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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was the only French film of the 1930s, Simone de Beauvoir reported, that she and Jean-Paul Sartre jointly admired, largely for "the fog of despair enveloping the entire film. " Yet it was banned by the Vichy government on moral grounds, accused of contributing to a national malaise that led to the German occupation and condemned by a French Catholic organization for telling "a profoundly demoralizing, somber story. " It's "Port of Shadows," one of the treasures of French cinema now newly restored to its original glory.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
French film star Jean Gabin played the Everyman every woman wanted. From the early 1930s until his death in 1976, the bulky, sexy and brooding Gabin was one of France's greatest movie heroes. Beloved internationally three decades after his death -- there's even a museum devoted to him outside Paris -- Gabin is still basically unknown in America save for a handful of classics including the 1937 gangster romance 'Pepe le Moko," Jean Renoir's 1937 antiwar drama "Grand Illusion" and Marcel Carne's poetic 1939 tragedy "Le Jour se leve.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Susan King
Tributes to a late actress and a writer/director are among the highlights of this weekend's films. The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre celebrates the 10th anniversary of the award-winning indie "Real Women Have Curves" on Thursday evening. Besides a cast and crew Q&A with screenwriter/playwright Josefina Lopez, director Patricia Cardoso, several of the actresses, producer Effie Brown and co-producer Marilyn R. Atlas, the evening will also pay tribute to one of the film's stars, the seminal Latina actress Lupe Ontiveros, who died in July at the age of 69. www.americancinematheque.com The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Oscars Outdoors summer screening series in Hollywood comes to conclusion Friday evening with a celebration of writer/director Nora Ephron, who died in June at the age of 71. Screening Friday is her last film, the 2009 hit comedy “Julie & Julia,” starring Meryl Streep -- in her Oscar-nominated performance as Julia Child -- and Amy Adams.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What was the special magic Jean Gabin wove that made him perhaps the greatest French film actor of the 20th century? As is true of most film stars, his power was undeniable and undefinable. The former song-and-dance man held the audience in his spell for 46 years and, nearly three decades after his death, no actor has been able to replace him in the hearts of his countrymen. French film critic Andre Bazin once described Gabin as "the tragic hero of contemporary cinema."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was the only French film of the 1930s, Simone de Beauvoir reported, that she and Jean-Paul Sartre jointly admired, largely for "the fog of despair enveloping the entire film. " Yet it was banned by the Vichy government on moral grounds, accused of contributing to a national malaise that led to the German occupation and condemned by a French Catholic organization for telling "a profoundly demoralizing, somber story. " It's "Port of Shadows," one of the treasures of French cinema now newly restored to its original glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010
The next month will see a welcome explosion of the films of the great humanist director Jean Renoir at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, timed to coincide with a tribute to his painter father. This Saturday features the frolicsome "French Cancan" while March 19 has the unforgettable "La Bête Humaine," starring Jean Gabin and Simone Simon. March 20 brings "The Southerner," with a guest appearance by one of the film's actors, Norman Lloyd. This is one filmmaker for whom there really is no modern equivalent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Mon Oncle d'Amerique." Embassy. $29.98. Alain Resnais' 1980 film bursts at the seams: It's a mixture of social comedy, political-philosophical critique, wistful cinematic poetry and romantic-triangle drama, all framed by a lecture on human animal instincts and conditioning by Prof. Henri Laborit. Resnais, as usual, fragments the action and plays ironically with time, but the film (scripted by Jean Gruault) is so lucid that it never leaves you adrift.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jean Delannoy, 100, a classic French filmmaker who adapted novels by Victor Hugo and Andre Gide and won the Cannes Film Festival's top prize in 1946, died Wednesday at his home in Guainville, southwest of Paris, the local city hall said, without providing the cause of death. Many of his films, starring actors including Jean Gabin, Jean Marais and Michele Morgan, were French box office successes in the 1940s and '50s. But Delannoy's classic style went out of fashion in the 1960s, when he was derided by the more avant-garde New Wave filmmakers, including Francois Truffaut.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The intrepid folks at Criterion have put out a fine pair of three-disc sets, each one celebrating a little-known but gifted foreign-language director who has a very particular place in film history. Perhaps most familiar to American audiences is the Samurai Trilogy of Japan's Hiroshi Inagaki, the 1950s trio starring Toshiro Mifune that began the West's enduring fascination with the samurai genre. Mifune plays a fictionalized version of the legendary 17th century swordsman Musashi Miyamoto as he takes the now-familiar journey from country bumpkin to wise killing machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010
The next month will see a welcome explosion of the films of the great humanist director Jean Renoir at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, timed to coincide with a tribute to his painter father. This Saturday features the frolicsome "French Cancan" while March 19 has the unforgettable "La Bête Humaine," starring Jean Gabin and Simone Simon. March 20 brings "The Southerner," with a guest appearance by one of the film's actors, Norman Lloyd. This is one filmmaker for whom there really is no modern equivalent.
OPINION
August 1, 2009 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author, most recently, of "You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story."
I was at LACMA three weeks ago and joined about a dozen people wandering grimly through an ugly, off-putting exhibition of contemporary Korean art. I understand the rationale for the show; Koreans are a significant minority in our community and are entitled to attention from our premiere art museum. After that, I joined about 300 others for a screening in the Bing Auditorium of "Pandora and the Flying Dutchman."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
French film star Jean Gabin played the Everyman every woman wanted. From the early 1930s until his death in 1976, the bulky, sexy and brooding Gabin was one of France's greatest movie heroes. Beloved internationally three decades after his death -- there's even a museum devoted to him outside Paris -- Gabin is still basically unknown in America save for a handful of classics including the 1937 gangster romance 'Pepe le Moko," Jean Renoir's 1937 antiwar drama "Grand Illusion" and Marcel Carne's poetic 1939 tragedy "Le Jour se leve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jean Delannoy, 100, a classic French filmmaker who adapted novels by Victor Hugo and Andre Gide and won the Cannes Film Festival's top prize in 1946, died Wednesday at his home in Guainville, southwest of Paris, the local city hall said, without providing the cause of death. Many of his films, starring actors including Jean Gabin, Jean Marais and Michele Morgan, were French box office successes in the 1940s and '50s. But Delannoy's classic style went out of fashion in the 1960s, when he was derided by the more avant-garde New Wave filmmakers, including Francois Truffaut.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The intrepid folks at Criterion have put out a fine pair of three-disc sets, each one celebrating a little-known but gifted foreign-language director who has a very particular place in film history. Perhaps most familiar to American audiences is the Samurai Trilogy of Japan's Hiroshi Inagaki, the 1950s trio starring Toshiro Mifune that began the West's enduring fascination with the samurai genre. Mifune plays a fictionalized version of the legendary 17th century swordsman Musashi Miyamoto as he takes the now-familiar journey from country bumpkin to wise killing machine.
OPINION
August 1, 2009 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author, most recently, of "You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story."
I was at LACMA three weeks ago and joined about a dozen people wandering grimly through an ugly, off-putting exhibition of contemporary Korean art. I understand the rationale for the show; Koreans are a significant minority in our community and are entitled to attention from our premiere art museum. After that, I joined about 300 others for a screening in the Bing Auditorium of "Pandora and the Flying Dutchman."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What was the special magic Jean Gabin wove that made him perhaps the greatest French film actor of the 20th century? As is true of most film stars, his power was undeniable and undefinable. The former song-and-dance man held the audience in his spell for 46 years and, nearly three decades after his death, no actor has been able to replace him in the hearts of his countrymen. French film critic Andre Bazin once described Gabin as "the tragic hero of contemporary cinema."
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