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Jean Cocteau

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September 19, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Jean Cocteau has received a bit more ink than usual this year thanks to the No. 1 bestseller "The Da Vinci Code," in which novelist Dan Brown asserts that the famed avant-garde French artist was a member, along with Leonardo Da Vinci, Isaac Newton and Victor Hugo, of a secret society called the Priory of Scion. But this new notoriety is not the reason the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's film department is devoting the next three weekends to Cocteau's magical cinema.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Maybe it's the hint of Bastille Day in the air, or perhaps it's just an opportunity to use some playful alliteration, but Film Independent at LACMA is going all Gallic on us in July with a series cheerfully titled French Film Fridays. Whatever the reason, it's a pleasure to welcome these screenings to town. The eight rarely seen movies spread over four Fridays are not only a tonic to experience; they also remind us of how strong and wide-ranging the French passion for film has been.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth Anger, best known for telling no-holds-barred tales of Tinseltown's seamier scandals in his books "Hollywood Babylon" and "Hollywood Babylon II," showed a kinder, gentler side Friday as he paid homage to Jean Cocteau. The French poet, artist, film maker and choreographer was "a very lovable man," Anger told a luncheon audience of about 40. His talk was part of the Cocteau Centenary Festival at UC Irvine. Anger's fascination with Cocteau was sparked when he was growing up in Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Eve Adamson, the founder of the Jean Cocteau Repertory company in New York City and the group's artistic director until 1989, has died. She was 68. Adamson died at her home in New York City on Sunday, said her brother, Lloyd Crisfield of Redondo Beach. The cause was unclear, he said. She had complained to him of flu-like conditions last Saturday. She founded the Cocteau Repertory theater in 1971 as an ensemble company of actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
The Cocteau Centenary Festival, devoted to French artist and writer Jean Cocteau (1889-1963), continues this week at UC Irvine, with lectures, performances, films, gallery exhibits and a symposium. "The program (is) an attempt to explore every facet of his work," said Tony Clark, executive director of the Severin Wunderman Museum, who is coordinating American participation in the international celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
"Fame is the consequence of a misunderstanding. It is like the crowd which gathers around the scene of an accident.... A few people stop and wonder what is happening. Others imitate them, question them. Then comes the crowd, which no longer sees anything.... Since everyone invents the accident, no one knows what has happened. Gradually the accident is distorted...." The 62-year-old Jean Cocteau made this observation in his diary on Feb.
BOOKS
June 19, 1988 | ALEX RAKSIN
Where Sergei Diaghilev told artists, " Etonnez-moi "--surprise me--Jean Cocteau, France's artistic chameleon, went a step further, suggesting that artists should "throw a bomb." Cocteau took his own advice, creating and then destroying elaborate styles and theories, not only in his plays, novels, films and librettos for opera, but in his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Jean Cocteau wanted Greta Garbo for the Queen in "The Eagle With Two Heads," when it opened on Broadway 42 years ago. Tallulah Bankhead landed the role instead. The result was, by Cocteau's own account, an unmitigated disaster. If all the resources of an elaborate and expensive Broadway production couldn't get "The Eagle With Two Heads" off the ground, can an effort gamely powered by no more than a windup propeller at the Alternative Repertory Theatre in Santa Ana? It can't.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Despite his extraordinary precocity, Jean Cocteau considered himself a late starter who didn't find himself as an artist until he was well past 30. In his diaries, looking at his career through hindsight, Cocteau singled out "Orphee" as the first of several key works "in which I had found my way." Cocteau was justly proud of the play. Written in 1925 and produced a year later when he was 37, it announced themes that obsessed him as no other work had done.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1989 | Chris Pasles
Jean Cocteau is best known as a film maker and playwright, but he also left his mark in the ballet world by creating scenarios for Diaghilev-era ballets such as Fokine's "Le Dieu Bleu," Massine's "Parade" and Nijinska's "Le Train Bleu." Strangely, the one dance work that is being offered as part of this month's Cocteau Centenary Festival at UC Irvine is Nijinska's "Les Biches," for which Cocteau's contributions are harder to pin down.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Jean Cocteau has received a bit more ink than usual this year thanks to the No. 1 bestseller "The Da Vinci Code," in which novelist Dan Brown asserts that the famed avant-garde French artist was a member, along with Leonardo Da Vinci, Isaac Newton and Victor Hugo, of a secret society called the Priory of Scion. But this new notoriety is not the reason the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's film department is devoting the next three weekends to Cocteau's magical cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2002 | Kenneth Turan
A remarkable print of Jean Cocteau's 1946 Beauty and the Beast, struck in France for the 100th anniversary of cinema, has reached this country. Writer-director Cocteau's "Beauty" gets its strength from the restraint of his version. "Children believe what we tell them," he writes in the film's prologue. "I ask of you a little of this childlike simplicity." It will be richly rewarded. * Nuart Theater, 11272 Santa Monica Blvd., West L.A. Through Thursday. (310) 478-6379.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2000 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disney and "Beauty and the Beast" may seem synonymous, but there are many ways to tell the 18th century French fairy tale, and a theater company out of Pennsylvania has its own ideas. Landis & Company Theatre of Magic's touring production of "Beauty and the Beast," in Thousand Oaks and Long Beach this weekend, was inspired by Jean Cocteau's hauntingly romantic 1946 film "La Belle et la Be^te." It's meant as much for adult audiences as for children.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1995 | MARK SWED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Philip Glass has a history with Hollywood. He has contributed music to feature films with aspirations toward art (Paul Schrader's "Mishima" and Errol Morris' "Thin Blue Line") and to those without ("Candyman" and its sequel).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Huntington Art Gallery at the University of Texas at Austin is poised to become the new home of the 2,000-piece collection of Jean Cocteau's art owned by the Severin Wunderman Museum, which closed here last month. The Austin campus is an obvious choice because the university's Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center is the repository of a major collection of Cocteau archival materials, said to be second in size only to the Wunderman collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deluged by anxious callers after reports that the Severin Wunderman Museum would close today , pending the transfer of its holdings to another institution, museum officials have decided to keep the galleries open through Friday, according to publicist Mary Crost. (Today was the original closing date of the current exhibition, "Vaslav Nijinsky: Art of the World's Greatest Dancer," on loan from the Nijinsky Foundation in Phoenix.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | MAX JACOBSON, Max Jacobson is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to The Times Orange County Edition.
To the casual visitor, the industrial expanse east of the San Diego Freeway known as the Irvine Spectrum area appears as nothing more than another example of high-tech, exurban development. Yet, there are surprises in here, including a museum that is one of the most distinctive and compelling of all Orange County destinations. 11 to 12:30: It's doubtful that you have heard the name Severin Wunderman.
NEWS
November 3, 1994
The 10-year-old Severin Wunderman Museum in Irvine was founded by Severin Wunderman, creator and board chairman of the Severin Group, which manufactures and distributes Gucci timepieces worldwide. The Belgium-born Wunderman, 55, developed a fascination as a youth with seminal 20th-Century French artist, writer and filmmaker Jean Cocteau, to whom the museum is dedicated. Wunderman's Laguna Beach home (up for sale) is one of his five residences in the United States, Switzerland and France.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | KATHRYN BOLD
As the former live-in love of Pablo Picasso, wife of Dr. Jonas Salk and an artist in her own right, Francoise Gilot knows a thing or two about style. Because of her personal style and role in the arts, the Severin Wunderman Museum in Irvine chose Gilot as the recipient of its 1994 Jean Cocteau International Style Award.
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