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Jean Baudrillard

MAGAZINE
February 3, 2002
Something about mimes really ticks people off. Maybe it's that precious handing-out-flowers-in-the-Latin-Quarter thing. Or perhaps it's the vague air of menace associated with whiteface. Either way, if the anti-mime jokes, Web sites, "Why We Hate Mimes" lists and mimes-versus-clowns feuds are any indication, the art of pantomime doesn't look like much of a growth industry. But Derek Martin isn't just another arty gesturist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2001
Last month the Museum of Contemporary Art posted 61 billboards throughout Los Angeles. Designed like curators' notes, with black letters set against a stark white backdrop, the billboards tersely describe features in the landscape around them, encouraging harried commuters to consider urban details they may have dismissed as mundane.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1993 | PETER J. MARSTON, Marston is an associate professor of speech communication at Cal State Northridge. and
Howard Stern, Shock-Jock. The words are almost inseparable in any media description of the now top-rated morning radio host. And although the expression may be a convenient (and by now, conventional) shorthand for describing the complex Stern, it obscures a deeper, more noble truth about Stern and his broadcast.
NEWS
July 9, 2000 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cluster of bronzed young boys floated on bodyboards in Hurricane Harbor, eager for the lifeguard to activate the wave pool. Many of them had paid $23 and waited half an hour to spend just nine minutes riding the 2-foot mechanically generated crests at Irvine's Wild Rivers Waterpark. Why a virtual beach when a real one is nearby? "There are better waves at the beach, but it's more accessible here," said Chase Paddack, dripping and winded from the pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2012 | By Neal Gabler, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Long before there were "real" housewives on television, actor-politicians and even potential celebrity politicians like Donald Trump, theme restaurants, virtual online vacations and Kim Kardashian, who makes her living by being Kim Kardashian, there was "The Image," historian Daniel Boorstin's prescient examination of a nation in transition, which celebrates the 50th anniversary of its publication this year. When "The Image" first appeared, one critic predicted that it would join William Whyte's "The Organization Man" and John Kenneth Galbraith's "The Affluent Society" as one of those seminal books that not only capture the zeitgeist but change the American mind-set.
BOOKS
January 3, 1988 | Calvin Bedient, Bedient's most recent book is "He Do the Police in Different Voices: The Waste Land and Its Protagonist" (University of Chicago Press). and
"April Galleons," John Ashbery's 11th volume of poetry not counting his recent "Selected Poems," sails in the postmodern waters whose nauseous chop and spooky fog this poet loves so well. His skill and cleverness (and something more) are such that he makes the reader appreciate, if not the waters, then at least the navigator's talents. How can you not like a gifted poet who wants you to have a good time sliding around on his deliberately slicked decks?
NEWS
November 20, 1989 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Is Disneyland simply a fun place to take the kids or out-of-town visitors? Or, in the words of two Boston researchers, is it "a modern pilgrimage site," a sanctuary from the world that evokes a sense of paradise and purity? Never mind that most people believe they go to Disneyland just to speed down the Matterhorn or splash down a mountain.
OPINION
April 5, 2005 | Frank Whitford, Frank Whitford is a curator and art writer whose essays appear in the Sunday Times of London.
Art critics used to be the butt of cruel jokes. Among other things, they were compared to eunuchs in a harem -- watching rather than doing. Nor could they write clearly and entertainingly about what others were getting up to. Notoriously, the critics' stock in trade was prose clouded by imprecise gush or impenetrable jargon. Times have changed. Everyone can understand Robert Hughes (see his latest book, "Goya").
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