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Jean Luc Godard

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March 30, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Jean-Luc Godard is not merely the iconoclastic, indefatigable enfant terrible of France's New Wave but one of the most idiosyncratic and important filmmakers of the 20th century, whose innovative spirit continues to flourish into the 21st.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Susan King
Director Roger Michell and writer Hanif Kureishi were on a worldwide promotional tour for "Venus," the 2006 film that earned Peter O'Toole his last Oscar nomination, when the two collaborators' seemingly nonstop travel schedule hatched the concept for a new film. "We had lots of airplane flights and came up with this idea of a couple going to Paris for 48 hours as a very easy and beautiful structure," Michell said. He and Kureishi decided to take their own 48-hour trip to Paris to outline the characters and the plot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Over the course of a career that stretches back more than 50 years, Jean-Luc Godard might have cultivated a reputation as a maker of forbiddingly dense, impenetrably allusion-heavy films, but his work also always holds the potential to offer something groundbreaking and new. Despite (or maybe because of) his penchant for provocation and predilection toward the obtuse, he was and remains a rare, uncanny mix of professor, trickster and crackpot, guardian of the past and gatekeeper of the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Stanley Kauffmann, the longtime film and theater critic of The New Republic who in the 20th century helped define movie reviews as an intellectual form, has died. He was 97. Kauffmann died from complications of pneumonia in New York. A tribute will be held honoring his work but there will be no funeral, per his request, a New Republic spokesman said Wednesday. Over his 54 years at the magazine, Kauffmann assessed innumerable cinematic masterpieces and helped bring a number of seminal directors to light, particularly the New Hollywood filmmakers of the 1970s and European upstart auteurs such as Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a chilling resonance in watching “Le Petit Soldat,” Jean-Luc Godard's classic story of love and allegiance that begins a special one-week run at the Nuart Theatre in West Los Angeles on Friday with a newly remastered print and enhanced subtitles. Its political intrigues entangled with a love story, Godard used the movie as a way to discuss his own take on the rumors of government torture of those who supported the Algerian insurrection against French occupation. Due to be released in 1960, the politically sensitive film was banned in France until 1963, roughly a year after the Algerian war of independence had ended and the reports of torture of insurgents and innocents alike lingered like a dark shadow over the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Jean-Luc Godard made his second feature film, "Le Petit Soldat," in 1960, but it was banned until 1963 because of its tough look at the then-current French-Algerian conflict and unblinking portrayal of torture. Opening Friday at the Nuart in a new 35-millimeter print with fresh translation and subtitles, the often-overlooked film provides a lens through which to view the French director's unparalleled streak of provocation and productivity in the 1960s, as well as a startlingly contemporary-feeling counterpoint to recent politically tinged war films such as "Zero Dark Thirty.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It could be argued that the most pivotal chapter ofJean-Luc Godard's shape-shifting career - as well as one of the most neglected - is the period of video-based experimentation of the mid-'70s. Emerging from a militant post-'68 phase, during which he formed the Dziga Vertov Group, in an effort to "make films politically," Godard developed a complex method of merging and pulling apart images, sounds and text - a dense, sometimes dazzling analytic approach that defines a significant portion of his work to this day. New to DVD from Olive Films, "Ici et Ailleurs" (1976)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jean-Luc Godard, regarded as the spoiled child of French cinema, is up to his usual intellectual tricks in "Nouvelle Vague" ("New Wave"), which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival today. The film concerns an initially destructive but finally triumphant love affair between a beautiful Italian countess, played by Domiziana Giordano, and her lover, weather-beaten French sex symbol Alain Delon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
When Jean-Luc Godard's "Masculine Feminine" opened in Los Angeles 38 years ago last month, it seemed as new as tomorrow's headlines while exploring a theme as old as time -- the essential enigma that a woman can be to a man. Headlines, and hairstyles, may change, but this witty and tender 1966 gem remains as timeless and fresh as ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2006 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Anyone who has even a passing familiarity with the films of Jean-Luc Godard would not be surprised that the eternal enfant terrible of France's New Wave has turned his survey of the cinema of the 20th century into one long Godard movie. Indeed, his admirers would have expected nothing less.