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Jean Louis Palladin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean-Louis Palladin, the consummate chef's chef who modernized and enhanced French cooking in America and influenced a generation of foodies with innovative combinations of the freshest ingredients at his restaurant, Jean-Louis at the Watergate, has died. He was 55. Palladin died Sunday in McLean, Va., of lung cancer, a family spokeswoman said. The chef, a heavy smoker, was diagnosed with the disease late last year.
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FOOD
November 28, 2001 | PHYLLIS RICHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Allo." The gravelly voice had an immutable French accent. "Jean-Louis here." That was the telephone greeting of America's first world-class French chef, when one measures those things by Michelin stars. The inspiration of many great chefs cooking today, Jean-Louis Palladin, who died Sunday, needed no last name. Like Julia or Cher. And truth be told, if Jean-Louis Palladin had been born a woman, he would have been some combination of those two.
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FOOD
December 17, 1989 | BARBARA HANSEN
Recently, I saw two people huddled over Jean-Louis Palladin's book. They were not cooks but photographers admiring the work of Fred J. Maroon, who photographed Palladin's dishes as if they were works of art or architecture. Palladin is the highly regarded chef of Jean-Louis at Watergate in Washington. There is no quarreling with the caliber of his work, but in this book, the challenges that faced Maroon are almost more interesting. Instead of plates and platters, the food was often placed on acrylic surfaces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean-Louis Palladin, the consummate chef's chef who modernized and enhanced French cooking in America and influenced a generation of foodies with innovative combinations of the freshest ingredients at his restaurant, Jean-Louis at the Watergate, has died. He was 55. Palladin died Sunday in McLean, Va., of lung cancer, a family spokeswoman said. The chef, a heavy smoker, was diagnosed with the disease late last year.
FOOD
May 6, 1993
Larry Forgione of New York's An American Place and Jean-Louis Palladin of Washington's Jean-Louis at the Watergate shared top honors at the third James Beard Awards presentation Monday night. Forgione and Palladin finished in a dead heat for chef of the year. Restaurant of the year was Inn at Little Washington, in Washington, Va.
FOOD
November 28, 2001 | PHYLLIS RICHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Allo." The gravelly voice had an immutable French accent. "Jean-Louis here." That was the telephone greeting of America's first world-class French chef, when one measures those things by Michelin stars. The inspiration of many great chefs cooking today, Jean-Louis Palladin, who died Sunday, needed no last name. Like Julia or Cher. And truth be told, if Jean-Louis Palladin had been born a woman, he would have been some combination of those two.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1986 | RUTH REICHL
Every traveling chef knows that he will be attacked by jet lag, discouraged by unavailable ingredients, irritated by forgotten objects and depressed by unfamiliar kitchens. And yet, despite all this, the great chefs of America are constantly trotting about the countryside with their pots and their pans. Why do they do it?
FOOD
December 5, 1991 | KATHIE JENKINS
Jamison Farm 171 Jamison Lane Latrobe, Pa. 15650-9419 (800) 237-LAMB Brochure Available MasterCard, Visa Ever wonder why the lamb you're served in good restaurants tastes so different from what you serve at home? The answer is age. John and Sukey Jamison's naturally raised lamb is sold when it's still tiny and tender. The result is expensive, buttery baby lamb that's mild in flavor and quite unlike the older lamb found in most markets.
FOOD
November 19, 2000
It seems every time Julia Child turns around, she's being honored for something or the other. But this time is special. A cast of all-star chefs will cook at a fund-raiser for the Cal Poly Pomona hospitality program in Child's honor Dec. 2. They'll include Mark Peel and Nancy Silverton from Campanile, Michel Richard and Roberto Donna from Washington, D.C., George Morrone, Roland Passot and Michael Mina from the Bay Area, and Jean-Louis Palladin and Drew Nieporent from New York.
MAGAZINE
November 13, 1988 | RUTH REICHL
YOU KNOW how hard it is to cook while you're turning the pages of a book. The instruction you need is on the next page, but your hands are covered with eggs and flour and you can't figure out how to get there without spoiling the book. The perfect solution, of course, is to hang the recipe on the wall. Unfortunately, too few recipes come ready to frame. The fact that the "Great Chefs of America Calendar" has recipes ready for hanging is only a part of the beauty.
FOOD
May 6, 1993
Larry Forgione of New York's An American Place and Jean-Louis Palladin of Washington's Jean-Louis at the Watergate shared top honors at the third James Beard Awards presentation Monday night. Forgione and Palladin finished in a dead heat for chef of the year. Restaurant of the year was Inn at Little Washington, in Washington, Va.
FOOD
December 17, 1989 | BARBARA HANSEN
Recently, I saw two people huddled over Jean-Louis Palladin's book. They were not cooks but photographers admiring the work of Fred J. Maroon, who photographed Palladin's dishes as if they were works of art or architecture. Palladin is the highly regarded chef of Jean-Louis at Watergate in Washington. There is no quarreling with the caliber of his work, but in this book, the challenges that faced Maroon are almost more interesting. Instead of plates and platters, the food was often placed on acrylic surfaces.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1986 | RUTH REICHL
Every traveling chef knows that he will be attacked by jet lag, discouraged by unavailable ingredients, irritated by forgotten objects and depressed by unfamiliar kitchens. And yet, despite all this, the great chefs of America are constantly trotting about the countryside with their pots and their pans. Why do they do it?
FOOD
February 11, 1993 | RUTH REICHL
"He stole half my truffles!" said Michel Blanchet, pointing an accusing knife at Daniel Boulud. "He needed them!" said Jean-Louis Palladin. "Did you see his recipe for rillettes ? It's half pork and half truffles. Of course he didn't have enough." Gilbert Le Coze picked up one of the black nuggets, sniffed it luxuriously and smiled. "Did you taste the rillettes ?" he asked. "Wonderful!" "Only the best for Julia," said Boulud.
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