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June 3, 1988
Ricky May, 44, a leading Australian jazz singer. The New Zealand-born performer was stricken with what appeared to be a heart attack Wednesday minutes after being given a standing ovation at the opening night of his new show at the Regent Hotel in Sydney. He was pronounced dead on arrival at a hospital.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2013 | By August Brown
Junior Murvin had one of the greatest reggae singles ever. " Police & Thieves " is a genre staple and one of reggae's most perpetually covered tracks. The singer died Monday in Jamaica, and his song will be the centerpiece of his legacy. Murvin's age has been listed as 64 and 67 in varying reports . The singer had recently been hospitalized for diabetes and blood pressure-related illnesses, but a cause of death was not immediately known. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 Murvin was discovered by legendary producer Lee "Scratch" Perry after performing in lounges in Portland parish, east of the capital of Kingston.
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NEWS
April 8, 1987
Maxine Sullivan, the diminutive jazz singer who began as a child prodigy, became a popular favorite after recording "Loch Lomond" in the 1930s and then a beloved figure to jazz cognoscente for the past four decades, is dead at 75. The 4-foot-11-inch Cotton Club veteran, who was nominated for three Grammy awards, died late Tuesday in a New York City hospital, it was learned today. She had been performing almost until the time of her death and had appeared in Los Angeles earlier this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By David Colker
Jazz singer Gloria Lynne, whose roller-coaster career took her from hits like "I Wish You Love" in the 1960s to near-obscurity and then rediscovery, died on Oct. 8 in a Newark, N.J., hospital. She was 83. The cause of death was a heart attack, said her son Richard Alleyne, a rock arranger known professionally as P.J. Allen. Lynne was lauded for her interpretations of songs in a wide variety of styles, and "I Wish You Love," her best-known recording, scored high on the charts in 1964.
NEWS
December 12, 1992
Diane Varga, a singer, dancer and impresario described by Times critic Leonard Feather as "one of the best friends Southland jazz ever had," is dead. Buddy Childers, a trumpeter and big band leader, said his fiancee was 53 when she died Wednesday of undetermined causes at a North Hollywood hospital. An autopsy is pending, he said. Miss Varga was born Diane Hingley. Her grandfather was recording executive Andrae Nordskog. In 1922, he was the first to record a New Orleans black jazz band.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By David Colker
Jazz singer Gloria Lynne, whose roller-coaster career took her from hits like "I Wish You Love" in the 1960s to near-obscurity and then rediscovery, died on Oct. 8 in a Newark, N.J., hospital. She was 83. The cause of death was a heart attack, said her son Richard Alleyne, a rock arranger known professionally as P.J. Allen. Lynne was lauded for her interpretations of songs in a wide variety of styles, and "I Wish You Love," her best-known recording, scored high on the charts in 1964.
NEWS
November 19, 1996
Deedie Ball, 79, a jazz singer, pianist and composer. In the 1940s and '50s, Ball was a member of the Ina Rae Hutton All-Girl Show, which performed on television. She was a featured soloist on the Kay Starr radio show and performed frequently in clubs in Los Angeles and Las Vegas. Still performing, Ball was playing the piano for a stage play at the Interact Theater of Cuesta College in San Luis Obispo when she suffered a heart attack. On Friday in San Luis Obispo.
NEWS
November 14, 1989
Kenny (Pancho) Hagood, 62, a Detroit-born ballad and jazz singer probably best known for his rendition of "Darn That Dream," the lone vocal on the 1950 Miles Davis album "Birth of the Cool." Hagood toured Europe and the United States for a few years in the late 1940s with Dizzy Gillespie's band and also recorded Gillespie's theme song, "I Waited for You." Times jazz critic Leonard Feather remembered him as "one of the better singers in the Billy Eckstine tradition."
