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Jean Charest

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NEWS
August 5, 1994 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean Charest might be forgiven if he feels a bit like the man who inherits the family mansion when a favorite aunt dies--and arrives to find the house burned to the ground. Charest, 35, is the new leader of Canada's Progressive Conservative Party, and it has fallen to him to rebuild on the wreckage left by his two predecessors, former Prime Ministers Brian Mulroney and Kim Campbell. Charest first sought the party leadership in June, 1993, when Mulroney gave up the post after 10 years.
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NEWS
August 5, 1994 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean Charest might be forgiven if he feels a bit like the man who inherits the family mansion when a favorite aunt dies--and arrives to find the house burned to the ground. Charest, 35, is the new leader of Canada's Progressive Conservative Party, and it has fallen to him to rebuild on the wreckage left by his two predecessors, former Prime Ministers Brian Mulroney and Kim Campbell. Charest first sought the party leadership in June, 1993, when Mulroney gave up the post after 10 years.
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SPORTS
June 14, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
In an apparent attempt to win back the hearts of the Canadian people, Ben Johnson delivered an emotional mea culpa here Tuesday, accepting full responsibility for eight years of anabolic steroid use and advising young athletes that they should not cheat. After testifying Monday that he had simply followed orders from his coach when he began taking steroids and other banned performance-enhancing substances in the early 1980s, Johnson told the Canadian government's commission of inquiry into drug use that he would accept the blame.
WORLD
April 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Quebec Liberal Leader Jean Charest, whose party swept the separatist Parti Quebecois from power, said he will soon unveil a transition government as the French-speaking province moves to launch cooperation with the rest of Canada. Charest's Liberals, who favor Canadian unity, won 76 seats in the Quebec legislature, against 45 seats for the Parti Quebecois and four for the conservative Action Democratique. The transfer of power is set for the last week of April.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The pro-independence provincial government of Quebec has called an election for Nov. 30. The decision, announced by Premier Lucien Bouchard, officially launches a campaign battle between two charismatic politicians who disagree over whether the mostly French-speaking province should stay in Canada. Bouchard is seeking a second term for his separatist Parti Quebecois. But opponent Jean Charest of the Quebec Liberal Party carries the hopes of a united Canada.
NEWS
June 22, 1993
Canada's prime minister-elect, Kim Campbell, faces a busy week as she must assemble her Cabinet before being sworn in as Canada's first female prime minister on Friday. The 46-year-old lawyer has taken a low-key approach since winning the leadership of the ruling Progressive Conservative party last week, trying among other things to patch up her relationship with Jean Charest, 34, the current minister of environment and the man she defeated for the top job.
SPORTS
June 14, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
In an apparent attempt to win back the hearts of the Canadian people, Ben Johnson delivered an emotional mea culpa here Tuesday, accepting full responsibility for eight years of anabolic steroid use and advising young athletes that they should not cheat. After testifying Monday that he had simply followed orders from his coach when he began taking steroids and other banned performance-enhancing substances in the early 1980s, Johnson told the Canadian government's commission of inquiry into drug use that he would accept the blame.
SPORTS
January 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney said today he has accepted the resignation of Sports Minister Jean Charest, who is embroiled in a controversy over whether he tried to influence a judge in a case involving a Canadian athlete. "He offered to submit his resignation and I accepted it," Mulroney told the House of Commons.
NEWS
November 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
With the rest of Canada watching warily, Quebec voters will make a momentous choice Monday between an incumbent provincial leader who favors independence and an underdog challenger seeking to end the threat of secession. If Premier Lucien Bouchard's Parti Quebecois wins the election, he has pledged to hold a vote on the province leaving Canada whenever he thinks that the separatists can win. Some militants in his party already have an unofficial motto: "A country for the year 2000."
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