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a chilling resonance in watching “Le Petit Soldat,” Jean-Luc Godard's classic story of love and allegiance that begins a special one-week run at the Nuart Theatre in West Los Angeles on Friday with a newly remastered print and enhanced subtitles. Its political intrigues entangled with a love story, Godard used the movie as a way to discuss his own take on the rumors of government torture of those who supported the Algerian insurrection against French occupation. Due to be released in 1960, the politically sensitive film was banned in France until 1963, roughly a year after the Algerian war of independence had ended and the reports of torture of insurgents and innocents alike lingered like a dark shadow over the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Jean-Luc Godard made his second feature film, "Le Petit Soldat," in 1960, but it was banned until 1963 because of its tough look at the then-current French-Algerian conflict and unblinking portrayal of torture. Opening Friday at the Nuart in a new 35-millimeter print with fresh translation and subtitles, the often-overlooked film provides a lens through which to view the French director's unparalleled streak of provocation and productivity in the 1960s, as well as a startlingly contemporary-feeling counterpoint to recent politically tinged war films such as "Zero Dark Thirty.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Maybe it's the hint of Bastille Day in the air, or perhaps it's just an opportunity to use some playful alliteration, but Film Independent at LACMA is going all Gallic on us in July with a series cheerfully titled French Film Fridays. Whatever the reason, it's a pleasure to welcome these screenings to town. The eight rarely seen movies spread over four Fridays are not only a tonic to experience; they also remind us of how strong and wide-ranging the French passion for film has been.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It could be argued that the most pivotal chapter ofJean-Luc Godard's shape-shifting career - as well as one of the most neglected - is the period of video-based experimentation of the mid-'70s. Emerging from a militant post-'68 phase, during which he formed the Dziga Vertov Group, in an effort to "make films politically," Godard developed a complex method of merging and pulling apart images, sounds and text - a dense, sometimes dazzling analytic approach that defines a significant portion of his work to this day. New to DVD from Olive Films, "Ici et Ailleurs" (1976)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Over the course of a career that stretches back more than 50 years, Jean-Luc Godard might have cultivated a reputation as a maker of forbiddingly dense, impenetrably allusion-heavy films, but his work also always holds the potential to offer something groundbreaking and new. Despite (or maybe because of) his penchant for provocation and predilection toward the obtuse, he was and remains a rare, uncanny mix of professor, trickster and crackpot, guardian of the past and gatekeeper of the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By John Penner, Los Angeles Times
Jean-Luc Godard, in one of his countless musings on the love of his life, once said: "The cinema is halfway. We go halfway and the audience meets us halfway. But we have to agree that we need a meeting point. … The image is a meeting point. " The words are from 1981, and since then the two sides have been meeting less and less frequently. Like the late periods of John Coltrane and Miles Davis in jazz, late Godard will never enjoy the appeal of his early classic era. Many devotees of classic Godard view the subsequent films as artistic solipsism.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
All you need to make a movie, Jean-Luc Godard famously proposed, is a girl and a gun, and he proved that formula the first time out of the box with his 1960 "Breathless," the fatalistic romance that started a revolution. Beginning a 50th-anniversary run with a new 35-mm print, "Breathless" is that rare revival that, against noticeable odds, retains the elements that made it celebrated half a century ago. Starring Jean-Paul Belmondo as a brash French hooligan and Jean Seberg as the American in Paris he loves against his better judgment, "Breathless" caused a sensation when it took its place as one of the first examples of what came to be known as la Nouvelle Vague, a.k.a.
MAGAZINE
April 2, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, Scott Kraft is The Times' Paris Bureau chief
Jean-Luc Godard is nowhere to be found at the Swiss apartment building where he lives and works. But he has left a note for his visitor, promising in the strong black strokes of his own pen to be "at your disposal" at 6 o'clock. And, at the appointed hour, the genius of French cinema--a small, thin man of 64 with wiry, graying hair and tortoise-shell glasses--answers the door. He quietly leads the way up a flight of stairs to two large rooms clogged with videotapes and books.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Minute for minute, there is almost certainly no more influential figure in all of cinema than Jean Vigo. You could watch all his films in a single sitting in about the time it takes to get through "Transformers: Dark of the Moon. " Vigo's one feature and three shorts fit on a single DVD — and they will be available Aug. 30 in a Criterion Collection set titled "The Complete Jean Vigo" (both standard-definition and Blu-ray), supplemented with a second disc of extras that includes tributes, new and old, from his many illustrious fans, among them François Truffaut, Eric Rohmer and Michel Gondry.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2010 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As he nears his 80th birthday, Jean-Luc Godard is no less the gadfly that he was 50 years ago, still dividing audiences with politically charged films that leap outside the confines of beginning-middle-end storytelling. However you define "Godardian," there's no denying his profound impact on the language of movies. With the French filmmaker set to receive an honorary Oscar this weekend, here are five indelible examples of the director's alchemical blend of cinéma vérité and theatricality.
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