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Jean Luc Ponty

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Jean-Luc Ponty was in the middle of a musical self-examination when reached by phone earlier this week, in his Seattle hotel: The contemporary-jazz violinist was listening to tapes of his band's concert the previous night in Portland. "It's a bit like looking at oneself in the mirror," the 47-year-old French-born Los Angeles resident chuckled in a French accent. "I make notes of everyone's mistakes, including my own, though I prefer not to count them."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2009 | Chris Barton
Ever go to a jazz show and have a pop concert break out? Pardon the reference to the old joke about hockey games and boxing, but that's sort of what happened at Wednesday's Corea, Clarke and White show at the Hollywood Bowl. At the second reunion in as many years of the original members of '70s fusion favorites Return to Forever (Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke and Lenny White), the group was midway through a Chaka Khan-led cover of the Gershwin standard "I Loves You Porgy" when a black-clad Stevie Wonder was led to the stage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1991
*** Jean-Luc Ponty, "Tchokola," Epic. Ponty seems genuinely transformed by the propulsive power of the fascinating African rhythm section. Most of the pieces offer few harmonic challenges. Still, the violinist finds plenty to work with in the disjunct juju , makossa and zouk rhythms that give this recording its true sense of vitality.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even to some of Jean-Luc Ponty's longtime admirers, the Parisian-born violinist has been in a stylistic rut since the mid- to late-'80s when his jazz-fusion efforts began to lose punch. But "Tchokola"--his latest release on Epic Records--changes that. In the 10-song collection, the Los Angeles-based Ponty takes the brazen step--at least for him--of playing contemporary West African music with an all-African band.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even to some of Jean-Luc Ponty's longtime admirers, the Parisian-born violinist has been in a stylistic rut since the mid- to late-'80s when his jazz-fusion efforts began to lose punch. But "Tchokola"--his latest release on Epic Records--changes that. In the 10-song collection, the Los Angeles-based Ponty takes the brazen step--at least for him--of playing contemporary West African music with an all-African band.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
Though Jean-Luc Ponty has played acoustic violin for the majority of his lengthy career, in recent years he has become deeply involved with two electronic instruments--the Zeta violin, on which he performs, and the Synclavier keyboard, on which he composes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
There's nothing complicated about Jean-Luc Ponty's approach to a performance. Turn on the amps, crank up the sound and get down to business. And that's exactly what he did at the Wiltern Theatre in a concert that provided a generous portion of his high-speed, fusion-style, no-nonsense violin playing. It is, of course, academic by now that Ponty's music has come full circle from the period in the '70s when he was viewed by many as the next great jazz violinist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
She entered the professional arena as a jazz pianist who could raise a room's temperature with the best of them, but it was as a contemporary R&B songwriter/singer/keyboardist that most people first heard of Patrice Rushen. After three jazz LPs for Fantasy Records in the mid-to-late '70s, Rushen, 35, moved to Elektra Records and had six solid-selling releases, topped by 1982's "Straight From the Heart." The LP sold half a million copies, made it to No. 1 on the Billboard R&B charts (and No.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2009 | Chris Barton
Ever go to a jazz show and have a pop concert break out? Pardon the reference to the old joke about hockey games and boxing, but that's sort of what happened at Wednesday's Corea, Clarke and White show at the Hollywood Bowl. At the second reunion in as many years of the original members of '70s fusion favorites Return to Forever (Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke and Lenny White), the group was midway through a Chaka Khan-led cover of the Gershwin standard "I Loves You Porgy" when a black-clad Stevie Wonder was led to the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2003
In Don Heckman's Jazz Spotlight, "Take a bow, players," he lists past jazz violinists Stephane Grappelli, Joe Venuti and Stuff Smith. He also mentions some of the newer ones such as Regina Carter and Jean Luc Ponty. I just wonder how he could not have mentioned Ray Nance (who played with Duke Ellington!) as one of the most influential and one of the best of the bunch. John Howard Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1991
*** Jean-Luc Ponty, "Tchokola," Epic. Ponty seems genuinely transformed by the propulsive power of the fascinating African rhythm section. Most of the pieces offer few harmonic challenges. Still, the violinist finds plenty to work with in the disjunct juju , makossa and zouk rhythms that give this recording its true sense of vitality.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
She entered the professional arena as a jazz pianist who could raise a room's temperature with the best of them, but it was as a contemporary R&B songwriter/singer/keyboardist that most people first heard of Patrice Rushen. After three jazz LPs for Fantasy Records in the mid-to-late '70s, Rushen, 35, moved to Elektra Records and had six solid-selling releases, topped by 1982's "Straight From the Heart." The LP sold half a million copies, made it to No. 1 on the Billboard R&B charts (and No.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
There's nothing complicated about Jean-Luc Ponty's approach to a performance. Turn on the amps, crank up the sound and get down to business. And that's exactly what he did at the Wiltern Theatre in a concert that provided a generous portion of his high-speed, fusion-style, no-nonsense violin playing. It is, of course, academic by now that Ponty's music has come full circle from the period in the '70s when he was viewed by many as the next great jazz violinist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Jean-Luc Ponty was in the middle of a musical self-examination when reached by phone earlier this week, in his Seattle hotel: The contemporary-jazz violinist was listening to tapes of his band's concert the previous night in Portland. "It's a bit like looking at oneself in the mirror," the 47-year-old French-born Los Angeles resident chuckled in a French accent. "I make notes of everyone's mistakes, including my own, though I prefer not to count them."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
Though Jean-Luc Ponty has played acoustic violin for the majority of his lengthy career, in recent years he has become deeply involved with two electronic instruments--the Zeta violin, on which he performs, and the Synclavier keyboard, on which he composes.
NEWS
February 9, 1988
Richard E. (Dick) Bock, Founder of Jazz Record Labels Richard E. (Dick) Bock, 61, founder of Pacific Jazz and World Pacific Records. Bock founded the Pacific Jazz label in the 1950s and produced the recordings of such jazz greats as Buddy Rich, Gerry Mulligan, Chet Baker, Jean-Luc Ponty and the Jazz Crusaders. He later founded World Pacific, working with Ravi Shankar, the sitar scholar and performer. Bock went on to produce documentaries on India through his Aura Productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1986
Having lived as an American in Paris for four years, mingling with the aspiring expatriate literati, I was interested by Elizabeth Venant's "The Third Wave: Paris' Expatriate Literary Scene," Sept. 21). I was, however, disappointed that the one publication that has been around longer than either Passion or Sphinx was not mentioned. Bob Bishop is the editor of the Free Voice, circulation 7,000, which is the only connection some Americans in Paris have with their counterparts. He has published interviews with Peter Brook, Jean-Luc Ponty and Anthony Burgess.
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