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Jean Jacques Beineix

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November 7, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Does an artist ever recognize his muse? And if he does, can he live with her, love her, forgive her for having more faith in his work than he's ever had? That's one of the cries from the heart of "Betty Blue" (Royal Theater), the third and most astonishing of the films of Jean-Jacques Beineix, which combines the technique and control of "Diva," his celebrated first film, with a passion that is all its own. Betty Blue is a pretty unlikely muse, a free spirit open to almost any adventure.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2009 | Susan King
In terms of respect, French director Jean-Jacques Beineix is sort of the Rodney Dangerfield of filmmaking in his country. When his first film, 1981's "Diva," opened in France, the critics gave it a resounding thumbs down. But word-of-mouth built for the quirky story of a postman and opera buff who ends up recording his singing idol. "Diva" became a huge hit not only in France but also internationally.
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OPINION
February 6, 1994 | Scott Kraft, Scott Kraft, Paris bureau chief for The Times, interviewed Jean-Jacques Beineix in the Paris offices of Cargo Films, the director's production company
The first feature film Jean-Jacques Beineix directed was the kind no Hollywood studio would have made. It had a paltry $1 million budget. No name stars. Everyone speaking a foreign language. And, of course, a first-time director at the helm. Yet, his 1981 thriller, "Diva," became a critical and commercial success in the United States, where it is still among the 10 most-successful foreign films. Beineix was hailed as a genius and compared to Orson Welles.
OPINION
February 6, 1994 | Scott Kraft, Scott Kraft, Paris bureau chief for The Times, interviewed Jean-Jacques Beineix in the Paris offices of Cargo Films, the director's production company
The first feature film Jean-Jacques Beineix directed was the kind no Hollywood studio would have made. It had a paltry $1 million budget. No name stars. Everyone speaking a foreign language. And, of course, a first-time director at the helm. Yet, his 1981 thriller, "Diva," became a critical and commercial success in the United States, where it is still among the 10 most-successful foreign films. Beineix was hailed as a genius and compared to Orson Welles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2009 | Susan King
In terms of respect, French director Jean-Jacques Beineix is sort of the Rodney Dangerfield of filmmaking in his country. When his first film, 1981's "Diva," opened in France, the critics gave it a resounding thumbs down. But word-of-mouth built for the quirky story of a postman and opera buff who ends up recording his singing idol. "Diva" became a huge hit not only in France but also internationally.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON
1--"Hannah and Her Sisters" (U.S., Woody Allen). 2--"Blue Velvet" (U.S., David Lynch). 3--" 'Round Midnight" (U.S., Bertrand Tavernier). 4--"Platoon" (U.S., Oliver Stone). 5--"Room With a View" (England, James Ivory). 6--"Mona Lisa" (England, Neil Jordan). 7--"Betty Blue" (France, Jean-Jacques Beineix). 8--"My Beautiful Laundrette" (England, Stephen Frears). 9--"Stand By Me" (U.S., Rob Reiner). 10--"Vagabond" (France, Agnes Varda).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A censorship dispute may force the withdrawal of five of 160 films due to be screened at Istanbul's seventh annual film festival next week, organizers said Sunday in the Turkish city. Jean-Jacques Beineix's "Betty Blue" and "Yakaris" by Soviet director Tengiz Abuladze are among five works that government inspectors want to cut or block, they said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1986 | Associated Press
The French film "Betty Blues" by director Jean-Jacques Beineix, who made the hit thriller "Diva," has won the Grand Prize at the 10th annual Montreal World Film Festival. The movie's star, actor Jean-Hughes Anglade, accepted the award at closing ceremonies Monday night. The film's French title is "37.2 Le Matin," which means 37.2 degrees (normal body temperature on the Celsius scale) in the morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2007 | Susan King
Just as the French have given Jerry Lewis more respect as a filmmaker than Hollywood, it was American audiences that turned French director Jean-Jacques Beineix's quirky caper flick "Diva" into a hit 25 years ago. "America saved my film," says the 61-year-old Beineix. "People [at home] said that this movie was just glossy and had no significance, no scenario, and it was all surface and no brain. When the film was released in France [in 1981], it was a total flop."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
It's understandable why Jean-Claude Lauzon's "Night Zoo" (at the AMC Century 14) has become the most honored Canadian film in years, perhaps ever. It has passion, energy and flash, not qualities we usually associate with the generally sedate Canadian cinema. It is far from flawless but is venturesome and entertaining, marking an exciting feature debut for Lauzon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Does an artist ever recognize his muse? And if he does, can he live with her, love her, forgive her for having more faith in his work than he's ever had? That's one of the cries from the heart of "Betty Blue" (Royal Theater), the third and most astonishing of the films of Jean-Jacques Beineix, which combines the technique and control of "Diva," his celebrated first film, with a passion that is all its own. Betty Blue is a pretty unlikely muse, a free spirit open to almost any adventure.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Jean-Jacques Beineix's "Diva," which opens a 25th-anniversary run today at the Nuart, remains a dazzler, as fresh as tomorrow. Made with wit and humor, this French stunner abounds in the go-for-broke spirit of a first film made by a talented, nervy director -- Beineix had spent a decade as an assistant director, working for everyone from the veteran Rene Clement to Jerry Lewis (on the legendary never-released Holocaust movie "The Day the Clown Cried").
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
The Festival of New Quebec Films, with 11 pictures, runs Friday through Nov. 12 at the Monica 4-Plex. In the Canadian cinema the language barrier acts as a protection for its French-speaking film industry; its English-speaking film makers are constantly faced with the competition of American films and with being coopted on their own ground by U.S. productions.
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