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Jean Marie Le Pen

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May 26, 1996 | Scott Kraft, Scott Kraft is Paris bureau chief for The Times. He interviewed Jean-Marie Le Pen in his home study
The big shock in last year's first round of French presidential elections wasn't the winner or even the runner-up. It was the strong support for Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader of the extreme-right National Front. Le Pen collected 15% of the vote, his best showing in three tries for the presidency, on a campaign to expel France's 3 million immigrants. And the stocky, silver-haired politician is still basking in the glow.
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WORLD
January 17, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
Marine Le Pen was elected Sunday to lead France's far-right National Front party, succeeding her father and promising to "de-demonize" the group's image. The 42-year-old National Front deputy leader won a comfortable 67% of votes, becoming a modern and more palatable face of a party known for its anti-immigrant platform, embodied until now by the founder, 82-year-old Jean-Marie Le Pen. By distancing herself from her father's notorious xenophobia and slurs against Jews and the Holocaust, the younger Le Pen has managed to present a softer alternative while still tapping into deepening fears of Islam here.
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WORLD
May 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
French far-right leader Jean-Marie Le Pen urged supporters to abstain from Sunday's presidential runoff rather than vote for front-runner Nicolas Sarkozy or Socialist Segolene Royal. "I invite the voters who showed their confidence in me to give their vote neither to Madame Royal nor to Mr. Sarkozy," Le Pen told thousands of supporters at a rally in Paris to commemorate Joan of Arc.
WORLD
December 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The trial of French far-right leader Jean-Marie Le Pen opened, with prosecutors saying he should receive a five-month suspended prison sentence and a $14,530 fine for saying that the Nazi occupation of France was "not particularly inhumane." Le Pen's trial on charges of "justification of war crimes" and "contesting crimes against humanity" is based on a 2005 interview with right-wing weekly magazine Rivarol. He denies any wrongdoing and did not attend the trial.
NEWS
September 21, 1987
Interior Minister Charles Pasqua said the French government is considering banning the works of historians who question the authenticity of the Holocaust. He commented in a radio interview as 30,000 people gathered near Paris to show support for right-wing presidential contender Jean-Marie Le Pen, who sparked protests by describing Nazi gas chambers as a minor point of history. Pasqua suggested that France adopt a law similar to a West German ban on neo-Nazi activities.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader of the far right in France, was stripped of his immunity by the European Parliament, clearing the way for a trial on state charges brought by France. Le Pen had claimed immunity on the basis of his membership in the Parliament. Although he will be prosecuted for "insulting a minister," the real issue is anti-Semitism. Last year, Le Pen referred to Civil Service Minister Michel Durafour with a pun that involved the term for gas ovens.
NEWS
April 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
About 100,000 students marched to show their opposition to extreme-right presidential candidate Jean-Marie Le Pen. At many French universities, Thursday was declared a day without classes so that students could debate the political situation. Tens of thousands of protesters have filled the streets daily since Sunday's first-round presidential vote, when Le Pen qualified to face conservative President Jacques Chirac in the May 5 runoff.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of anti-racist demonstrators marched through Paris, denouncing both the extreme-right National Front and the Socialist government for its tougher stance on immigration. Organizers said about 100,000 people joined the march, but police put the figure at 25,000. The protest was peaceful, with no disruption from National Front supporters.
NEWS
June 13, 1995
All eyes will be on the right when French voters go to the polls across the country Sunday in the second and final round of voting to choose mayors and council members. In the initial round, last Sunday , the anti-immigrant extreme right, whose national leader is Jean-Marie Le Pen, managed just about 6% of the vote nationwide. (The ruling conservative coalition of French President Jacques Chirac won 49%, better than in the last election but not as well as conservatives had hoped.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
The National Assembly approved a new anti-racism measure today widely believed to be aimed at Jean-Marie Le Pen and his far-right National Front party. Under the bill, anyone convicted of practicing or promoting racial discrimination could be barred from holding any elected office or government job for five years. The governing Socialists have blamed Le Pen and his colleagues for creating a climate of racial animosity.
WORLD
May 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
French far-right leader Jean-Marie Le Pen urged supporters to abstain from Sunday's presidential runoff rather than vote for front-runner Nicolas Sarkozy or Socialist Segolene Royal. "I invite the voters who showed their confidence in me to give their vote neither to Madame Royal nor to Mr. Sarkozy," Le Pen told thousands of supporters at a rally in Paris to commemorate Joan of Arc.
WORLD
April 16, 2007 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
This pleasant, slightly faded city of palm trees and sea breezes has been shaped by migratory currents: workers from North Africa, middle-class retirees from Lyon and Paris, elderly French who fled Algeria after the former colony won independence. The sometimes uneasy Mediterranean mix makes Nice a bastion of Jean-Marie Le Pen, the far-right candidate who has emerged once again as a major force with a week to go before the first round of the French presidential race.
WORLD
May 6, 2002 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
French President Jacques Chirac sailed to a resounding reelection victory Sunday over far-right candidate Jean- Marie Le Pen, capitalizing on high turnout and crossover leftist votes to block a surprise extremist challenge that had provoked an uproar. Chirac, a veteran leader of the center-right, won 81.9% of the vote to Le Pen's 18.1% in the runoff presidential election, according to official results with 96% of ballots counted.
WORLD
May 2, 2002 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1 million people marched through the streets of France on Wednesday in peaceful demonstrations against Jean-Marie Le Pen, the far-right candidate challenging incumbent President Jacques Chirac in Sunday's runoff election. The protests were part of the traditional marches held on the May 1 workers' holiday. But Wednesday's turnout was far greater than usual and included a broad spectrum of political parties, social activists and families with no particular ideological affiliation.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | From Associated Press
At least 200,000 protesters marched in Paris and other French cities Saturday in a persistent show of anger at far-right presidential candidate Jean-Marie Le Pen's surprise success in the first round of voting last weekend. Protesters in the capital chanted "Down with the National Front"--Le Pen's nationalist, anti-immigration party. Some beat on drums. One held a sign that read simply, "I'm ashamed."
NEWS
April 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
About 100,000 students marched to show their opposition to extreme-right presidential candidate Jean-Marie Le Pen. At many French universities, Thursday was declared a day without classes so that students could debate the political situation. Tens of thousands of protesters have filled the streets daily since Sunday's first-round presidential vote, when Le Pen qualified to face conservative President Jacques Chirac in the May 5 runoff.
NEWS
April 23, 2002 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran brawler savoring what is his biggest and perhaps last success, presidential candidate Jean-Marie Le Pen declared Monday that his electoral upset shows that he is the candidate of "little people" challenging a discredited political system. On the day after his surprise second-place finish in the first-round vote landed him a spot in next month's runoff against incumbent Jacques Chirac, Le Pen met reporters to survey the political wreckage in his wake.
NEWS
April 22, 2002 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far-right candidate Jean-Marie Le Pen rocked the political landscape in the first round of France's presidential election Sunday, upsetting Prime Minister Lionel Jospin and setting up a runoff with President Jacques Chirac. Le Pen, a former paratrooper who has been accused of neo-fascism and racism throughout a rowdy political career, is the first far-right candidate in French history to advance to the final round in a presidential election.
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