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Jean Jacques Annaud

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October 16, 1997 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There must be easier ways to make a movie about spiritual awakening. In bringing "Seven Years in Tibet" to the screen, French director Jean-Jacques Annaud and his staff spent six months and about $1 million researching Tibet and scouting locations, only to have the Chinese government, unhappy that the film is critical of its occupation of Tibet, apply muscle to the government of India to prevent him from shooting there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Jonathan Landreth
SHANGHAI - Fifteen years ago, Jean-Jacques Annaud was demonized by the Chinese Communist Party for his film “Seven Years in Tibet” - the cadres were unhappy with his cinematic portrayal of the People's Liberation Army's invasion of the region in 1949 and his casting of the sister of the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama. A decade and a half on, the 68-year-old French director is being welcomed here with open arms. On Saturday, Annaud will arrive in China to chair the jury of the 15th Shanghai International Film Festival, which kicks off this weekend with 17 films from around the world in competition.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Tigers burn brightly in "Two Brothers." Their names are alone above the title, they have all the good scenes, they are a wonder to behold. There is a price that must be paid to experience their grandeur, but if you are a tiger fan, or think you might be, it will be worth it. "Two Brothers" was directed by France's Jean-Jacques Annaud, likely the only filmmaker who could have done it, and if you're familiar with his previous work you can accurately guess this venture's strengths and weaknesses.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Tigers burn brightly in "Two Brothers." Their names are alone above the title, they have all the good scenes, they are a wonder to behold. There is a price that must be paid to experience their grandeur, but if you are a tiger fan, or think you might be, it will be worth it. "Two Brothers" was directed by France's Jean-Jacques Annaud, likely the only filmmaker who could have done it, and if you're familiar with his previous work you can accurately guess this venture's strengths and weaknesses.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2004 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
The tiger cub stops dead in his tracks, his whole body tensing with alertness. He's heard an unfamiliar rustling in his jungle habitat, and we see his reaction tightly framed: his striking blue eyes convey surprise and curiosity but also fear. Swiftly he turns and scampers back to a safe haven, a place he knows his mother will be. It's a dramatic, rich little scene -- and it has been caught in its entirety by film cameras.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1992 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After playing to packed houses in Europe and Asia for seven months, much of the news surrounding Jean-Jacques Annaud's "The Lover" on this continent prior to its limited national release today has focused on how realistic its sex scenes appear. Annaud, however, would rather talk about making the movie in Vietnam, the first Western production ever shot there. "The Lover," he said, mimicking a Hollywood pitch line, is the story of "a girl, the man--and Asia."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1985 | RODERICK MANN
Red noses, watery eyes and freezing hands--that's what French director Jean Jacques Annaud is promising the Hollywood actors he's lining up for the film version of the prize-winning best seller, "The Name of the Rose." That's because the movie, about murders in a 14th-Century European abbey, will be filmed in the cells and courtyards of bone-chilling German and Italian monasteries this winter. And Annaud wants it to look freezing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1986 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Leaving a Venice eatery the other afternoon, Jean-Jacques Annaud stopped to eye a row of crispy bronze ducks turning on a spit near the kitchen. "Perhaps we have some heretics here," Annaud said mischievously, Few but Annaud would make such an unusual association. For the last four years the 42-year-old French director has been immersed in the strange mores of the Middle Ages, which are the focus of his latest movie, "The Name of the Rose."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
A breath of frosty morning air gently sweeps through the valley, rustling brittle autumn leaves and sending a flurry tumbling down the mountainside in an orange, yellow and red waterfall. They settle at the base of a mountain, not far from a log cabin that was hand-framed by Mormon pioneers in 1879. Doug and Lynne Seus are relaxing inside the restored cabin as their son Clint Youngreen prepares a fire in a blackened pot-belly stove.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Jonathan Landreth
