Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJean Gump
IN THE NEWS

Jean Gump

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
Those somber, restless days, Joe Gump thought often about the man who came running to Jesus. He had always obeyed the Commandments and now he wanted to know if that was enough for eternal life. No, there is something else, Jesus told him: Sell all you have, take up your cross and follow me. And this had made the man go away grieved, for he had many possessions. So did Joe Gump, actually. He was not rich. But he did have a fine home in the Chicago suburbs and the worldly clutter of 59 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1989
Last December, The Times ran a three-part series on Jean Gump, peace activist. An update on this Morton Grove, Ill., mother of 12 and grandmother now serving time in women's federal prison is her sentence of 60 days in solitary. Jean Gump, "prisoner of conscience," has served 2 1/2 years of her 6-year sentence for her civil disobedience in an anti-nuclear missile peace protest. Her recent crime that brought her the harsh isolation confinement punishment was her refusal to take a drug test in front of guards.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
An OZ light flashed at Launch Control, which in itself was not so scary. Sensors detect anything that pierces the Outer Zone around a missile silo, and that could mean birds, rabbits or a trickle of water. But then the IZ light blinked on, too. What the heck is that? Someone was tampering with the access hatch to an American nuclear weapon. There are just two officers down in Control, 70 feet underground, living in a capsule the size of a school bus.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
Those somber, restless days, Joe Gump thought often about the man who came running to Jesus. He had always obeyed the Commandments and now he wanted to know if that was enough for eternal life. No, there is something else, Jesus told him: Sell all you have, take up your cross and follow me. And this had made the man go away grieved, for he had many possessions. So did Joe Gump, actually. He was not rich. But he did have a fine home in the Chicago suburbs and the worldly clutter of 59 years.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
Jean Gump commemorated the Crucifixion of Christ atop a missile silo near Holden, Mo., in the vast prairies that are America's nuclear heartland. It was Good Friday, which also seemed to her a good day to die. She half expected helicopters to plunge from the sky, the crew mistaking a dowdy suburban grandmother for an Arab terrorist. The gods of metal again would have defied the God of Moses who long ago said: Thou shalt not kill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1989
Last December, The Times ran a three-part series on Jean Gump, peace activist. An update on this Morton Grove, Ill., mother of 12 and grandmother now serving time in women's federal prison is her sentence of 60 days in solitary. Jean Gump, "prisoner of conscience," has served 2 1/2 years of her 6-year sentence for her civil disobedience in an anti-nuclear missile peace protest. Her recent crime that brought her the harsh isolation confinement punishment was her refusal to take a drug test in front of guards.
NEWS
December 12, 1988
Jean Gump--maybe she is the only sane one of us all, considering the consequences of ignoring the problem. ELEANOR R. BLURTON Fountain Valley
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1988
Eighty billion dollars! That's hard for me to visualize. I have trouble with any amount over $1 million. Eighty billion dollars for nuclear weapons we don't need ("Nuclear Weapon Plants Held to Need $80 Billion," Part I, Dec. 12). We already have all it takes to blow up the world and pollute the atmosphere. Still, I think $80 billion would make a big dent in housing for the homeless and food for the hungry. We speak of peace on earth and prepare to blow it up. Doesn't somebody care enough to do something about it?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1988
My journey from '60s protests to '80s schoolteacher had, I thought, given me a comprehensive perspective of America's direction and purpose. However, your Dec. 4 issue presented a strange regression, which shook my sensibilities while reaffirming my commitment to social conscience. A 58-year-old grandmother was sentenced to 12 years for acting out her disgust with the "them versus us" Pentagon mentality. A contrasting Calendar story and review of Gun N' Roses' latest contribution to decadence, a song titled, "One in a Million," was described as fascinating by your reviewer and funny by bassist Doug McKagan.
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
An OZ light flashed at Launch Control, which in itself was not so scary. Sensors detect anything that pierces the Outer Zone around a missile silo, and that could mean birds, rabbits or a trickle of water. But then the IZ light blinked on, too. What the heck is that? Someone was tampering with the access hatch to an American nuclear weapon. There are just two officers down in Control, 70 feet underground, living in a capsule the size of a school bus.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
Jean Gump commemorated the Crucifixion of Christ atop a missile silo near Holden, Mo., in the vast prairies that are America's nuclear heartland. It was Good Friday, which also seemed to her a good day to die. She half expected helicopters to plunge from the sky, the crew mistaking a dowdy suburban grandmother for an Arab terrorist. The gods of metal again would have defied the God of Moses who long ago said: Thou shalt not kill.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | PAIGE St. JOHN, Associated Press
Colonial cottages on spacious grounds and lovely scenery greeted Liz when she arrived in West Virginia. A matronly woman held out her arms and said: "Come on in, sweetie." Come on in, that was, to serve your 30-year sentence in the place to be if you're in that kind of a jam. For this was Liz's welcome to the Federal Correctional Institute at Alderson, the federal government's only all-women's prison.
BOOKS
November 23, 1997 | STUDS TERKEL
Editor's Note: On Nov. 18, Studs Terkel was awarded the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He delivered the following remarks: * There is more than a touch of irony to this pleasant occasion. I am, after a fashion, being celebrated for having celebrated the lives of the uncelebrated; for lending voice to the face in the crowd. This, I imagine, is what much of oral history is about.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|