Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJean Gabin
IN THE NEWS

Jean Gabin

ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Susan King
Tributes to a late actress and a writer/director are among the highlights of this weekend's films. The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre celebrates the 10th anniversary of the award-winning indie "Real Women Have Curves" on Thursday evening. Besides a cast and crew Q&A with screenwriter/playwright Josefina Lopez, director Patricia Cardoso, several of the actresses, producer Effie Brown and co-producer Marilyn R. Atlas, the evening will also pay tribute to one of the film's stars, the seminal Latina actress Lupe Ontiveros, who died in July at the age of 69. www.americancinematheque.com The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Oscars Outdoors summer screening series in Hollywood comes to conclusion Friday evening with a celebration of writer/director Nora Ephron, who died in June at the age of 71. Screening Friday is her last film, the 2009 hit comedy “Julie & Julia,” starring Meryl Streep -- in her Oscar-nominated performance as Julia Child -- and Amy Adams.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers theater for the Times Orange County Edition. and
Much of the interest in "Loulou," Maurice Pialat's 1980 movie about hard-nosed romance, comes from watching French stars Gerard Depardieu and Isabelle Huppert at earlier, less commercial plateaus in their careers. Pialat, a former painter known for the earnest realism of his films, tells the story of Nelly (Huppert) and Loulou (Depardieu), a pair of lovers who connect despite the disadvantage of having little in common besides a flash point of sexual attraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2010
Extraordinary French film director Jean Renoir found the inspiration for one of his seminal early talkies, 1932's "Boudu Saved From Drowning," from an unlikely source -- the family pooch. "Boudu," which Paul Mazursky remade in 1986 as "Down and Out in Beverly Hills," revolves around an anarchic Parisian hobo who takes a suicidal leap into the Seine River but is saved by a well-heeled Parisian bookseller. The family takes in Boudu (played by one of Renoir's favorite actors, Michel Simon)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
Movies *** "Marked Woman." MGM/UA. $24.95. This grim Warner Bros. gangster melodrama, based on New York D.A. Tom Dewey's crackdown on Mafia vice lord Lucky Luciano--is regarded by some critics as a milestone of feminist cinema: a reputation that stems from the hard edge of Robert Rossen and Abem Finkel's script. Typically for Rossen, the hookers are portrayed as heroines, risking their lives to bring the gangster (Eduardo Ciannelli) to justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Franz." Kartes. $19.95. In the '70s, balladeer Jacques Brel had a fling as a movie star. His film work culminated in this genuine curiosity from 1972, for which Brel wrote scenario and score, starred and directed. Not surprisingly, Brel's role models seem to be the Jean Gabin of the '30s and Chaplin in a darker mode: He plays a lonely misfit, a psychologically scarred veteran of the Algerian War, who has a doomed romance in an ocean-side boarding house.
NEWS
April 1, 1989
Bernard Blier, the plump and balding French actor who incarnated hapless husbands, conniving cops and heartless hit men over a movie career that spanned 50 years, has died, his son announced Thursday in Paris. He was 73. Blier, winner of this year's prestigious Cesar award (France's equivalent of the Oscar) for a career that included roles in about 150 films, died in suburban Saint-Cloud after what was described only as a long illness.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|