SHANGHAI - Fifteen years ago, Jean-Jacques Annaud was demonized by the Chinese Communist Party for his film “Seven Years in Tibet” - the cadres were unhappy with his cinematic portrayal of the People's Liberation Army's invasion of the region in 1949 and his casting of the sister of the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama. A decade and a half on, the 68-year-old French director is being welcomed here with open arms. On Saturday, Annaud will arrive in China to chair the jury of the 15th Shanghai International Film Festival, which kicks off this weekend with 17 films from around the world in competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2004 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
The tiger cub stops dead in his tracks, his whole body tensing with alertness. He's heard an unfamiliar rustling in his jungle habitat, and we see his reaction tightly framed: his striking blue eyes convey surprise and curiosity but also fear. Swiftly he turns and scampers back to a safe haven, a place he knows his mother will be. It's a dramatic, rich little scene -- and it has been caught in its entirety by film cameras.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1997 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There must be easier ways to make a movie about spiritual awakening. In bringing "Seven Years in Tibet" to the screen, French director Jean-Jacques Annaud and his staff spent six months and about $1 million researching Tibet and scouting locations, only to have the Chinese government, unhappy that the film is critical of its occupation of Tibet, apply muscle to the government of India to prevent him from shooting there.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"The Lover" is easy to watch and even easier to forget. A pleasant enough piece of commercial sensuality from French director Jean-Jacques Annaud, its selling point is its very pretty, clothing-optional sex scenes. Their effectiveness, however, is undercut by an air of self-congratulatory pomposity that the film is way too insubstantial to support. In this art-house erotica mixing of simulated love making with strained seriousness, "The Lover" (at the Park) follows a path of proven success.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1992 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After playing to packed houses in Europe and Asia for seven months, much of the news surrounding Jean-Jacques Annaud's "The Lover" on this continent prior to its limited national release today has focused on how realistic its sex scenes appear. Annaud, however, would rather talk about making the movie in Vietnam, the first Western production ever shot there. "The Lover," he said, mimicking a Hollywood pitch line, is the story of "a girl, the man--and Asia."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
A breath of frosty morning air gently sweeps through the valley, rustling brittle autumn leaves and sending a flurry tumbling down the mountainside in an orange, yellow and red waterfall. They settle at the base of a mountain, not far from a log cabin that was hand-framed by Mormon pioneers in 1879. Doug and Lynne Seus are relaxing inside the restored cabin as their son Clint Youngreen prepares a fire in a blackened pot-belly stove.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1986 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Leaving a Venice eatery the other afternoon, Jean-Jacques Annaud stopped to eye a row of crispy bronze ducks turning on a spit near the kitchen. "Perhaps we have some heretics here," Annaud said mischievously, Few but Annaud would make such an unusual association. For the last four years the 42-year-old French director has been immersed in the strange mores of the Middle Ages, which are the focus of his latest movie, "The Name of the Rose."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"The Lover" is easy to watch and even easier to forget. A pleasant enough piece of commercial sensuality from French director Jean-Jacques Annaud, its selling point is its very pretty, clothing-optional sex scenes. Their effectiveness, however, is undercut by an air of self-congratulatory pomposity that the film is way too insubstantial to support. In this art-house erotica mixing of simulated love making with strained seriousness, "The Lover" (at the Park) follows a path of proven success.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Compromise Reached: The French film academy found a compromise Thursday over a disputed decision to bar foreign-language films from its annual Cesar awards. The Academy of Cinematic Arts and Technology decided that only the best film award would be restricted to French-language productions. The other Cesars--French equivalents of the Oscars--would be open to any film made with French money or expertise.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1985 | RODERICK MANN
Red noses, watery eyes and freezing hands--that's what French director Jean Jacques Annaud is promising the Hollywood actors he's lining up for the film version of the prize-winning best seller, "The Name of the Rose." That's because the movie, about murders in a 14th-Century European abbey, will be filmed in the cells and courtyards of bone-chilling German and Italian monasteries this winter. And Annaud wants it to look freezing.
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