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Jean Claude Lauzon

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September 11, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
After his first film, "Night Zoo," received a standing ovation at the Cannes Film Festival five years ago, French Canadian writer-director Jean-Claude Lauzon went out into the street to find blocked traffic and more applause. He literally pinched himself. But it didn't help. "I said to myself," he remembers, " 'This is not the answer to your anxieties.' I always thought it would be like climbing a hill, at some point you reach the top and start going down. People are waving, things get easier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
After his first film, "Night Zoo," received a standing ovation at the Cannes Film Festival five years ago, French Canadian writer-director Jean-Claude Lauzon went out into the street to find blocked traffic and more applause. He literally pinched himself. But it didn't help. "I said to myself," he remembers, " 'This is not the answer to your anxieties.' I always thought it would be like climbing a hill, at some point you reach the top and start going down. People are waving, things get easier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1998
I'm glad that there are artistically uncompromising filmmakers like the recently deceased French Canadian director Jean-Claude Lauzon (Film Clips, by Kenneth Turan, Jan. 11). For him, a movie wasn't just something to watch, but rather something to experience, to become involved in and to interact with. Not just a casual visual encounter but a total-body experience. He didn't make a movie, he literally lived it. KENNETH L. ZIMMERMAN Huntington Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Director Rob Reiner's latest film "The Princess Bride" was a lonely American honoree among mostly Canadian award-winners at the Toronto Film Festival. The festival's jury, announcing the prizes Sunday, gave "Princess Bride" the Labatt's Award for the most popular film as voted by the audiences. The Toronto-CITY-TV Award, worth $25,000 (Canadian), went to Atom Egoyan for his "Family Viewing," while Kay Armitage won the Canadian Award for her film "Artist on Fire."
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | Kenneth Turan
Nothing describes "Leolo," nothing does it justice. It's a film you feel more than analyze, a movie that offers emotional rather than literal images. And though it is as intoxicated with language as it is with images, it comes so strongly from memory and the subconscious that it resists tidy summation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Nothing describes "Leolo," nothing does it justice. It's a film you feel more than analyze, a movie that makes emotional rather than literal sense. And though it is as intoxicated with language as it is with images, it comes so strongly from memory and the subconscious that it resists tidy summation. Without boundaries, a fever dream of imagination, poetry and love, it simply must be seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
It's understandable why Jean-Claude Lauzon's "Night Zoo" (at the AMC Century 14) has become the most honored Canadian film in years, perhaps ever. It has passion, energy and flash, not qualities we usually associate with the generally sedate Canadian cinema. It is far from flawless but is venturesome and entertaining, marking an exciting feature debut for Lauzon.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1988 | JACK MATHEWS, Times Staff Writer
Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci was the chosen one at the recent Oscar show, but he didn't get a call from the 1,233 international film directors polled for the 1987 Orsons. The Orsons, named after the late Orson Welles, who would have been 78 today, are voted in seven categories and the big winner this year was France's Louis Malle.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
The Festival of New Quebec Films, with 11 pictures, runs Friday through Nov. 12 at the Monica 4-Plex. In the Canadian cinema the language barrier acts as a protection for its French-speaking film industry; its English-speaking film makers are constantly faced with the competition of American films and with being coopted on their own ground by U.S. productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1998 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
It happened late one night several weeks ago. Leaving Hollywood's Raleigh Studios after a screening, alone and nearly the last off the lot, I turned left onto Bronson as usual. Suddenly, all in a rush, I found myself overwhelmed and near tears. And I knew, even before the feeling became a thought, that I would be writing about Jean-Claude Lauzon.
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