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Jean Auel

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NEWS
October 28, 1990 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jean Auel arrives in her Los Angeles hotel room, two packages are waiting under her door. One contains a bookstore chain's best-seller list penciled with an exclamatory, "What about this!" The other is from a Beverly Hills pharmacy, sending over a bottle of antibiotics. Auel, the blockbuster author of the "Earth Children" series--"The Clan of the Cave Bear," "The Valley of Horses" and "The Mammoth Hunters"--is about to embark on a monthlong U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Land of Painted Caves A Novel Jean M. Auel Crown: 768 pp., $30 It's been 31 years since readers were introduced to Ayla, a 5-year-old orphaned Cro-Magnon girl adopted by Neanderthals in "The Clan of the Cave Bear," the first book in Jean Auel's Earth's Children series. "The Land of Painted Caves," her sixth and final installment, picks up where "The Shelters of Stone" left off. Ayla is now mated to Jondalar and mother to a baby girl, Jonayla. She's come a long way from the outcast of the first book.
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NEWS
December 4, 1986 | Ann Conway
When "Clan and the Cave Bear" author Jean Auel was honored at the Natural History Museum of Orange County's "Mammoth" Feast on Tuesday night, she was met with more than a groaning board of glacial lake seafood salad, field-gathered dandelions, spit-roasted fowl, "mammoth" roast, wild rice, squash and stone pudding with hard sauce. A replica of a prehistoric cave had been erected in her honor.
NEWS
May 27, 2002 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a black stretch limousine parked in front of John Burroughs Middle School last week, and even for a gifted magnet school in Hancock Park, that's a sign that something unusual might be taking place. And it was. Inside, author Jean Auel was speaking to a group of sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders, all of whom had studied her first novel, "The Clan of the Cave Bear" as part of an ancient history/literature class taught by Phoebe Faulkner.
BOOKS
October 14, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
Browsers in 4,000 American bookstores these last few weeks may have mistaken the satin, six-foot-long banners that say "IT'S COMING!" for the announcement of a major religious phenomenon. On the other hand, Jean M. Auel's millions of fans might very well view the publication of "The Plains of Passage," the latest in Auel's "Earth's Children" series, as a spiritual event of its own. "It's a devout following," said Andrew K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1993 | JAMES MAIELLA JR., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Moorpark school board member is fighting to have the works of popular novelist Jean Auel, author of "The Clan of the Cave Bear," taken off the Moorpark High School recommended reading list because of explicit sexual content.
BOOKS
November 24, 1985 | Judy Bass, Bass is a book critic and feature writer in Massachusetts. and
"All good books . . . are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one . . . it all belongs to you: the good and the bad, the ecstasy . . . the people and the places and how the weather was," wrote Ernest Hemingway in 1934. "The Mammoth Hunters," Jean M. Auel's sequel to "The Clan of the Cave Bear" (1980) and "The Valley of Horses" (1982), often manifests the kind of veracity and inclusiveness that Hemingway relished.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Land of Painted Caves A Novel Jean M. Auel Crown: 768 pp., $30 It's been 31 years since readers were introduced to Ayla, a 5-year-old orphaned Cro-Magnon girl adopted by Neanderthals in "The Clan of the Cave Bear," the first book in Jean Auel's Earth's Children series. "The Land of Painted Caves," her sixth and final installment, picks up where "The Shelters of Stone" left off. Ayla is now mated to Jondalar and mother to a baby girl, Jonayla. She's come a long way from the outcast of the first book.
