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Jean O Leary

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2005
A memorial service for gay rights activist Jean O'Leary will be held at 3 p.m. July 24 in the Renberg Theatre at the Village at Ed Gould Plaza, 1125 N. McCadden Place, Hollywood. The village is a facility of the L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center. O'Leary, who helped raise the discussion of gay equality to a national level as a Democratic activist and leader of such groups as the National Gay Rights Advocates, died June 4 in San Clemente. She was 57.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2005
A memorial service for gay rights activist Jean O'Leary will be held at 3 p.m. July 24 in the Renberg Theatre at the Village at Ed Gould Plaza, 1125 N. McCadden Place, Hollywood. The village is a facility of the L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center. O'Leary, who helped raise the discussion of gay equality to a national level as a Democratic activist and leader of such groups as the National Gay Rights Advocates, died June 4 in San Clemente. She was 57.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2005 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Jean O'Leary, a pioneering lesbian activist who helped raise discussion of gay equality to a national level through a historic White House meeting in 1977 and who battled for gay rights in employment and on other fronts, died Saturday of lung cancer in San Clemente. She was 57. In 1976, O'Leary, a former nun, was the first openly lesbian delegate at a Democratic National Convention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2005 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Jean O'Leary, a pioneering lesbian activist who helped raise discussion of gay equality to a national level through a historic White House meeting in 1977 and who battled for gay rights in employment and on other fronts, died Saturday of lung cancer in San Clemente. She was 57. In 1976, O'Leary, a former nun, was the first openly lesbian delegate at a Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | ANN JAPENGA, Times Staff Writer
Bobby, the lead singer in a teen-age rock band, had plans for his drummer, Jean O'Leary. He intended to marry her once they were graduated from their Catholic high school in Cleveland. Bobby had competition, however. In her graduation speech, O'Leary announced that she would be entering the convent. Her high school friends who had known her as an irreverent rock 'n' roller were shocked at the turn O'Leary had taken.
NEWS
May 1, 1985 | ANN JAPENGA, Times Staff Writer
She was what was known as a "particular friend" in convent vernacular. An older nun, she was both teacher and inspiration to Nancy Manahan, who was at the time in her first year at the Maryknoll Missionary Sisters' Novitiate near St. Louis. Because talking was allowed only during restricted periods and preferring the company of one nun over the others was forbidden, Manahan said she often had to confess to two transgressions--breaking silence and having a particular friend.
NEWS
August 19, 1995
Robert Eichberg, 50, psychologist and gay rights activist who co-founded National Coming Out Day. Eichberg, who wrote a popular book titled "Coming Out: An Act of Love," co-founded the annual Oct. 11 observance with Jean O'Leary in 1988. A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Eichberg lived most of his life in Los Angeles, where he raised funds to assist AIDS patients, campaigned for gay rights and in 1982 briefly sought the Democratic nomination for the Hollywood-area Assembly seat.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
A state appeals court has ruled for the first time that California firms cannot discharge employees because they have AIDS. The 3-0 ruling by the 2nd District Court of Appeal in Ventura on Monday found that a state law banning job discrimination against the handicapped applies as well to people with AIDS. "It's very precedent-setting," said Jean O'Leary, executive director of a Los Angeles-based National Gay Rights Advocates.
NEWS
July 23, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
In a meeting punctuated by effusive courtesy and expressions of unity, the Democratic National Committee agreed on Friday to expand its membership to bring in supporters of the Rev. Jesse Jackson, including his son, Jesse Jackson Jr. Expansion of the DNC is an important symbolic victory for Jackson, who has long said his supporters have been excluded unfairly from the party's hierarchy. The committee, however, has little real power.
NEWS
December 5, 1986 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In what lawyers say is the largest financial settlement of its kind, Pacific Bell has agreed to pay $3 million to resolve claims by former employees and applicants who say they were denied jobs and promotions because they are homosexuals. The agreement, subject to approval by a judge, culminates a widely watched, 11-year legal battle that produced a landmark state Supreme Court ruling in 1979 protecting homosexuals from employment discrimination.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | ANN JAPENGA, Times Staff Writer
Bobby, the lead singer in a teen-age rock band, had plans for his drummer, Jean O'Leary. He intended to marry her once they were graduated from their Catholic high school in Cleveland. Bobby had competition, however. In her graduation speech, O'Leary announced that she would be entering the convent. Her high school friends who had known her as an irreverent rock 'n' roller were shocked at the turn O'Leary had taken.
NEWS
April 17, 1989 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Chill winds blowing across the courtyard of the Museum of Contemporary Art didn't deter some 400 people from celebrating the 11th anniversary of National Gay Rights Advocates Saturday night. They shivered underneath heat lamps as writer Susan Sontag, manager/producer Barry Krost and Ohio Gov. Richard Celeste were honored for their contributions to gay rights and awareness about AIDS. All three honorees expressed gratitude for their recognition but pointed out that the struggle isn't over, the battle hasn't yet been won. "We are fighting a disease that is eating at the very heart and soul of this nation," said Krost, who received the humanitarian award.
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge upheld Friday a precedent-setting state commission ruling that bans employers from discriminating against workers with AIDS. Superior Court Judge Patrick McMahon sustained on appeal a 1987 ruling by the California Fair Employment and Housing Commission that AIDS patients are protected by state laws that guard the physically handicapped against job discrimination. The commission's ruling was directed at Raytheon Corp., which filed the appeal heard by McMahon.
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