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Jean Claude Van Itallie

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1999 | Stage Review F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A lion of avant-garde theater in the 1960s, playwright Jean-Claude van Itallie has been a practicing Tibetan Buddhist for more than 30 years. He begins his one-man play, "War, Sex and Dreams," at Highways, by blessing the space, chanting melodically. We are lulled, prepared for a calming meditation on life and art. Then, Van Itallie's chant slides into a belted rendition of "Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'." Call it a mission statement for this freewheeling hodgepodge of reminiscences.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1999 | Stage Review F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A lion of avant-garde theater in the 1960s, playwright Jean-Claude van Itallie has been a practicing Tibetan Buddhist for more than 30 years. He begins his one-man play, "War, Sex and Dreams," at Highways, by blessing the space, chanting melodically. We are lulled, prepared for a calming meditation on life and art. Then, Van Itallie's chant slides into a belted rendition of "Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'." Call it a mission statement for this freewheeling hodgepodge of reminiscences.
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BOOKS
July 3, 1994
While I appreciate the courage and accomplishments of the writers of the "Violet Quill Club," and Jameson Currier's survey of them in his review in your pages (Book Review, May 1), I take gentle exception to his penultimate statement, " . . . the Quill was the first really 'gay' literary movement." From 1961, when Doric Wilson produced his play, "Now She Dances" at the Caffe Cino in New York, there was a gay literary movement in full force. Doric's play was followed by fully gay works by Lanford Wilson, myself, William M. Hoffman, George Birmisa, Robert Heide, Daniel Haben Clark and Jean-Claude Van Itallie, first at the Cino then at La Mama, the Old Reliable and at theaters all over Manhattan and thence worldwide.
BOOKS
July 3, 1994
While I appreciate the courage and accomplishments of the writers of the "Violet Quill Club," and Jameson Currier's survey of them in his review in your pages (Book Review, May 1), I take gentle exception to his penultimate statement, " . . . the Quill was the first really 'gay' literary movement." From 1961, when Doric Wilson produced his play, "Now She Dances" at the Caffe Cino in New York, there was a gay literary movement in full force. Doric's play was followed by fully gay works by Lanford Wilson, myself, William M. Hoffman, George Birmisa, Robert Heide, Daniel Haben Clark and Jean-Claude Van Itallie, first at the Cino then at La Mama, the Old Reliable and at theaters all over Manhattan and thence worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Glover Goes Forward: Stage-film-television actor John Glover will headline Alan Ayckbourn's new social satire, "Henceforward," opening Nov. 14 at the Mark Taper Forum. Glover, whose movies have been as diverse as "Gremlins 2: The Last Batch," "Scrooged" and "The Chocolate War," was last seen at the Taper in 1987 as an aphasia victim in Jean-Claude van Itallie's "The Traveler."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2005 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Two musicals at the Music Center, largely imported from previous New York productions, lead the nominations for the 2004 Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards, announced today, with "Caroline, or Change" winning seven nods and "A Little Night Music" netting six.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
The central horror of the 20th Century is the Holocaust. Perhaps it's too horrible to be dealt with head-on in the theater. "Paradise Ghetto," at Actors Alley Repertory Theatre, is another attempt to make epic drama of it. And again all that comes out are cliches. The playwright of record is Jean Claude van Itallie, but don't look for the imagination that went into "America, Hurrah" or "The Traveller."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jacques Levy, a Broadway theater director most noted for the musical "Oh! Calcutta!," died of cancer Sept. 30. He was 69. Active in off-Broadway and regional theater, Levy directed the production's original staging in 1969 and its revival in 1976 for a total of more than 7,200 performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2007 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
The discoveries of the acting studio coil toward eternity in "The Serpent" at the Unknown Theater. This arresting barebones take on Jean-Claude van Itallie's Obie-winning experimental landmark exists in that realm where the theatrical and the sacred convene. First performed in Rome in 1968, "The Serpent" was born out of collaboration with director Joseph Chaikin and his Open Theatre troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
It's always interesting to get the British reaction to plays recently seen in Los Angeles. John Patrick Shanley's "Savage in Limbo," which got a beautiful production last summer at the Cast Theater, opened at London's Gate Theater last month to mixed-positive reviews. The critics showed some resistance to its typically American setup--five drifters spouting off in a bar--but most agreed that Shanley was trying to get at something real and all agreed that he knew how to throw the language around.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
Mikhail Bulgakov meets Sergei Eisenstein at Andy Warhol's Factory in “Moskva.” This ornate take on Bulgakov's “The Master and Margarita” is a nobly ambitious, surreally unhinged deep-dish bowl of dramaturgical borscht. Bulgakov's novel is itself an epic pastiche on the Faust legend, assaulting Stalin's regime with equal parts allegory, polemic, slapstick and satire. Its scenario intertwines the titular suppressed novelist (Etol Dolen) and disillusioned mistress (Kristina Drager)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
As celebrity love triangles go, among the most complicated -- and historically significant -- was one that found the 18th century French writer Voltaire caught in an emotional tug of war between his mistress, the brilliant aristocratic Emilie du Chatelet, and his admirer, Frederick the Great, the poet-warrior king of Prussia. Their amorous adventures helped shape the turbulent intellectual, political and religious currents in an age of cultural transition.
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