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Jean Michel Basquiat

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010
The titular painter and graffiti artist of Tamra Davis' documentary "Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child" continues to garner fascination and analysis. Getting its title from an article in Artforum that first brought the sprout-headed artist to the attention of the New York gallery scene, the film builds upon footage of an interview Basquiat did in 1985. Davis, a close friend of the artist, who died in 1988 of a heroin overdose, gives the documentary a deep, emotional core. Landmark Nuart Theatre, 11272 Santa Monica Boulevard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Former MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch suggested during a REDCAT panel discussion Tuesday night that a new art star has been belatedly born: Michael Chow, who studied painting and architecture and acted in films as a young man in London before launching his first Mr. Chow restaurant there in 1968. A short film shown before the discussion documented Chow's return to painting over the past two years. It depicted the 74-year-old restaurateur flinging paint, milk and melted metal onto canvases, mashing them with egg yolks, sticking on sponges and other materials, and coming up with something reminiscent of classic Jackson Pollock.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Rueful riddle: He was black. In the '80s he rose mercury-fashion from obscurity to superstardom. Now he is dead of a drug overdose at the age of 27. What was his occupation? According to prevailing stereotype he should have been a rock musician.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
The big, basic, almost naive shapes of Roy Dowell's paintings, collages and sculptures at Various Small Fires bring to mind Marsden Hartley or in their more agitated moments, Jean-Michel Basquiat. Like them, the L.A. artist seems to draw from a vocabulary of personal symbols that give his work an idiosyncratic, totemic quality. The paintings and collages achieve a pleasing balance between gestural efforts, letterforms and flat, geometric areas of color or pattern. They get more interesting the more you look at them, like art historical palimpsests that span prehistory to our media-saturated present.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
Nicolo Donato's bleak yet compelling "Brotherhood," an unsparing neo-noir with the structure and inevitability of classic drama, opens in the dark of night with a man entrapping a young, inexperienced gay man into a bashing and then cuts to a young blond soldier being told by his commanding officer he cannot be promoted because he's been accused of making passes at fellow soldiers. The soldier, Lars (Thure Lindhardt), is vulnerable when by chance he falls into a group of neo- Nazis and is recruited by its leader, the bearded, paunchy but implacably forceful Michael (Nicolas Bro)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1995 | AMEI WALLACH, NEWSDAY
The director is wearing Reeboks, untied, with no socks. His purple shirt is damp with sweat, his love beads are red and turquoise over an exceedingly hairy chest. Hard to say about the legs, since they're covered in an orange sarong. This is Julian Schnabel, the very rich and very famous enfant terrible painter of the '80s art world, as film director.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2005
Re Christopher Knight's review of the Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art ["Hail the King," July 19]: There isn't a landlord in America who, if he found these random scrawls on his walls, wouldn't immediately paint them over. If Basquiat's work is a parody of intellectual pretension, Knight's appraisal would have been the first one he would have taken aim at. Keith Rocklin Los Angeles MOCA delivers! The Basquiat exhibition overflows with exuberance, talent and intrigue -- a "must see" for art lovers everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
MOVIES Topanga Film Festival Now in its sixth year, the Topanga Film Festival is committed to bringing the best in independent and experimental filmmaking to its screens. Documentaries, short films, features and contributions from budding young directors will be screened — some under the stars — over four days. The main screening tent is at 120 Topanga Canyon Blvd., Topanga, but there are other locations as well. Fri.-Sun. Times and prices vary. http://www.topangafilmfestival.
