Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJean A Kawahara
IN THE NEWS

Jean A Kawahara

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1994 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The gaudy brass lettering that spells out the name of her predecessor still looms large on the wall outside the U.S. attorney's office here, but Jean A. Kawahara is firmly entrenched in the office he vacated. * The shelves beside her desk are packed with 26 volumes of "U.S. v. Andonian," the case that consumed three years of Kawahara's life and became one of the nation's biggest money-laundering prosecutions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1994 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The gaudy brass lettering that spells out the name of her predecessor still looms large on the wall outside the U.S. attorney's office here, but Jean A. Kawahara is firmly entrenched in the office he vacated. * The shelves beside her desk are packed with 26 volumes of "U.S. v. Andonian," the case that consumed three years of Kawahara's life and became one of the nation's biggest money-laundering prosecutions.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 12, 1996
The owner of an Anaheim business was indicted Tuesday on tax evasion charges. John H. Kocyla, 48, owner of Custom John's General Store, was accused of filing returns for two years that falsely showed he had no taxable income. The federal grand jury indictment in Los Angeles charges Kocyla had "material" taxable income in 1989 and 1990 that he failed to report. "The amount is substantial, but we want to reserve that figure until trial," Assistant U.S. Atty. Jean A. Kawahara said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1988
A Panorama City woman has been convicted in Los Angeles federal court of using her daughter and a nephew to sell rock cocaine near an elementary school. Terris Ann Paige, 34, was convicted Tuesday of four counts of selling cocaine within 1,000 feet of a school in April and May and of two counts of using a minor to distribute the drug. Paige faces a mandatory minimum sentence of five years in prison.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Westminster doctor and his wife have pleaded guilty to felony charges of failing to report nearly $296,000 on their individual and corporate income tax returns. Dr. David Dung Le, 54, and Kim Huong Le, 46, who lived in Laguna Niguel, were allowed to return to their home in Texas after entering pleas late Monday to two counts each of filing false returns for 1990. Each faces a maximum sentence of six years in prison. They are scheduled to be sentenced Dec. 22 before U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1988 | GABE FUENTES, Times Staff Writer
A Panorama City woman convicted of using her daughter and a nephew to sell rock cocaine near an elementary school was sentenced in federal court Monday to 5 years in prison without the possibility of parole. U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp could have sentenced Terris Ann Paige, 34, to consecutive terms totaling 280 years. Instead, the judge sentenced her to concurrent 5-year terms on each of six charges. Paige was convicted Aug.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal authorities said Wednesday that two Anaheim businessmen have been indicted on charges of avoiding currency reporting guidelines in their purchase of a 960-acre ranch straddling the California-Oregon border. A federal grand jury in Los Angeles on Tuesday charged John H. Kocyla, 44, and Philip M. Grammatica, 47, with a total of nine counts of conspiracy and structuring cash transactions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999 | From A Times Staff Writer
A former member of Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca's special celebrity reserve unit and an alleged accomplice were indicted by a federal grand jury Wednesday on suspicion of laundering about $225,000, the U.S. attorney announced. Elie Abdalnour, 36, of San Dimas, a wealthy Baca supporter, had been sworn in last June and given a badge and a gun by the department. He is the second member of the celebrity reserve unit to be arrested this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Encino man was sentenced to seven years in prison and ordered to pay $6.7 million in restitution to victims of a fraudulent tax shelter scheme involving historic buildings, the U.S. attorney's office said Tuesday. Mark Roy Anderson, 36, was sentenced Monday by U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian after pleading guilty to two counts of mail fraud in a scheme in which he raised about $47 million from 1,500 investors between 1983 and 1986, said Jean A. Kawahara, the assistant U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newport Beach investment adviser Steven D. Wymer was indicted Thursday on 30 counts of securities fraud, mail fraud, money laundering, obstruction of justice and other federal charges stemming from the alleged loss of more than $100 million of his clients' money. Wymer's attorney, Paul N. Murphy, said he assumed that the 43-year-old money manager will plead not guilty to all charges at his arraignment Monday.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for Steven D. Wymer, the Newport Beach money manager accused of federal securities fraud, said in court Thursday that he lost millions of dollars of clients' money in bad investments and was "trying to make them whole" when forced to close down his business. The statements came during a hearing before U.S. District Judge Venetta S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|