NEWS
September 17, 1998
Johnny Adams, 67, a blues and ballad singer who crossed over from vaudeville-like comedy to gospel music and jazz. A member of the gospel group Soul Revivers in the 1950s in his native New Orleans, he was known for versions of "Precious Lord" and "I Won't Cry" (released originally as "Oh Why"). He worked in relative obscurity until 1983, when he recorded a nine-album series for Rounder Records that featured contemporary blues coupled with jazz standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2001 | DON HECKMAN
Natalie Cole showed up in every one of her numerous musical personas Saturday at the Hollywood Bowl. And she was stunning in each, performing with supreme confidence in front of the Los Angeles Philharmonic (conducted by Gail Deadrick). Shifting gears without a misstep from jazz to R&B to gospel, she was a consummate musical entertainer, bringing imagination and life to every word she sang. That said, some portions of her show seemed more distinctive than others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | Devin Kelly, Los Angeles Times
Don Nelson, a screenwriter, film producer and musician who co-wrote scripts for "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" - the classic American television series centered on his brother Ozzie's family - as well as for more than two dozen other films and TV series, has died. He was 86. Nelson, who had Parkinson's disease, died of an aortic aneurysm Tuesday at his home in Studio City, said his wife, Marilyn. As a staff writer for "Ozzie and Harriet," one of the longest-running family comedies in TV history, Nelson came up with Ricky Nelson's trademark catchphrase "I don't mess around, boy," and contributed to more than 200 episodes of the series with storylines anchored famously on the harmless.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2013 | By Ernest Hardy
At age 69, Diana Ross is no longer the sylph fashionista who forged the template for modern pop diva-dom. Mother of five and grandmother of two, she's still glamorous and beautiful (appearing a good two decades younger than she is) and her voice,  though no longer able to hit those glorious high notes, remains remarkably supple. It's precisely because her voice is still so wonderfully emotive that her sold-out Hollywood Bowl concert Saturday night was both thrilling and frustrating.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
Is José James a jazz singer or a soul singer? Old school or new school? A guardian of tradition or a seeker of thrills? Yes, yes and yes. This 35-year-old vocalist, born in Minneapolis and now based in New York, has spent the last decade working to prove those dichotomies false. He's released a string of impressive, slyly audacious albums that mingle cool supper-club singing and fractured hip-hop beats and has performed with artists ranging from the veteran jazz pianist McCoy Tyner to the hipster electronic whiz Flying Lotus.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
"Singin' in the Rain" got it wrong. The beloved 1952 musical-comedy spoofing the transition from silent films to sound in Hollywood didn't reflect what really happened after the release of 1927's "The Jazz Singer," the blockbuster starring Al Jolson that featured synchronized songs and limited dialogue. According to UCLA Film & Television Archive programmer Paul Malcolm, the studios didn't go into a panic, as portrayed in the Gene Kelly-Debbie Reynolds classic, when "all of a sudden production stopped and nobody knew what to do. " What actually happened, said Malcolm, was "a very rational, ordered decision to move forward with sound production, and they did it in a very rational and orderly way. " PHOTOS: Behind-the-scenes Classic Hollywood The studios decided to make multiple versions of motion pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2012 | By David Ng
Before he died in August at the age of 68, Marvin Hamlisch recorded a brief cameo for "The Simpsons," playing a version of himself in an episode involving Abe Simpson's hidden past. On Sunday, the episode finally aired on Fox, making Hamlisch's vocal role a posthumous performance for the late conductor and composer. Sunday's episode, "Gone Abie Gone," focused on Abe's past love affair with a sultry jazz singer. They meet at a restaurant called Spiro's where Abe, Homer Simpson's dad, is working as a busboy while aspiring to become a songwriter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
On such a winter's day in New York, Jane Monheit was California dreaming. Specifically, her thoughts were turned toward the Catalina Jazz Club , where the 33-year-old chanteuse had been scheduled to play her regular New Year's Eve gig, starting Tuesday night and culminating Sunday. Instead, Monheit, her husband and their 21/2 -year-old son have been virtually housebound since Christmas Eve at her parents' Long Island home ? stranded, like seemingly half the Eastern seaboard, by the Pleistocene -worthy winter storms that have blanketed the region.
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To her millions of fans, Ella Fitzgerald was the quintessential jazz singer, capable of generating rhythmic spunk and spirit in everything she touched. Her death Saturday closes the book on the most prolific era in jazz singing, an era in which she and three other great performers--Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan and Carmen McRae--dominated the jazz vocal world. Frank Sinatra once said that Fitzgerald was "a singer's singer," and few vocalists would disagree.
NEWS
November 11, 1989
George E. (Judd) McMichael Jr., 83, a jazz singer with the Merry Macs quartet, which recorded such popular hits as "Mairzy Doats," the "Hut Hut Song" and "Spurs That Jingle Jangle Jingle." Often working with the so-called Big Bands in the 1930s and 1940s, the group sang regularly on radio's Don McNeil "Breakfast Club" and the Fred Allen Show, and in movies including "Ride 'em Cowboy" with Abbott and Costello and "Mr. Music" with Bing Crosby. They also played London's Palladium with Danny Kaye.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2010 | Keith Thursby
Abbey Lincoln, an acclaimed jazz singer, songwriter and actress who evolved from a supper-club singer into a strong voice for civil rights, has died. She was 80. Lincoln died Saturday in a nursing home in New York, said Evelyn Mason, her niece. No cause was given, but she had been in failing health. Lincoln built a career as an actress and singer in the late 1950s through the turbulent 1960s, then stepped away during the 1970s and, years later, returned to prominence as a singer praised for her songwriting abilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2010 | By Chris Michaud, Reuters
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Jazz singer Abbey Lincoln, whose career spanned six decades and included acting, composing and participation in the U.S. civil rights movement, died on Saturday at age 80, The New York Times reported. Lincoln, who was often said to have been strongly influenced by famed jazz singer Billie Holiday, died at her Manhattan apartment, the Times said, citing her brother David Wooldridge. Starting in the mid-1950s with "Abbey Lincoln's Affair...a Story of a Girl in Love," the Chicago-born Lincoln enjoyed a long and acclaimed singing career.
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