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Jean Doumanian

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BUSINESS
May 11, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Woody Allen has sued longtime friend and producer Jean Doumanian, accusing her of cheating him out of unspecified earnings from his last eight films. The comedic icon, who made his out-of-control neuroses a central character in many of the dozens of films he wrote and directed, contends that Doumanian and her production company have refused to give him regular and accurate revenue information.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 2002 | ANITA M. BUSCH and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Woody Allen and his former producing partner, Jean Doumanian, reached an out-of-court settlement late Tuesday, ending an ugly and at times highly personal dispute between the filmmaker and his longtime friend and associate. Allen last May sued Doumanian and her production company, Sweetland Films, as well as Sweetland producer Jacqui Safra, accusing them of cheating him of earnings on eight films and seeking $12 million he said he was owed.
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BUSINESS
June 26, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Woody Allen's longtime friend and movie producer Jean Doumanian claims the director overspent on films that failed to make money, according to a countersuit the producer filed Monday. Responding to Allen's breach-of-contract suit filed against her last month, Doumanian denied ever cheating Allen.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Woody Allen's longtime friend and movie producer Jean Doumanian claims the director overspent on films that failed to make money, according to a countersuit the producer filed Monday. Responding to Allen's breach-of-contract suit filed against her last month, Doumanian denied ever cheating Allen.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2002 | ANITA M. BUSCH and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Woody Allen and his former producing partner, Jean Doumanian, reached an out-of-court settlement late Tuesday, ending an ugly and at times highly personal dispute between the filmmaker and his longtime friend and associate. Allen last May sued Doumanian and her production company, Sweetland Films, as well as Sweetland producer Jacqui Safra, accusing them of cheating him of earnings on eight films and seeking $12 million he said he was owed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992 | Jane Galbraith
Hollywood Reporter, Nov. 25, Page 17, Col. 1: "Letty Aronson, former vp of the Museum of Television and Radio in New York, has been named vp at New York-based Jean Doumanian Prods" . . . and eight more paragraphs that detail both Aronson's credentials and Doumanian's credits. Very straight, hot-off-the-press-release kinda stuff--unless you knew how to read between the lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | GENE SEYMOUR, FOR THE TIMES
If you want to stretch as an artist, it'll probably be easier if you have never achieved fame in a long-running sitcom. Jason Alexander may have been feeling this burden fromthe time he set out to direct "Just Looking." There have been--and doubtless will be--many moviegoers smirking at the very notion of "Seinfeld's" wormy sociopath George Costanza directing a feature film.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Judy Brennan, Judy Brennan is a regular contributor to Calendar
The lens is about to zoom in on Woody Allen's life. But this documentary undoubtedly will have nothing to do with angst or his sordid love life and everything to do with one of his greatest loves: music. Directed by documentary filmmaker Terry Zwigoff--whose last effort was the critically acclaimed biography of cartoonist Robert Crumb--the movie will follow Woody, his clarinet and his six-member New Orleans Funeral and Ragtime Orchestra as they "do Europe" at the end of February.
NEWS
December 25, 1998 | IRENE LACHER
'Tis the season for Santa's dark elf to come out of hiding and do one of the things he hates most--promote his own movies. Let's hear it for Sean Penn, one of the stars and a driving force behind two high-testosterone holiday releases, "Hurlyburly" and "The Thin Red Line." Earlier this week, Penn had the daunting task of back-to-back premieres, which he handled with Janus-like precision.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
In "Sweet and Lowdown," Woody Allen has found a droll and amusing way to combine his two favorite subjects: jazz music and himself, not necessarily in that order. While he often protests that he's thinking nothing of the kind, it's inevitable that films like "Husbands and Wives" and "Deconstructing Harry" come to be viewed within the context of Allen's own life, and their protagonists end up doing double duty as variant versions of himself.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Woody Allen has sued longtime friend and producer Jean Doumanian, accusing her of cheating him out of unspecified earnings from his last eight films. The comedic icon, who made his out-of-control neuroses a central character in many of the dozens of films he wrote and directed, contends that Doumanian and her production company have refused to give him regular and accurate revenue information.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
No one seeing "Everyone Says I Love You," Woody Allen's latest film, will wonder what's in it for him. What's in it for audiences is somewhat more problematical. The director's 26th film, "Everyone" features extensive location work in Paris and Venice and allows Allen, who stars as well as writes and directs, to play lush romantic scenes with Julia Roberts and Goldie Hawn. All very nice, no doubt, but not anything viewers can take a similar amount of pleasure in.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
When David Mamet directs, Ricky Jay is never far behind. The magician and sleight-of-hand artist has appeared in four of the playwright's five films, including his latest, "The Spanish Prisoner." More important than his work as an actor, however, is the way Jay's presence serves as a thematic touchstone for a director who enjoys making the same kind of gleefully duplicitous film over and over again.
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