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Jean Claude Leroyer

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BUSINESS
January 29, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Tuesday ordered the largest bus shelter company in Southern California to stop selling investments in what the Securities and Exchange Commission alleges was a $48-million pyramid scheme that duped more than 4,500 investors. U.S. District Judge William Keller granted the request by the SEC, which late Monday filed a lawsuit against Metro Display Advertising Inc. of Tustin alleging fraud and misappropriation by company President Jean Claude LeRoyer and his wife Karen.
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BUSINESS
March 4, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean Claude Leroyer, founder of an Orange County bus stop advertising firm that defrauded more than 1,100 investors of $46.4 million between 1986 and 1991, was sentenced Wednesday to 46 months in federal prison. Also sentenced in federal court in Santa Ana were three salesmen recently convicted of marketing fraudulent investments in the Irvine-based company, Metro Display Advertising, and the company's former chief financial officer.
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BUSINESS
March 4, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean Claude Leroyer, founder of an Orange County bus stop advertising firm that defrauded more than 1,100 investors of $46.4 million between 1986 and 1991, was sentenced Wednesday to 46 months in federal prison. Also sentenced in federal court in Santa Ana were three salesmen recently convicted of marketing fraudulent investments in the Irvine-based company, Metro Display Advertising, and the company's former chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Entrepreneur Jean Claude LeRoyer, accused of bilking up to $43 million from mostly elderly investors in a city bus shelter-advertising scheme, pleaded guilty Wednesday to six charges of mail fraud and filing false income tax returns. His wife, Karen, a former bookkeeper for the Tustin company that LeRoyer headed, pleaded guilty to three counts of filing false tax reports. LeRoyer built his Metro Display Advertising Inc.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Entrepreneur Jean Claude LeRoyer, accused of bilking up to $43 million from mostly elderly investors in a city bus shelter-advertising scheme, pleaded guilty Wednesday to six charges of mail fraud and filing false income tax returns. His wife, Karen, a former bookkeeper for the Tustin company that LeRoyer headed, pleaded guilty to three counts of filing false tax reports. LeRoyer built his Metro Display Advertising Inc.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1999 | Edmund Sanders
Karen LeRoyer, the wife of Metro Display Advertising founder Jean Claude LeRoyer, has been sentenced to five months in prison for her role in an investment scheme which raised nearly $47 million before collapsing in 1991. U.S. District Judge Alicemarie H. Stotler rejected pleas by the LeRoyers that sending Karen LeRoyer of Fountain Valley to prison would leave no one to care for the couple's 8-year-old daughter.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1999 | John O'Dell
Jean Claude Leroyer, founder of an Orange County bus stop advertising firm that defrauded more than 1,100 investors of $46.4 million between 1986 and 1991, was sentenced to 46 months in federal prison. Also sentenced in federal court in Santa Ana were three salesmen recently convicted of marketing fraudulent investments in the Irvine-based company, Metro Display Advertising, and the company's former chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1998 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three former sales agents for an Irvine bus stop advertising company have been convicted of roles in a pyramid scheme that swindled 1,200 mainly elderly investors out of $46 million. The salesmen, convicted of fraud Wednesday by a federal court jury in Santa Ana, had sold Metro Display Advertising Inc. bus stop shelters to investors for $10,000 each. Assistant U.S.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI searched the Orange and Los Angeles county offices of the beleaguered Metro Display Advertising bus shelter company and the Newport Beach house of its founder Tuesday, carting off records and documents as part of an investment fraud investigation.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
It's a case of much ado about nothing. And that's exactly what the fellow in the ad is wearing. It wasn't enough for Bus Stop Shelters of California, an Irvine firm that owns some of those covered shelters that display giant ads at bus corners. The story started in May, when Barry & Associates, a Woodland Hills advertising shop, dreamed up a marketing campaign for an Orange County client that distributes fax machines.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Tuesday ordered the largest bus shelter company in Southern California to stop selling investments in what the Securities and Exchange Commission alleges was a $48-million pyramid scheme that duped more than 4,500 investors. U.S. District Judge William Keller granted the request by the SEC, which late Monday filed a lawsuit against Metro Display Advertising Inc. of Tustin alleging fraud and misappropriation by company President Jean Claude LeRoyer and his wife Karen.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | MARJORIE MURRAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Malibu's council-elect on Tuesday rejected as inappropriate a $20,000 unsolicited check it received from a company that wants to put 20 bus shelters in Malibu. The company, Bustop Shelters of California, does not need the council's permission to build the shelters, but company spokesman Al Lopez told the council members that the check was a "revenue advancement" for allowing the company to erect the enclosures along Pacific Coast Highway.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, Metro Display Advertising was beset by the kind of problems that would have sent most companies into oblivion. The bus shelter company filed for bankruptcy after federal regulators alleged that the founder had actually devised a Ponzi fraud scheme, which resulted in the FBI searching company offices. Advertising sales were dismal and hundreds of investors were clamoring for their money back.
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