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Jean Claude Bajeux

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NEWS
July 9, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Anti-government forces called off a general strike Wednesday after paralyzing Haiti for six of the past nine days, but they vowed to keep pressing for the fall of the country's military-led junta. The strike organizers set a Monday deadline for the junta to resign. They proposed the formation of a new junta that would be dominated by civilians.
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WORLD
January 18, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
His victims remember Baby Doc Duvalier. The long periods in hiding, friends who simply vanished, activists who went into the Fort Dimanche prison never to emerge, or to emerge as broken human beings. In Duvalier's 15 years in power and during the regime of his father before him, as many as 30,000 Haitian civilians are believed to have been killed, countless others tortured, and hundreds of thousands forced into exile, human rights groups say. And the younger Duvalier is suspected of stealing up to $300 million from the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation.
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WORLD
January 18, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
His victims remember Baby Doc Duvalier. The long periods in hiding, friends who simply vanished, activists who went into the Fort Dimanche prison never to emerge, or to emerge as broken human beings. In Duvalier's 15 years in power and during the regime of his father before him, as many as 30,000 Haitian civilians are believed to have been killed, countless others tortured, and hundreds of thousands forced into exile, human rights groups say. And the younger Duvalier is suspected of stealing up to $300 million from the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Fears of an armed uprising by civilian thugs and graft-tainted officers deposed in Haiti's "sergeants' revolt" and hopes for clear and rapid steps toward long-thwarted democracy preoccupied both soldiers and political leaders Saturday as the officers and noncoms now running the country completed their first week of power in an atmosphere of unusual calm. The danger of a possible counterattack by loyalists of ousted Gen.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Fears of an armed uprising by civilian thugs and graft-tainted officers deposed in Haiti's "sergeants' revolt" and hopes for clear and rapid steps toward long-thwarted democracy preoccupied both soldiers and political leaders Saturday as the officers and noncoms now running the country completed their first week of power in an atmosphere of unusual calm. The danger of a possible counterattack by loyalists of ousted Gen.
NEWS
February 6, 1987
Haiti's government announced strict new security measures that critics said signaled the beginning of a new dictatorship. A government communique said that police will intervene without warrants when a suspect is caught in terrorist or seditious acts.
NEWS
July 11, 1988 | Associated Press
A human rights activist was found stabbed to death today in a jeep just outside Port-au-Prince, another human rights leader and a radio station said. Lafontant Joseph was beaten before he was killed, private station Radio Metropole reported. Jean-Claude Bajeux, director of the Ecumenical Center for Human Rights, said the body was identified by the victim's wife, Raymonde Joseph, director of the Haitian Woman's Committee Against Torture. "This murder . . .
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Lt. Gen. Prosper Avril arrived in the United States this morning, two days after the military ruler was driven from power by widespread unrest. The deposed leader and his family left Haiti aboard a U.S. Air Force transport plane and arrived at Homestead Air Force Base, 25 miles south of Miami, the State Department said. The U.S. Atlantic Command in Norfolk, Va., said Avril and his party were to be driven to Boca Raton, Fla.
NEWS
February 25, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
A former police chief of Port-au-Prince who headed a military unit known for its use of torture has left for exile in Brazil with the permission of the new government of Haiti. The flight of Col. Albert Pierre indicates that the ruling National Council that succeeded ex-President Jean-Claude Duvalier is shying away from prosecuting deposed officials for human rights abuses. Three of the five members of the National Council are armed forces officers.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Presidential candidate Yves Volel was shot and killed by police Tuesday as he delivered a speech near police headquarters demanding freedom for an alleged political prisoner, witnesses said. A reporter from TeleHaiti, a local independent television network, said that plainclothes officers walked out of the headquarters of the Criminal Investigations Section, approached Volel, beat him and then shot him.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Anti-government forces called off a general strike Wednesday after paralyzing Haiti for six of the past nine days, but they vowed to keep pressing for the fall of the country's military-led junta. The strike organizers set a Monday deadline for the junta to resign. They proposed the formation of a new junta that would be dominated by civilians.
NEWS
February 17, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
All were Haitian exiles of sorts but with quite different hopes and dreams. One, Jean Claude Bajeux, a former priest and political activist, was expelled from the country 24 years ago under suspicion of opposing then-dictator Francois (Papa Doc) Duvalier. While he was in exile, his mother, two sisters and two brothers disappeared, presumed murder victims of Duvalier's dreaded political enforcers, the Tontons Macoutes. Now, gray and balding, the activist had flown by commercial jet back to Haiti.
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