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Jean Lafitte National Historical Park

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NEWS
February 11, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Ranger Bruce Barnes shined his spotlight over the black waters of the bayou from his canoe. Everywhere he moved the light, he picked up glowing red eyes of alligators. He imitated the sound of an alligator's bark. A pair of red eyes headed in his direction. As Barnes, 26, led the monthly, three-hour, full-moon canoe trip in the Barataria unit of Jean Lafitte Park, 18 miles south of New Orleans, owls hooted. Coyotes howled. Fish jumped out of the water. Ten different species of frogs croaked.
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NEWS
February 11, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Ranger Bruce Barnes shined his spotlight over the black waters of the bayou from his canoe. Everywhere he moved the light, he picked up glowing red eyes of alligators. He imitated the sound of an alligator's bark. A pair of red eyes headed in his direction. As Barnes, 26, led the monthly, three-hour, full-moon canoe trip in the Barataria unit of Jean Lafitte Park, 18 miles south of New Orleans, owls hooted. Coyotes howled. Fish jumped out of the water. Ten different species of frogs croaked.
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NEWS
January 4, 1996 | Reuters
A reenactment of the 1815 Battle of New Orleans that sent the British running down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico fell victim to a bloodless skirmish Wednesday: the federal budget battle. The annual celebration of Andrew Jackson's defeat of British troops, commemorated since 1894, became the latest casualty of the budget war because of lack of government funding for national parks. "It's a sad day for us, and it affects a lot of people.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | JOHN LAIDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he answered the phone in his furniture store the other day, Leo Daigle Jr. began speaking English to a customer. Moments later, the phone rang again. This time, he spoke French. Like many of the residents of this small town and others along the St. John's River valley bordering the Canadian province of New Brunswick, Daigle is used to alternating between French and English--sometimes in mid-sentence.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Red X's scrawled with lipstick, crayons and red bricks cover the Greek revival tomb of Marie Laveau, New Orleans' most widely known voodoo queen who died in 1897. The red X's are always there. They're voodoo wishes. They're also only a part of the voodoo mystique--including coins, flowers, candles, an unopened can of beer and a decapitated chicken--that visitors leave at Laveau's last resting place, the Wishing Tomb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2008 | Patricia Sullivan, Washington Post
Irvan J. Perez, whose haunting a cappella songs in the disappearing Islenos language told tales of fishing, trapping and life in the swamps of southern Louisiana, died after a heart attack Jan. 8 at Tulane University Medical Center in New Orleans. He was 85. Perez, a 1991 winner of the National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship, sang decimas, distinctive narrative songs in 10-line stanzas.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2010 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The sickening images of pelicans struggling in oil along Louisiana's barrier islands only hint at what's at stake if the slick forces its way into the state's 3 ½ million acres of estuaries and marshes. These bays and bayous are thrumming with life — they are far more biologically diverse than the Everglades — and serve as nursery and breeding ground for the gulf's world famous shrimp, crab, oyster and fish. The wetlands system that fringes the coast is often called "Liquid Louisiana."
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