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Jean Harlow

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Probably the most iconic Jean Harlow moment comes at the end of the 1933 classic MGM comedy-drama "Dinner at Eight," when Kitty, Harlow's uber-sexy dumb blond wife of a self-made tycoon, is talking to Carlotta, a high-society woman played by Marie Dressler. Kitty: "I was reading a book the other day. " Carlotta (dumbstruck): "Reading a book?" Kitty: "Yes. It's all about civilization or something. A nutty kind of book. Do you know that the guy says that machinery is going to take the place of every profession?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Susan King
Stars had faces in the golden age of Hollywood. And for many years, photographer George Hurrell, the father of the Hollywood glamour portrait, captured their allure, glamour and indefinable charisma. Known as the "Rembrandt of Hollywood," the groundbreaking photographer is the subject of "George Hurrell's Hollywood: Glamour Portraits 1925-1992," a biographical coffee-table book by writer-photographer Mark A. Vieira, who knew Hurrell for more than 15 years. Using interviews, archival documents and 20 years' worth of his own diaries, Vieira creates a portrait of a brilliant, complicated artist who had a great working relationship with the stars and a mercurial personality with studio chiefs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2011 | Kenneth Turan, Film Critic
"I want to be gay, I want to be free," the stunning young woman says, vivacious, casually amoral, all but blistering the screen. "Life is short and I want to live it while I'm alive. " The actress is Jean Harlow, and the bitter irony is that she lived only eight years past that moment of dialogue in Howard Hughes' legendary "Hell's Angels," dying of kidney failure at age 26 in 1937. Yet in that short span of time Hollywood's original platinum blond created an impressive body of work that is shockingly little seen today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Susan King
“Blue moon, You saw me standing alone Without a dream in my heart Without a love of my own” The Lorenz Hart-Richard Rodgers romantic standard “Blue Moon” plays a significant role in Woody Allen's new drama “Blue Jasmine.” It is “the song” of the emotionally shattered former socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) and her late husband, the Bernie Madoff-esque Hal (Alec Baldwin). As Jasmine further descends into disillusion and madness, the song becomes her refuge from reality.
BOOKS
December 16, 1990 | Karen Stabiner
DEADLY ILLUSIONS: Jean Harlow and the Murder of Paul Bern by Samuel Marx and Joyce Vanderveen (Random House: $19.95; 271 pp.) When Paul Bern, producer and husband of sexpot actress Jean Harlow, was found dead, the story of how he died threatened the movie she then was working on ("Red Dust," in which she played opposite one of MGM's brightest leading men, Clark Gable). And so, according to Marx and Vanderveen's persuasive book, Louis B.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Susan King
Stars had faces in the golden age of Hollywood. And for many years, photographer George Hurrell, the father of the Hollywood glamour portrait, captured their allure, glamour and indefinable charisma. Known as the "Rembrandt of Hollywood," the groundbreaking photographer is the subject of "George Hurrell's Hollywood: Glamour Portraits 1925-1992," a biographical coffee-table book by writer-photographer Mark A. Vieira, who knew Hurrell for more than 15 years. Using interviews, archival documents and 20 years' worth of his own diaries, Vieira creates a portrait of a brilliant, complicated artist who had a great working relationship with the stars and a mercurial personality with studio chiefs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Susan King
“Blue moon, You saw me standing alone Without a dream in my heart Without a love of my own” The Lorenz Hart-Richard Rodgers romantic standard “Blue Moon” plays a significant role in Woody Allen's new drama “Blue Jasmine.” It is “the song” of the emotionally shattered former socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) and her late husband, the Bernie Madoff-esque Hal (Alec Baldwin). As Jasmine further descends into disillusion and madness, the song becomes her refuge from reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff writer
Humphrey Bogart, Lon Chaney, Fred Astaire and other superstars are on display in the latest batch of oldies-but-goodies recently released on DVD. Bogart was considered one of the biggest stars of the 20th century; four of his films from Warner Home Video ($20 each) -- "They Live by Night," "High Sierra," "To Have and Have Not" and "Dark Passage" -- illustrate why.