MAGAZINE
April 4, 2004
Patrick J. Kiger's article on "The Golden Age of Mediocrity" (March 7) was especially thought-provoking for me as a classical musician. Whether we like it or not, the culture of pop music reflects contemporary life, and audiences call their favorite performers "geniuses." My concern is how to salvage the phenomenon of traditional genius in classical music. It seems that contemporary classical performers are influenced by the super-intense emotions of rock musicians. A return to the mastering of beautiful sound, though, would bring back the meaning of a true genius-performer in the classical style.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Larry Gagosian kicks off the fall season with yet another exhibition of fake child art from New York. One Jean-Michel Basquiat seems like more than enough, but apparently there are dozens of ambitious rookies slaving away in the dark recesses of Gotham who don't feel that way. Borrowing liberally from the schoolyard style that Basquiat pioneered, most of them fail to add anything of their own to the recipe--but, hey, no sweat. There's no place like the art world for unloading a truckload of Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
It's possible to pare down the gist of "Magna Carta Holy Grail," the 12th solo studio album from New York rapper/businessman/new dad Jay-Z, to three simple words uttered in a track called "Tom Ford. " "I'm so special," declares the rapper, 43, and anyone who stayed up late Wednesday night to hear the record, issued first through a computer app available only to owners of a particular brand of smartphone, isn't in a position to argue. He's the man who can sell a million records with a minion's flip of a switch.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By David Ng
A painting by Wassily Kandinsky has sold for $21.2 million at a Christie's auction of Impressionist and Modern works of art in London. The auction on Tuesday brought in a hefty total of $100.4 million, but the sale lacked any major surprises.  Kandinsky's "Study for Improvisation 3," created in 1909, was the top seller of the evening. The price was in the middle of the auction house's expectation range. The brightly colored landscape painting sold for $16.8 million in 2008. Tuesday's auction also featured Picasso's 1960 painting "Woman Seated in an Armchair," which sold for $9.6 million, slightly surpassing expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By David Ng
Did it come with a card attached that says, "Thank you for being a friend"? A 1991 painting depicting a topless Bea Arthur that was created by artist John Currin has sold at an auction Wednesday for $1.9 million. The sale was part of a larger Christie's auction in New York of post-war and contemporary art that brought in a total of $495 million -- a record figure for any art auction. The Christie's sale featured 72 items by many of the most coveted names in 20th century art. Works by Jackson Pollock, Roy Lichtenstein and Jean-Michel Basquiat brought in record auction amounts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Fans can have one last look at works by Jean-Michel Basquiat before they go on sale. More than 30 pieces -- from simple crayon on paper to sophisticated, colorful canvases -- will be on display May 2 through June 9 at Sotheby's galleries in New York. Most are then bound for a private sale. Pieces by the Brooklyn-born painter, who died of a drug overdose in 1988, have continued to fetch high prices at auction. ART: Can you guess the high price? Christie's in November sold Basquiat's 1981 untitled portrait of a fisherman for a record $26.4 million, and next month the auction house is asking between $25 million and $35 million for "Dustheads," a 7-foot acrylic painting of two figures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2012 | Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Four straight rows of four palm trees each stand on the northeast corner of 2nd and Spring streets downtown - a block from Los Angeles City Hall, right alongside LAPD headquarters. They're directly across from the newsroom. I stare out at them from my desk. Lately they have come to look like hourglasses running out of time. Small tufts of green fronds reach to the sky. Ample brown ones drag down toward the dirt. Will the dead fronds ever be trimmed? Would it make a difference?
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Robert Hughes, a giant of 20th-century art criticism who first became known in the U.S. through his reviews for Time magazine, has died at age 74. The Australian writer was famous for writing big books on big subjects -- from the early history of Australia ("The Fatal Shore" of 1987) to the pioneers of modern art ("The Shock of the New" of 1981).  Both books were bestsellers for his publisher Random House, which confirmed that Hughes died Monday in New York after a long illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By David Ng
A painting by Wassily Kandinsky has sold for $21.2 million at a Christie's auction of Impressionist and Modern works of art in London. The auction on Tuesday brought in a hefty total of $100.4 million, but the sale lacked any major surprises.  Kandinsky's "Study for Improvisation 3," created in 1909, was the top seller of the evening. The price was in the middle of the auction house's expectation range. The brightly colored landscape painting sold for $16.8 million in 2008. Tuesday's auction also featured Picasso's 1960 painting "Woman Seated in an Armchair," which sold for $9.6 million, slightly surpassing expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
MOVIES Topanga Film Festival Now in its sixth year, the Topanga Film Festival is committed to bringing the best in independent and experimental filmmaking to its screens. Documentaries, short films, features and contributions from budding young directors will be screened — some under the stars — over four days. The main screening tent is at 120 Topanga Canyon Blvd., Topanga, but there are other locations as well. Fri.-Sun. Times and prices vary. http://www.topangafilmfestival.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
Nicolo Donato's bleak yet compelling "Brotherhood," an unsparing neo-noir with the structure and inevitability of classic drama, opens in the dark of night with a man entrapping a young, inexperienced gay man into a bashing and then cuts to a young blond soldier being told by his commanding officer he cannot be promoted because he's been accused of making passes at fellow soldiers. The soldier, Lars (Thure Lindhardt), is vulnerable when by chance he falls into a group of neo- Nazis and is recruited by its leader, the bearded, paunchy but implacably forceful Michael (Nicolas Bro)
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