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Jean Bertranou

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1985
Having endured the Rat Pack, the Brat Pack, are we now being force fed the Wolfgang? With every Sunday morning delivery, by the Dwan's early light, we are served another portion of the paean to the puckish Puck. For some curious reason I have been eating well for over 40 years without a Wolfe in chef's clothing and must wonder . . . where are the accolades for Jean Bertranou (late and lamented)? Where are the huzzahs for Jean Bellordre of Le Cellier (alive and still brilliant)
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FOOD
September 15, 2011 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
Last week, chef John Sedlar celebrated the 30th anniversary of his seminal, erstwhile restaurant Saint Estèphe with a sparkly cocktail party and an elaborate tasting menu for a select group of admirers who remember the go-go '80s and his particular mark on American cuisine — the birth of modern Southwest cooking. As Sedlar recalls the era, "It was a time!" A time when goat cheese just started showing up on menus, fusion wasn't considered an "f word" and Sedlar's plating was as iconic as a Factory Records album sleeve.
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FOOD
April 1, 2009 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, RESTAURANT CRITIC
John Rivera Sedlar, the chef who brought us Saint Estephe, Bikini and Abiquiu (may they all rest in peace) is back and back in a big way. At the new Rivera within shouting distance of L.A. Live, the 54-year-old chef is firing on all cylinders. Rivera is terrific, one of the most exciting restaurants to debut in L.A. in the last few years. Go. I have to confess I took my own advice and ate at Rivera more times than I really needed to. I couldn't help myself -- Rivera's food is so utterly unique.
FOOD
April 1, 2009 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, RESTAURANT CRITIC
John Rivera Sedlar, the chef who brought us Saint Estephe, Bikini and Abiquiu (may they all rest in peace) is back and back in a big way. At the new Rivera within shouting distance of L.A. Live, the 54-year-old chef is firing on all cylinders. Rivera is terrific, one of the most exciting restaurants to debut in L.A. in the last few years. Go. I have to confess I took my own advice and ate at Rivera more times than I really needed to. I couldn't help myself -- Rivera's food is so utterly unique.
FOOD
September 15, 2011 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
Last week, chef John Sedlar celebrated the 30th anniversary of his seminal, erstwhile restaurant Saint Estèphe with a sparkly cocktail party and an elaborate tasting menu for a select group of admirers who remember the go-go '80s and his particular mark on American cuisine — the birth of modern Southwest cooking. As Sedlar recalls the era, "It was a time!" A time when goat cheese just started showing up on menus, fusion wasn't considered an "f word" and Sedlar's plating was as iconic as a Factory Records album sleeve.
FOOD
July 25, 1991 | RUTH REICHL, TIMES FOOD EDITOR
When L'Ermitage opened in 1975 it was a restaurant for rich people. When it closed last week it was an institution. Why should you care? Because even if you've never been to an expensive restaurant--and have no intention of setting foot inside of one--it changed the way you eat. When Jean Bertranou opened L'Ermitage, what we all understood to be "good food" was Continental; it relied mainly on meat. "American food," of course, meant hot dogs and hamburgers and steak.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990 | Kathie Jenkins \f7
Michel Blanchet of L'Ermitage, 730 N. La Cienega Blvd., West Hollywood. (213) 652-5840. Style: The last bastion of really correct French cooking in L.A. Blanchet has been at the restaurant since its beginning. Setting: Dark and muted. Recommended: Truffle soup (when in season); saddle of rabbit; home-cured salmon. Cost per person: $45-$65. Mark Carter of Duplex, 1930 Hillhurst Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 663-2430.
FOOD
July 25, 1991 | LAURIE OCHOA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the late late '70s, back when Cher and Gregg were still an item, the tiny brick parking lot in front of L'Ermitage was where Rolls-Royces came to park. It's said that the restaurant's famous chef-owner, Jean Bertranou, would occasionally slip out of the kitchen and drive the few blocks to his chief competitor, Ma Maison.
FOOD
May 30, 1991 | KATHIE JENKINS
Jonathan Waxman, America's most famous chef without a restaurant, is about to give up his title. He and Stephen Singer, owner of a San Francisco wine shop (and husband of Alice Waters), have begun construction on a new restaurant in the Napa Valley. Located midway between Napa and Yountville on State Highway 29, the restaurant as yet has no name. "Nothing is final yet," says Waxman. "The only thing I can say is that we've put in a foundation and a liquor license has been applied for."
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | MIKE SPENCER, Mike Spencer is a member of The Times Orange County Edition staff. and
Jean Pierre Lemanissier is the epitome of the French chef; the name alone conjures up visions of delectable fines herbes, clafouti and bechamel sauce. And if the name doesn't impress, the resume certainly should: an apprenticeship under the legendary Paul Bocuse in Lyon, chef de partie at London's famed Connaught hotel, sous-chef for the impeccable Jean Bertranou at L.A.'
FOOD
July 25, 1991 | RUTH REICHL, TIMES FOOD EDITOR
When L'Ermitage opened in 1975 it was a restaurant for rich people. When it closed last week it was an institution. Why should you care? Because even if you've never been to an expensive restaurant--and have no intention of setting foot inside of one--it changed the way you eat. When Jean Bertranou opened L'Ermitage, what we all understood to be "good food" was Continental; it relied mainly on meat. "American food," of course, meant hot dogs and hamburgers and steak.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990 | Kathie Jenkins \f7
Michel Blanchet of L'Ermitage, 730 N. La Cienega Blvd., West Hollywood. (213) 652-5840. Style: The last bastion of really correct French cooking in L.A. Blanchet has been at the restaurant since its beginning. Setting: Dark and muted. Recommended: Truffle soup (when in season); saddle of rabbit; home-cured salmon. Cost per person: $45-$65. Mark Carter of Duplex, 1930 Hillhurst Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 663-2430.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1985
Having endured the Rat Pack, the Brat Pack, are we now being force fed the Wolfgang? With every Sunday morning delivery, by the Dwan's early light, we are served another portion of the paean to the puckish Puck. For some curious reason I have been eating well for over 40 years without a Wolfe in chef's clothing and must wonder . . . where are the accolades for Jean Bertranou (late and lamented)? Where are the huzzahs for Jean Bellordre of Le Cellier (alive and still brilliant)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1986 | RUTH REICHL
L'Ermitage, 730 N. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 652-5840. Dinner, Monday-Saturday. All major credit cards accepted. Valet parking. Dinner for two, food only, $75-$120. People who care about food tend to think of restaurants in L.A. as B.B. and A.B.--before and after Bertranou. The chef himself arrived here, and immediately wrote to France saying, "California is one of the most beautiful countries I have seen in my life, but when it comes to cooking, forget it."
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | MIKE SPENCER
Byron Gemmell has long been one of Orange County's better-known chefs, but his popularity has risen even higher since taking on the task of returning Chanteclair to its former culinary glory. Gemmell took the menu--described by one Times critic as "a tired affair"--and completely revamped it, tilting it toward a more unpretentious and simpler style of cooking. The Irvine restaurant's new lunch fare is a good example.
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