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Jean Claude Ganga

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November 26, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Africa's top Olympic official said his organization would back South Africa's bid to serve as host for the 2004 Games. Jean-Claude Ganga, Congolese president of the Assn. of National Olympic Committees of Africa, said after a two-day meeting of the group in Johannesburg, South Africa, that members would back a bid "to bring the Olympics where they ought to be held."
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November 26, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Africa's top Olympic official said his organization would back South Africa's bid to serve as host for the 2004 Games. Jean-Claude Ganga, Congolese president of the Assn. of National Olympic Committees of Africa, said after a two-day meeting of the group in Johannesburg, South Africa, that members would back a bid "to bring the Olympics where they ought to be held."
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NEWS
March 19, 1991
A delegation of the International Olympic Committee arrives Friday in Johannesburg on a fact-finding mission that many South Africans are predicting will lead to the country's speedy return to world sporting competition, perhaps in time for the 1992 games in Barcelona, Spain. South African sporting administrators previously won praise from longtime opponent and head of Africa's National Olympic Committee, Jean Claude Ganga, for establishing multiracial bodies to control sports in the country.
SPORTS
August 23, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the leaders of the anti-apartheid sports movement, returning from a fact-finding trip to South Africa, says it is conceivable that the isolated nation could return to Olympic competition by 1996. "The signs are very positive, very favorable," said Sam Ramsamy, executive chairman of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee, in a phone interview from his home in London. "If you would have looked at the situation 18 months ago, you would have seen a very different picture.
SPORTS
March 18, 1999
The six International Olympic Committee members expelled Wednesday in the Salt Lake City bribery case (60 votes needed to expel; not all members present for all votes): AGUSTIN ARROYO, 75, Ecuador. IOC member since 1968.* Utah investigators said Arroyo's family received almost $21,000 in cash and benefits from Salt Lake bidders. Most of the money went to his stepdaughter, but the IOC found Arroyo himself received almost $7,000 for condominium fees on a ski vacation.
SPORTS
January 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
Insisting he bribed no one and did nothing wrong, Tom Welch, the former president of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee, contended his organization acted responsibly in its winning bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics. Welch is accused of bribing IOC officials in the biggest corruption scandal in Olympic history. The Deseret News reported Sunday that Welch acknowledged cash payments and gifts to IOC members, but called them contributions. "We never bribed anybody.
SPORTS
October 18, 1986 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Attorney Anita DeFrantz of Los Angeles, a leading opponent of the United States-led boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games, was among four new members elected to the International Olympic Committee Friday. Also chosen on the closing day of the IOC's 91st session were Kim Un Yong of South Korea, Charalambos Nikolaou of Greece and Jean-Claude Ganga of the Congo. DeFrantz, Kim and Nikolaou filled vacancies left by the deaths of IOC members from their countries.
SPORTS
January 30, 1999 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With 14 of its members already implicated in the Salt Lake City bribery scandal, the International Olympic Committee is still investigating as the inquiry panel expands its probe to other cities that have bid for the Olympic Games during the last decade.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-one years after it was expelled from Olympic competition for its racially discriminatory policy of apartheid, South Africa won readmission from the International Olympic Committee here Tuesday, opening the door for South African athletes to participate in the 1992 Olympic Games. The historic decision, based largely on the South African Parliament's repeal of key apartheid statutes in June, is expected to give a big boost to the reform movement of South African President Frederik W.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Olympic bribery scandal widened dramatically Friday when the president of the Australian Olympic Committee said he offered $70,000 in inducements to two International Olympic Committee members from Africa the night before Sydney won the 2000 Summer Games by two votes. Australia's senior IOC member, R.
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