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Jean Louis Trintignant

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the 1994 Cannes Film Festival, fans of Krzysztof Kieslowski found their hearts lifted. And then broken. The Polish master was on the Riviera with the magnificent "Red," the final panel in his "Three Colors" triptych and a film widely expected to receive the Palme d'Or, even by Quentin Tarantino, whose "Pulp Fiction" took the honors instead. But for devotees it wasn't the disappointment of laurels denied that was hard to bear; it was Kieslowski's announcement that he was retiring from filmmaking.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It won the Palme d'Or at Cannes. It accomplished an unprecedented sweep of the European Film Awards, taking best picture, director, actor and actress. The Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. thinks it's the best picture of the year, and so do I. What is it about Michael Haneke's "Amour" that inspires this level of fervor and respect, given that it's basically a two-character drama set almost exclusively in an unassuming Paris apartment? The answer is that "Amour" is a perfect storm of a motion picture, with an icy, immaculate director unexpectedly taking on deeply emotional subject matter: what happens to a lifelong, harmonious marriage when the wife suffers a series of debilitating strokes that changes the couple's life beyond recognition.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Although its imperturbable director insists that it realizes only 35% of his intentions (as opposed to 30% for the rest of his films), Krzysztof Kieslowski's "Three Colors: Red" looks to be the surest bet to win at least one Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival, if not for film or director then at least for best actor for French veteran Jean-Louis Trintignant.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter
PARIS - Up four old, crooked flights of stairs in her apartment building with no elevator, Emmanuelle Riva sits wrapped in a thick, woven, poncho-like sweater. Warm light streams through colorful windowpanes into her narrow living room, where Riva lives alone, and she's just turned off a pot of boiling water for tea. More than half a century ago, she exploded onto the screen with her mesmerizing interpretation of a modern beauty haunted by love and war in the classic "Hiroshima Mon Amour.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1992 | BARBARA ISENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is Jean-Louis Trintignant, star of "Z," "A Man and a Woman," "My Night at Maud's" and "The Conformist," doing in Hollywood this week? The 61-year-old French star, veteran of 100 films, is definitely not here shooting a movie. He is instead making his American stage debut Tuesday at the Las Palmas Theatre in six performances of "Potestad," a powerful political play by Argentine playwright Eduardo Pavlovsky.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter
PARIS - Up four old, crooked flights of stairs in her apartment building with no elevator, Emmanuelle Riva sits wrapped in a thick, woven, poncho-like sweater. Warm light streams through colorful windowpanes into her narrow living room, where Riva lives alone, and she's just turned off a pot of boiling water for tea. More than half a century ago, she exploded onto the screen with her mesmerizing interpretation of a modern beauty haunted by love and war in the classic "Hiroshima Mon Amour.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It won the Palme d'Or at Cannes. It accomplished an unprecedented sweep of the European Film Awards, taking best picture, director, actor and actress. The Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. thinks it's the best picture of the year, and so do I. What is it about Michael Haneke's "Amour" that inspires this level of fervor and respect, given that it's basically a two-character drama set almost exclusively in an unassuming Paris apartment? The answer is that "Amour" is a perfect storm of a motion picture, with an icy, immaculate director unexpectedly taking on deeply emotional subject matter: what happens to a lifelong, harmonious marriage when the wife suffers a series of debilitating strokes that changes the couple's life beyond recognition.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"My Night at Maud's." "Claire's Knee." Media/Cinematheque Collection. $59.95. In the great "Ma Nuit Chez Maud"--the fourth of Eric Rohmer's "Six Moral Tales"--a bachelor (Jean-Louis Trintignant), who is both a devout Catholic and a Don Juan, is torn between two women: the piquant Maud (Francoise Fabian), with whom he has a memorable all-night flirtation, and a haunting woman (Marie-Christine Barrault) whom he glimpses from afar at church.
NEWS
August 7, 2003 | From Reuters
French stars turned out in force Wednesday to pay emotional tribute to French actress Marie Trintignant, who died last week after sustaining severe head injuries in a domestic drama that shocked France. She was 41. Trintignant was buried at the French capital's Pere Lachaise cemetery, resting place of Irish writer Oscar Wilde and American rocker Jim Morrison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Francis Girod, 62, a French director and screenwriter whose films featured such actresses as Catherine Deneuve and Romy Schneider, died early Sunday of a heart attack in Bordeaux, France. Girod, who was making a television movie in the southwestern wine capital, died at his hotel, according to members of his crew. After briefly working as a broadcast journalist in the 1960s, Girod learned the movie trade at the side of directors Jean-Pierre Mocky and Roger Vadim.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the 1994 Cannes Film Festival, fans of Krzysztof Kieslowski found their hearts lifted. And then broken. The Polish master was on the Riviera with the magnificent "Red," the final panel in his "Three Colors" triptych and a film widely expected to receive the Palme d'Or, even by Quentin Tarantino, whose "Pulp Fiction" took the honors instead. But for devotees it wasn't the disappointment of laurels denied that was hard to bear; it was Kieslowski's announcement that he was retiring from filmmaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Although its imperturbable director insists that it realizes only 35% of his intentions (as opposed to 30% for the rest of his films), Krzysztof Kieslowski's "Three Colors: Red" looks to be the surest bet to win at least one Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival, if not for film or director then at least for best actor for French veteran Jean-Louis Trintignant.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1992 | BARBARA ISENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is Jean-Louis Trintignant, star of "Z," "A Man and a Woman," "My Night at Maud's" and "The Conformist," doing in Hollywood this week? The 61-year-old French star, veteran of 100 films, is definitely not here shooting a movie. He is instead making his American stage debut Tuesday at the Las Palmas Theatre in six performances of "Potestad," a powerful political play by Argentine playwright Eduardo Pavlovsky.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2010
'The Conformist' It's hard to believe Bernardo Bertolucci's "The Conformist" is 40 years old. The filmmaker's 1970s surreal masterwork couldn't feel more contemporary with its tale of political and sexual dark forces in Mussolini's Facist Italy. Worth seeing on its two-night run at LACMA's Bing Theater on Friday and Saturday for the sheer beauty alone. It's as if the director personally framed every shot for the Uffizi. But, ultimately, it is Marcello's story, in Jean-Louis Trintignant's remarkable hands, that will sweep you away — the false marriage, his paralyzing homosexuality, the political assassination dropped on his plate.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
Adapted by Bernardo Bertolucci from an Alberto Moravia novel, "The Conformist" is a dazzling 1970 masterpiece--at once a study of one man and an entire society. Jean-Louis Trintignant's Marcello (pictured) is a traumatized product of a decayed aristocratic family. When we meet him at age 30 in 1937 he is a respected professor of philosophy.
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