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Jean Baudrillard

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2007 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
The death Tuesday in Paris of French theoretician Jean Baudrillard prompted some unusual Internet postings, including "Baudrillard's Death Did Not Happen," "Jean Baudrillard did not take place," "Baudrillard did not exist" and "Jean Baudrillard is survived by his simulacrum." These were, oddly enough, tributes, offered in the spirit of a guru of postmodern thought who exerted enormous influence on contemporary artists and writers, including the creators of "The Matrix" movies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2007 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
The death Tuesday in Paris of French theoretician Jean Baudrillard prompted some unusual Internet postings, including "Baudrillard's Death Did Not Happen," "Jean Baudrillard did not take place," "Baudrillard did not exist" and "Jean Baudrillard is survived by his simulacrum." These were, oddly enough, tributes, offered in the spirit of a guru of postmodern thought who exerted enormous influence on contemporary artists and writers, including the creators of "The Matrix" movies.
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BOOKS
January 15, 1989 | ALEX RAKSIN
As America has become increasingly self-absorbed during the Reagan years, European artists and intellectuals have become increasingly absorbed in America. Film makers such as Percy Adlon and Bertrand Tavernier have visited such peculiarly American places as Salt Lake City and Las Vegas, for instance, in the hope of finding some clue about the culture they believe is eclipsing their own.
BOOKS
December 17, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
LOVE AND LOSS American Portrait and Mourning Miniatures By Robin Jaffee Frank; Yale University Press: 358 pp., $35 These eerie miniatures are talismans. Popular from the mid-18th century to the mid-19th, they were held close to the body, worn as jewelry or fingered in pockets, "cherished in private." They were painted in watercolor on thin disks of ivory, sometimes by well-known portraitists like John Singleton Copley or Charles Willson Peale.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989 | Kristine McKenna
The fashionable French thinker of the decade and reigning high priest of media theory, Jean Baudrillard has taken a sizable segment of the art world by storm, and the list of artists who cite him as a central influence is long indeed (Haim Steinbach, Bruce and Norman Yonomoto, Meyer Vaisman, Jeff Koons, Peter Nagy, Robert Longo, to name a few). Espousing a line of thought that begins with Baudelaire, reaches critical mass with Warhol and borrows heavily from Marshall McLuhan and Buckminster Fuller, Baudrillard isn't a particularly original thinker.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1996 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Chris Kraus has written and directed an independent feature film, a comedy about flying saucers called "Gravity & Grace," that will open at Laemmle's Grande on Dec. 6. But this story has nothing to do with that. At least it doesn't seem to. It has to do, instead, with French philosopher Jean Baudrillard, the darling of university critical studies departments. It has to do with what's billed as the world's tallest and scariest roller coaster. It has to do with butoh, avant-garde Japanese dance.
BOOKS
December 17, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
LOVE AND LOSS American Portrait and Mourning Miniatures By Robin Jaffee Frank; Yale University Press: 358 pp., $35 These eerie miniatures are talismans. Popular from the mid-18th century to the mid-19th, they were held close to the body, worn as jewelry or fingered in pockets, "cherished in private." They were painted in watercolor on thin disks of ivory, sometimes by well-known portraitists like John Singleton Copley or Charles Willson Peale.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2012 | By Neal Gabler, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Long before there were "real" housewives on television, actor-politicians and even potential celebrity politicians like Donald Trump, theme restaurants, virtual online vacations and Kim Kardashian, who makes her living by being Kim Kardashian, there was "The Image," historian Daniel Boorstin's prescient examination of a nation in transition, which celebrates the 50th anniversary of its publication this year. When "The Image" first appeared, one critic predicted that it would join William Whyte's "The Organization Man" and John Kenneth Galbraith's "The Affluent Society" as one of those seminal books that not only capture the zeitgeist but change the American mind-set.
BOOKS
February 3, 1991 | Alex Raksin
THE CONSCIENCE OF THE EYE: The Design and Social Life of Cities by Richard Sennett (Alfred A. Knopf: $24.95; 252 pp.) . Should you find yourself discouraged that modern American cities have become little more than networks of streets leading to the office or shopping mall, consider joining sociology professor Richard Sennett for this tour through a time when cities were landscapes for self-discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | Cathy Curtis
New York artist Nancy Dwyer carries the torch for the holy cult of Jean Baudrillard in paintings and three-dimensional pieces that are entirely composed of words. The idea has its amusing side--fancy the mogul of your choice enjoying a $25,000 green leather-topped mahogany desk carved into the shape of the word, "ENVY." And there are some smart-aleck points to be scored.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1996 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Chris Kraus has written and directed an independent feature film, a comedy about flying saucers called "Gravity & Grace," that will open at Laemmle's Grande on Dec. 6. But this story has nothing to do with that. At least it doesn't seem to. It has to do, instead, with French philosopher Jean Baudrillard, the darling of university critical studies departments. It has to do with what's billed as the world's tallest and scariest roller coaster. It has to do with butoh, avant-garde Japanese dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989 | Kristine McKenna
The fashionable French thinker of the decade and reigning high priest of media theory, Jean Baudrillard has taken a sizable segment of the art world by storm, and the list of artists who cite him as a central influence is long indeed (Haim Steinbach, Bruce and Norman Yonomoto, Meyer Vaisman, Jeff Koons, Peter Nagy, Robert Longo, to name a few). Espousing a line of thought that begins with Baudelaire, reaches critical mass with Warhol and borrows heavily from Marshall McLuhan and Buckminster Fuller, Baudrillard isn't a particularly original thinker.
BOOKS
January 15, 1989 | ALEX RAKSIN
As America has become increasingly self-absorbed during the Reagan years, European artists and intellectuals have become increasingly absorbed in America. Film makers such as Percy Adlon and Bertrand Tavernier have visited such peculiarly American places as Salt Lake City and Las Vegas, for instance, in the hope of finding some clue about the culture they believe is eclipsing their own.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
Bobby Ross' meticulously detailed paintings are so overloaded with visual information that they induce a state of mental vertigo, producing what philosopher Jean Baudrillard calls the "obscene delirium of communication." Ross mitigates this sense of media overload by placing his "high-tech" morality plays within literal and metaphorical theatrical frameworks, extracting a loose narrative reading from even the densest tangle of information.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
It's ironic that French philosopher Jean Baudrillard has become a theoretical guru for many Post-Modernists. His post-Orwellian warnings about loss of meaning in an image-saturated society, where language exists solely for the mere "ecstasy of communication," have proved very seductive to the younger generation of painters who have emerged since conceptualism. What better way to justify painting's renewed life after death than to attach it to a philosophy that appears to validate redundancy?
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