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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA
Former President Jimmy Carter told workers at a Northridge stereo components factory Tuesday that they prove that American workers can compete successfully with the Japanese. "We watch and we hear every day that Americans cannot compete with the Japanese," Carter told workers at Harman/JBL Inc., according to a company statement. "You prove every day that this allegation is absolutely false."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA
Former President Jimmy Carter told workers at a Northridge stereo components factory Tuesday that they prove that American workers can compete successfully with the Japanese. "We watch and we hear every day that Americans cannot compete with the Japanese," Carter told workers at Harman/JBL Inc., according to a company statement. "You prove every day that this allegation is absolutely false."
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BUSINESS
May 5, 1987
James S. Twerdahl was named president of Marantz, a Chatsworth-based stereo concern acquired last year by Dynascan Corp. He replaced Fred N. Hackendahl, Dynascan's vice president for corporate development, who was interim president. Hackendahl will return to Dynascan's Chicago headquarters. Marantz was previously run by Joseph and Fred Tushinsky, whose family owned a controlling interest before selling to Dynascan just before year's end.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1992
Former President Jimmy Carter told workers at a Northridge stereo components factory Tuesday that they prove that American workers can compete successfully with the Japanese. "We watch and we hear every day that Americans cannot compete with the Japanese," Carter told workers at Harman/JBL Inc., according to a company statement. "You prove every day that this allegation is absolutely false."
BUSINESS
September 7, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Northridge-based Harman International Industries Inc., maker of high-end stereo systems under such brand names as Infinity and JBL, said a judge ordered that it pay $5.7 million in damages to closely held rival Bose Corp. in a patent infringement lawsuit over speaker technology. A federal judge in Boston ruled last week that Harman's JBL Inc. and Infinity Systems Corp. units infringed Bose's patent covering plastic ports incorporated in some stereo speakers, Harman officials said in a release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1989
The information for this listing was unavailable for several months. The South Coast Air Quality Management District has responsibility to control air pollution in the area. It has the power to seek court-imposed fines against polluters of from $25 to $25,000 a day based on such factors as the extent that emissions exceed legal limits, the potential danger to the public, whether the violation was intentional, accidental or due to negligence and the company's history of violations.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the halls of Harman International Industries Inc. in Northridge, executives speak with awe of "Project K2." It's not a classified weapons system but a set of audio loudspeakers named after the Himalayan peak, K2, which is considered the most difficult mountain on earth to climb. The 4-foot-tall speaker, available in whitewashed maple and black lacquer, is the crowning jewel of JBL Inc., Harman's main subsidiary and one of the oldest and best-known names in the speaker business.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1997 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Morris carries fond memories of his days as a young guitarist in a New Jersey garage band that played in the shadow of a rival group led by a guy named Bruce Springsteen. The Boss graduated to bigger venues, and Morris, now 47 and living in Brea, long ago traded his guitar for a steady day job. But the allure of the music business is strong, and Morris has returned to his garage to build amplifiers for sale to upscale guitarists.
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