Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJean Luc Cretier
IN THE NEWS

Jean Luc Cretier

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 12, 2006 | Chris Dufresne, Times Staff Writer
The opening ceremony is over and it's downhill from here, starting today with Alpine's signature event atop Kandahar-Banchetta Giovanni Nasi. Super-Gs are super, the combined is a kick and slaloms are slick, but "Olympic downhill champion" is a designation you take to your grave. "It's the blue-ribbon event," Patrick Lang, a longtime World Cup press officer and respected ski-racing journalist, said. "The Olympic downhill champion is a hero."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 13, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
The list of men who have won the coveted Olympic downhill crown is nearly as impressive as the list of men who haven't. Hermann Maier, the Austrian known as the "Herminator," claimed 54 World Cup victories in his illustrious career. But he never snared the big one, although he almost died trying at the 1998 Nagano Games. Marc Giradelli, representing tiny Luxembourg, won five World Cup overall titles but never gold in downhill. Bode Miller, the greatest male skier in U.S. history, has been downhill-denied, as was Daron Rahlves, the former U.S. ski team star who won more World Cup downhills, nine, than any other American male.
Advertisement
SPORTS
February 13, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
The list of men who have won the coveted Olympic downhill crown is nearly as impressive as the list of men who haven't. Hermann Maier, the Austrian known as the "Herminator," claimed 54 World Cup victories in his illustrious career. But he never snared the big one, although he almost died trying at the 1998 Nagano Games. Marc Giradelli, representing tiny Luxembourg, won five World Cup overall titles but never gold in downhill. Bode Miller, the greatest male skier in U.S. history, has been downhill-denied, as was Daron Rahlves, the former U.S. ski team star who won more World Cup downhills, nine, than any other American male.
SPORTS
February 12, 2006 | Chris Dufresne, Times Staff Writer
The opening ceremony is over and it's downhill from here, starting today with Alpine's signature event atop Kandahar-Banchetta Giovanni Nasi. Super-Gs are super, the combined is a kick and slaloms are slick, but "Olympic downhill champion" is a designation you take to your grave. "It's the blue-ribbon event," Patrick Lang, a longtime World Cup press officer and respected ski-racing journalist, said. "The Olympic downhill champion is a hero."
SPORTS
February 15, 1992 | BOB LOCHNER
The French Ski Federation announced Friday that it has withdrawn the protest it filed Tuesday night after the men's Alpine combined competition in Val d'Isere. At the time, the French claimed that the advertising logos for the ski-wear manufacturer Silvy, worn on the sweaters of Josef Polig and Gianfranco Martin, who won the gold and silver medals for Italy that afternoon, exceeded the allowable size.
SPORTS
February 10, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
Hermann, is it the skis? The story behind the story in the oft-delayed Olympic men's downhill start has been the battle of the skis. Constantly changing weather conditions at Hakuba have altered the insiders' favorites at least twice. In Alpine events, skis are almost as important as skiers. Last week, before a series of storms deluged the downhill course, competitors wearing Atomic skis were brimming with confidence. Why?
SPORTS
February 14, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
Norway's Lasse Kjus will better understand the significance of his ski-racing feat once he he gets some rest. For now, pardon Kjus if he sleeps. Friday, in Hakuba, Kjus made history when he became the first Alpine skier to win two Olympic medals (both silver) on the same day. Kjus got the chance because a series of weather postponements forced organizers to double up the men's downhill and the men's downhill combined events within hours of each other on Friday.
SPORTS
February 13, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took five days to get the men's Olympic downhill started, but that was nothing compared to getting it finished. Austria's Hermann Maier provided a new ski-disaster lead-in to replace the ski jumper on "Wide World of Sports" with a horrific, high-speed, three-somersault, head-slam through two retaining fences . . . but somehow walked away. Italy's Luca Cattaneo had to be airlifted out with a torn Achilles' tendon. Gate 7 on the Happo'one course was like Turn 3 at Indy in the rain.
SPORTS
February 13, 1998 | MIKE PENNER
Was it just a bad flashback, a temporary siege of reefer madness, or did Ross Rebagliati really get his gold medal back a few hours before Hermann Maier imploded on the men's downhill course? Dazed and confused, the Nagano Games peered through the fog--or was that second-hand smoke?--and made the proper call on Rebagliati, finally arriving at the conclusion that marijuana does not enhance any athletic performance beyond synchronized pizza scarfing.
SPORTS
January 24, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
USC and Nebraska, two of college football's traditional powers, have scheduled a home-and-home series for 2006 and 2007, USC Athletic Director Mike Garrett said Friday. USC and Nebraska have played only twice, with USC winning, 31-21, at Lincoln in 1969, and the teams playing to a 21-21 tie in Los Angeles in 1970. The first game under the new agreement is scheduled for the Coliseum on Sept. 16, 2006. Then USC will travel to Nebraska to play on Sept. 15, 2007.
SPORTS
February 8, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
SOCHI, Russia - Bode Miller hasn't won a World Cup race since December 2011, the Beaver Creek downhill in Colorado. He is 36 years old and coming off micro-fracture knee surgery that forced him to miss all of last season. He was born in the 1970s, is married and the father of two. Yet, there is overwhelming evidence to suggest old man racer is the man to beat in Sunday's men's Olympic downhill. FRAMEWORK: View the best images from the Sochi Olympics "It's his race to lose," teammate Marco Sullivan said Saturday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|