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Jean Baudrillard

MAGAZINE
February 3, 2002
Something about mimes really ticks people off. Maybe it's that precious handing-out-flowers-in-the-Latin-Quarter thing. Or perhaps it's the vague air of menace associated with whiteface. Either way, if the anti-mime jokes, Web sites, "Why We Hate Mimes" lists and mimes-versus-clowns feuds are any indication, the art of pantomime doesn't look like much of a growth industry. But Derek Martin isn't just another arty gesturist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2001
Last month the Museum of Contemporary Art posted 61 billboards throughout Los Angeles. Designed like curators' notes, with black letters set against a stark white backdrop, the billboards tersely describe features in the landscape around them, encouraging harried commuters to consider urban details they may have dismissed as mundane.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1993 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Robertson Boulevard south of Melrose, among the shops offering fine linens, designer furniture and Italian pottery, there is an awning announcing Jonathan H. Kent. The window display would catch the eye of anyone even mildly aware of art galleries in Los Angeles, because it is filled by a large canvas of a woman holding a bundle of callas, a painting by Diego Rivera that is on prominent display at the Norton Simon Museum of Art.
OPINION
June 14, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
Poor Flag Day. It has to be the single most ignored national holiday in an otherwise patriotic country that loves its holidays — and no, it's not just because we don't get the day off. Nor is it because Flag Day gets lost between Memorial Day and the Fourth of July. The real reason that most Americans ignore the June 14 holiday is that it's utterly redundant. In the United States, every day is Flag Day. That's right. In this flag-crazy world, Americans are arguably the most obsessed with our national banner.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1993 | PETER J. MARSTON, Marston is an associate professor of speech communication at Cal State Northridge. and
Howard Stern, Shock-Jock. The words are almost inseparable in any media description of the now top-rated morning radio host. And although the expression may be a convenient (and by now, conventional) shorthand for describing the complex Stern, it obscures a deeper, more noble truth about Stern and his broadcast.
BOOKS
January 22, 1995 | DAVID EHRENSTEIN, David Ehrenstein is a regular contributor to Book Review
"Nicole and I shared a dream. We wanted to stop being male-dependent, give up alcohol and drugs, and open up a Starbucks coffee house." So proclaims Faye Resnick toward the close of "Nicole Brown Simpson: The Private Diary of a Life Interrupted," the controversial bestseller co-written by this much-married recovering substance abuser, former director of the John Robert Powers Finishing and Modeling School, and self-described "best friend" of the most publicized murder victim of our time.
NEWS
July 9, 2000 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cluster of bronzed young boys floated on bodyboards in Hurricane Harbor, eager for the lifeguard to activate the wave pool. Many of them had paid $23 and waited half an hour to spend just nine minutes riding the 2-foot mechanically generated crests at Irvine's Wild Rivers Waterpark. Why a virtual beach when a real one is nearby? "There are better waves at the beach, but it's more accessible here," said Chase Paddack, dripping and winded from the pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2003 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
Cambridge, Mass. For millions of TV viewers, "Survivor" is part escapism and part game show, a chance to watch attractive, scantily clad contestants battle physically and psychologically in beautiful, contrived settings, and guess who will be voted off the island each week. Who knew that it was also about "self-reflexivity"?
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