NEWS
May 27, 2002 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a black stretch limousine parked in front of John Burroughs Middle School last week, and even for a gifted magnet school in Hancock Park, that's a sign that something unusual might be taking place. And it was. Inside, author Jean Auel was speaking to a group of sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders, all of whom had studied her first novel, "The Clan of the Cave Bear" as part of an ancient history/literature class taught by Phoebe Faulkner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2002 | GILLIAN FLACCUS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twenty-five years ago, Jean M. Auel sat down to write the first threads of an epic prehistoric tale and realized she didn't know anything about her subject. She wanted one of her main characters, a young girl, to help a crippled Neanderthal man get a drink of water. The problem was, Auel didn't know if Neanderthals had cups--and if they did, how they used them. "How do you get a drink of water?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2002 | GILLIAN FLACCUS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twenty-five years ago, Jean M. Auel sat down to write the first threads of an epic prehistoric tale and realized she didn't know anything about her subject. She wanted one of her main characters, a young girl, to help a crippled Neanderthal man get a drink of water. The problem was, Auel didn't know if Neanderthals had cups--and if they did, how they used them. "How do you get a drink of water?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1993 | JAMES MAIELLA JR., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Moorpark school board member is fighting to have the works of popular novelist Jean Auel, author of "The Clan of the Cave Bear," taken off the Moorpark High School recommended reading list because of explicit sexual content.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jean Auel arrives in her Los Angeles hotel room, two packages are waiting under her door. One contains a bookstore chain's best-seller list penciled with an exclamatory, "What about this!" The other is from a Beverly Hills pharmacy, sending over a bottle of antibiotics. Auel, the blockbuster author of the "Earth Children" series--"The Clan of the Cave Bear," "The Valley of Horses" and "The Mammoth Hunters"--is about to embark on a monthlong U.S.
BOOKS
October 14, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
Browsers in 4,000 American bookstores these last few weeks may have mistaken the satin, six-foot-long banners that say "IT'S COMING!" for the announcement of a major religious phenomenon. On the other hand, Jean M. Auel's millions of fans might very well view the publication of "The Plains of Passage," the latest in Auel's "Earth's Children" series, as a spiritual event of its own. "It's a devout following," said Andrew K.
BOOKS
October 14, 1990 | Judy Bass, Bass is book columnist for The Boston Herald
"Judge the goodness of a book by the energy of the punches it has given you," wrote Gustave Flaubert, author of "Madame Bovary." According to him, "the greatest characteristic of genius is, above all, force." Two new novels about prehistoric hunter-gatherers--"The Plains of Passage" by Jean M. Auel and Elizabeth Marshall Thomas' "The Animal Wife"--both exemplify the kind of narrative power that Flaubert equated with virtuosity.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | Ann Conway
When "Clan and the Cave Bear" author Jean Auel was honored at the Natural History Museum of Orange County's "Mammoth" Feast on Tuesday night, she was met with more than a groaning board of glacial lake seafood salad, field-gathered dandelions, spit-roasted fowl, "mammoth" roast, wild rice, squash and stone pudding with hard sauce. A replica of a prehistoric cave had been erected in her honor.
BOOKS
October 14, 1990 | Judy Bass, Bass is book columnist for The Boston Herald
"Judge the goodness of a book by the energy of the punches it has given you," wrote Gustave Flaubert, author of "Madame Bovary." According to him, "the greatest characteristic of genius is, above all, force." Two new novels about prehistoric hunter-gatherers--"The Plains of Passage" by Jean M. Auel and Elizabeth Marshall Thomas' "The Animal Wife"--both exemplify the kind of narrative power that Flaubert equated with virtuosity.
BOOKS
December 8, 1985
Twice in her review of Jean Auel's "The Mammoth Hunters" Judy Bass (Book Review, Nov. 24) refers to the principal characters as Neanderthals! How she came to such an egregious misreading is beyond understanding, for one of Auel's major points throughout her series is that Jondalar and the Mamutoi are people just like us: Homo sapiens. And like us, they are afflicted with racial prejudice, theirs directed against the Neanderthals ("those filthy flatheads"). With such a perversely confused view, it is no wonder that Bass was disturbed by what she perceived as "glaring incongruities" in the story.
BOOKS
November 24, 1985 | Judy Bass, Bass is a book critic and feature writer in Massachusetts. and
"All good books . . . are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one . . . it all belongs to you: the good and the bad, the ecstasy . . . the people and the places and how the weather was," wrote Ernest Hemingway in 1934. "The Mammoth Hunters," Jean M. Auel's sequel to "The Clan of the Cave Bear" (1980) and "The Valley of Horses" (1982), often manifests the kind of veracity and inclusiveness that Hemingway relished.
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