toni Morrison, have tried to put jazz's ineffable essence into words. By its fluid nature, jazz resists being pinned down, whether by lyric, melody, tempo or emotion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1995 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The colorful array of instruments spread across the stage of the Jazz Bakery Friday night--a shenai, didjeridoo, dumbek, kalimba and oud, in addition to more familiar saxophones and brass--immediately underscored Yusef Lateef's status as one of the first jazz globalists. As far back as the 1950s he was actively pursuing the connections between jazz and the music of the Middle East, Asia and Africa, and his fascination with such syntheses continues into his 74th year.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The Jazz Heritage Foundation numbers among its good works the introduction of jazz to youngsters in schools and the presentation of tributes to musicians who have paid exceptional dues. Kenneth (Red) Norvo, in whose honor the foundation mounted a ceremony Sunday afternoon at At My Place in Santa Monica, has enjoyed a career without parallel in jazz history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John S. Wilson, 89, the first New York Times critic to write exclusively about popular music and jazz, died Tuesday in Princeton, N.J. The cause of death was not reported. Wilson, who remained a freelance writer throughout his career, began contributing to the Times in 1952. He covered everything from cabaret to the folk revival, but was best known for his writing on jazz. Saxophonist Sonny Rollins named "John S.," a song on his album "The Bridge," in his honor. Born in Elizabeth, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 2 1/2-hour snapshot version of the history of jazz was on display at El Camino College's Marsee Auditorium Saturday night when the Newport Jazz Millennium Celebration played the final event in a two-month national tour. "Snapshot" because little effort was made to offer a linear stroll through the jazz century.
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