MAGAZINE
July 13, 2003 | Harry Bekkar, Harry Bekkar is a writer living in San Clemente. A version of this essay first appeared in his "print on demand" book, "Optimizing Health and Longevity" (November 2001).
My social life picked up nicely in 1936, when, as a senior at Hollywood High, I drove a '34 Ford convertible with a rumble seat. My part-time job at the Coast Ice Cream Parlor on Sunset Boulevard provided enough cash for dates to movies or dancing to swing bands at the Palomar Ballroom. But there was one night that was utterly different. It began after an evening meeting of a school service club, Hi-Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2011 | Kenneth Turan, Film Critic
"I want to be gay, I want to be free," the stunning young woman says, vivacious, casually amoral, all but blistering the screen. "Life is short and I want to live it while I'm alive. " The actress is Jean Harlow, and the bitter irony is that she lived only eight years past that moment of dialogue in Howard Hughes' legendary "Hell's Angels," dying of kidney failure at age 26 in 1937. Yet in that short span of time Hollywood's original platinum blond created an impressive body of work that is shockingly little seen today.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Probably the most iconic Jean Harlow moment comes at the end of the 1933 classic MGM comedy-drama "Dinner at Eight," when Kitty, Harlow's uber-sexy dumb blond wife of a self-made tycoon, is talking to Carlotta, a high-society woman played by Marie Dressler. Kitty: "I was reading a book the other day. " Carlotta (dumbstruck): "Reading a book?" Kitty: "Yes. It's all about civilization or something. A nutty kind of book. Do you know that the guy says that machinery is going to take the place of every profession?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2007 | Angie Green, Times Staff Writer
At the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue in Hollywood, tourists are drawn to the Kodak Theatre and Grauman's Chinese Theatre. But off the beaten track is one of the few historic buildings left in an area full of high-rises and strip malls. The former Hollywood School for Girls, which opened in 1908 and educated famous Hollywood actresses, still stands near the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and North La Brea Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff writer
Humphrey Bogart, Lon Chaney, Fred Astaire and other superstars are on display in the latest batch of oldies-but-goodies recently released on DVD. Bogart was considered one of the biggest stars of the 20th century; four of his films from Warner Home Video ($20 each) -- "They Live by Night," "High Sierra," "To Have and Have Not" and "Dark Passage" -- illustrate why.
MAGAZINE
July 13, 2003 | Harry Bekkar, Harry Bekkar is a writer living in San Clemente. A version of this essay first appeared in his "print on demand" book, "Optimizing Health and Longevity" (November 2001).
My social life picked up nicely in 1936, when, as a senior at Hollywood High, I drove a '34 Ford convertible with a rumble seat. My part-time job at the Coast Ice Cream Parlor on Sunset Boulevard provided enough cash for dates to movies or dancing to swing bands at the Palomar Ballroom. But there was one night that was utterly different. It began after an evening meeting of a school service club, Hi-Y.
BOOKS
December 16, 1990 | Karen Stabiner
DEADLY ILLUSIONS: Jean Harlow and the Murder of Paul Bern by Samuel Marx and Joyce Vanderveen (Random House: $19.95; 271 pp.) When Paul Bern, producer and husband of sexpot actress Jean Harlow, was found dead, the story of how he died threatened the movie she then was working on ("Red Dust," in which she played opposite one of MGM's brightest leading men, Clark Gable). And so, according to Marx and Vanderveen's persuasive book, Louis B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2007 | Angie Green, Times Staff Writer
At the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue in Hollywood, tourists are drawn to the Kodak Theatre and Grauman's Chinese Theatre. But off the beaten track is one of the few historic buildings left in an area full of high-rises and strip malls. The former Hollywood School for Girls, which opened in 1908 and educated famous Hollywood actresses, still stands near the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and North La Brea Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1992 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
The city is sprinkled with sites of the untimely deaths of the famous and the fated. From John Belushi to the Black Dahlia, Los Angeles has been the backdrop for many a notorious demise. Solved or unsolved, some murders and suicides become part of the cultural fabric, spawning books, movies and even sightseeing tours. Here is a look at episodes from the city's homicidal history. 1.
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